Search found 63 matches

by a.twiddler
14 Apr 2021, 3:57pm
Forum: On the road
Topic: How to tackle restrictive gates / barriers
Replies: 50
Views: 1702

Re: How to tackle restrictive gates / barriers

VinceLedge wrote: 5 Apr 2021, 1:55pm I am interested to hear how recumbents riders manage with cycle barriers?
My Linear can be got through this type of barrier though at 88" long with the path being offset it can be a challenge. With this particular one being on a steep hill it can be cycled through downhill but it involves paddling to get through in the other direction. The mirror needs readjusting if it makes contact on the way through. It is this type of thing that has discouraged me from trying a trike so far. I haven't measured the width with a tape. It's possible that some of the narrower track trikes might manage it.

I can also get it through bike accessible swinging gates by standing it on the back wheel and wriggling through, though it would be a bit tedious to have to do many on one outing.

Image

The top corners of the seat just clear the inward sloping part of the barrier.

None of this is helpful to someone in a wheelchair or who uses a trike to boost their mobility who wants to access the facilities on the other side. This is an access route to a sports field with indoor facilities.
by a.twiddler
20 Jan 2021, 11:18am
Forum: Does anyone know … ?
Topic: Does a Hamax childseat fit Trek MTB?
Replies: 15
Views: 415

Re: Does a Hamax childseat fit Trek MTB?

This is exactly what I thought when I saw the OP. Better to have a bike that is easier (maybe safer) to ride with a child on the back with a low or even "ladies'" style top tube and then you can keep the high spec bike for off roading on your own with no compromises. This assumes that you can find a suitable bike cheaply enough used, of course. I think there is still a premium on used bikes due to Coronavirus, and new bikes are not so easy to find unless you are prepared to be flexible in your requirements, ie accepting a choice from limited stocks. Keep an eye open, especially for used bikes, and you just might strike lucky.
by a.twiddler
13 Jan 2021, 12:34pm
Forum: Health and fitness
Topic: Cycling after a vasectomy??
Replies: 17
Views: 1083

Re: Cycling after a vasectomy??

Not had it done myself but my brother had it done some years ago.

He had a phobia about needles but his friend was going to have it done at the same time so he had some moral support. As it happened, my brother had no issues whatsoever, but his friend had some bruising and swelling. As he recounted it, he was advised to avoid riding a bike for a few days.

"Avoid riding my bike! I can't even reach the blasted pedals!"
by a.twiddler
13 Jan 2021, 10:42am
Forum: Does anyone know … ?
Topic: Tier 4 exercise limits
Replies: 312
Views: 13668

Re: Tier 4 exercise limits

I just have this mental picture of Prime Minister Johnson out on even the most casual of bike rides being surrounded by his security detail of enormous, serious, suited men on a fleet of tiny Bromptons. I don't imagine he is much of a one for solitude but still, it must take away a lot of the spontaneous pleasure of it all.

Then there is the media attention. I don't suppose they use bikes though it adds to the whimsical mental picture. Can't a bloke just go for an incognito bike ride during lockdown? Not if you're the Prime Minister. It probably turns into Boris Johnson's Cycling Circus (all appropriately socially distanced of course). Then gets used as a tool to bash Johnson and/or cyclists depending on the perspective of the media outlet.
by a.twiddler
7 Nov 2020, 3:51pm
Forum: Non-standard, Human Powered Vehicles
Topic: Newbie to a laid back view
Replies: 34
Views: 1832

Re: Newbie to a laid back view

Perhaps speed or the lack of it is the key. Other riders may be able to get more speed out of the Linear (though I don't claim to be fast on anything) but it definitely is built for comfort over speed. Even over the worst unexpected potholes my feet just stay in place when my backside is being jarred about. Over expected unavoidable ones I have found you can brace yourself against the pedals and spare your behind some trauma. Maybe tomorrow I will hit some crater and find my feet fly around all over the place, but up to now it's all been good. Also, it's early days yet, in the interests of more effciency I could in the future become a convert to clipless, particularly if I were to venture into the world of SWB recumbents.

Speed is relative, of course. Earlier this year it was an occasion to hang the flags out when I managed to maintain 12mph average for 20 miles on my steel tourer. I haven't tried the same course on the Linear but I will wait for a calm day and try it for size. Of course being nagged by a cycle computer could be the pathway to misery, as I've only this year been using them again after a long break during which I've enjoyed the innocence of ignorance.
by a.twiddler
4 Nov 2020, 3:36pm
Forum: Touring & Expedition
Topic: Towns and Villages in Wiltshire
Replies: 44
Views: 2229

Re: Towns and Villages in Wiltshire

There are some very evocative place names in that list.
by a.twiddler
3 Nov 2020, 3:22pm
Forum: Non-standard, Human Powered Vehicles
Topic: Newbie to a laid back view
Replies: 34
Views: 1832

Re: Newbie to a laid back view

Clip? Unclip? What sorcery is this? Despite having initial qualms about foot retention, on my Linear I find that my feet stay put without mechanical assistance on flat wide BMX type pedals with ordinary shoes or trainers. In comparison with my folder which has smooth plastic folding pedals where they are prone to slip in the wet, or on my tourer with the security of toeclips and straps, on the recumbent they stay put until I want to come in to land. No frantic attempts to clip/ unclip involved, they just work through friction.

When I first came to the darkside I thought that clips or some kind of retention would be essential to keep my feet from dropping once I became weary on a long ride but this just has not happened. As it's a recumbent bike it would not be a disaster if it even happened rarely, unlike on a tadpole trike where you might run over your own leg. Now that I've been riding it for a few months even stop start riding and hill starts, or even stop start hill starts, have lost their terror. It just takes a bit longer to get started again than an upright.The flat wide pedals also give you something to aim for -if you don't get your foot square on immediately you can shuffle it about a bit once you get rolling. However, it's a LWB recumbent with the BB axle slightly lower than the seat, it might be a bit different on a SWB with the BB axle mounted higher. Anticipation, conservation of momentum and loads of practice are the thing.

The Linear is not the thing for trackstands but I have found that by giving a little extra space to traffic in front (traffic almost invariably gives you plenty of space) you can often delay the moment of having to put your foot down to the extent that you can avoid it as they get moving while your wheels are just still turning.

Some weeks ago I was having a go at getting through an "A" frame barrier uphill. Earlier on that day I had passed through it successfully going down hill without stopping or putting my feet down, by putting my elbows out. Unfortunately I didn't manage to get into a low enough gear going up and stalled. I then fell over into a small but strategically placed clump of nettles. I feel steve6854's pain! First time I've fallen off this bike, though, and apart from the stinging nettles, it was a soft landing. Must guard against too much hubris next time round.
by a.twiddler
3 Oct 2020, 10:02pm
Forum: Bikes & Bits – Technical section
Topic: Interupter brake levers
Replies: 41
Views: 1398

Re: Interupter brake levers

They get a recommendation from me. I did a drop bar conversion to a flat bar hybrid about 12 years ago and found them straightforward to fit with 3TTT Randonneur bars. They gave the ability to gently brake with thumbs or a finger with hands on the sides as well as full on braking on the flats or drops.
No issues with cable fraying or water ingress. I've had them ready fitted on my last two drop handlebar bikes and it feels strange to ride a bike without them now. I would certainly fit them retrospectively if I bought a bike with all the other attributes that I like, if it didn't have them already.
by a.twiddler
1 Sep 2020, 8:56pm
Forum: Non-standard, Human Powered Vehicles
Topic: Nothing New
Replies: 3
Views: 287

Re: Nothing New

Not only a short wheelbase, the rider seems placed very high compared with modern recumbents. She keeps on smiling though, perhaps it's an occupational hazard on recumbents, from whatever era!
by a.twiddler
28 Aug 2020, 10:22pm
Forum: Non-standard, Human Powered Vehicles
Topic: Linear Frame number or Serial Number
Replies: 9
Views: 391

Re: Linear Frame number or Serial Number

Here we go. After some detective work I have come up with the following. As far as I know the dates are correct, but there may be errors.

Rear hub. Sachs 3X7. Made from 1994-2000. Sachs taken over by SRAM in 1997. Marked with "Sachs 3X7", so probably pre '97, though Sachs marked stock may have been sold by SRAM after '97. Previous owner stated it was on it when he bought it in 2001, and he had a 700C rim built on to it. It had no front changer or post, just the triple chainset.

Rear Derailleur is marked "Exage 500", made from 1990-93. May or may not be original, may have been from stock after '93. I would have to take it off and look at the back for more info.

Front triple chainring is marked Suntour X-1. X-1 available from 92-93. May have been from stock after '93. It ties in with photos of other Linears I have seen, some with Sachs 3X7 hubs and no front changer, and some with a front derailleur post and changer with no hub gear. The X-1 is fairly distinctive in appearance.

According to the manual the fuzzy picture of the rear brake shows a Dia Compe caliper brake. It must have had a long reach if the original wheel was 26", maybe even an Old School BMX brake? It now has an unidentified caliper brake which just has enough reach for the 700C wheel, presumably sourced from someone's bits box when the wheel was rebuilt to 700C.

The front wheel has a drum brake with no markings, alloy hub, steel torque arm, and a nice satin finish alloy rim. It is a 500A size, and from what the seller told me was on it when he bought it. It doubt it was an original option from Linear, probably acquired somewhere in its history. There are no V brake bosses on the fork, so probably originally had a caliper brake.

If as I suspect it came from the factory with a Sachs 3X7 hub gear it could not be earlier than 1994. If it was much more recent than '94 it might have more recent components. My best guess would be that it dates from around 1994-95.

It would be interesting to hear from other Linear owners who might know the vintage of their own bikes, and to see what components are on theirs.
by a.twiddler
26 Aug 2020, 11:34pm
Forum: Non-standard, Human Powered Vehicles
Topic: Linear Frame number or Serial Number
Replies: 9
Views: 391

Re: Linear Frame number or Serial Number

It's a mystery. I have seen variations but they may have been options rather than standard date specific items. For example, bolted on bottom bracket assembly on mine vs welded ones, chain hangers riveted to the rear frame for convenience when folded (not on mine). There are no manufacturer's decals on the head tube on mine which came in what looked like the original silver painted steel (I've since painted it and the forks black) though I've seen the yellow Kann decals on photos of early ones, and there may be later ones with Linear Manufacturing Co decals. Of course decals can be damaged or removed over time.

Even the serial numbers seem to be applied differently, as Tandem2 says his is on a sticker, mine is stamped.

The "Linear" logo in reflective red seems to have survived through the years without change on the side of the frame, with "Aluminum" in reflective white towards the front. The "Aluminum" logo has been removed on mine maybe by someone who objected to the US spelling!

The more I find out, the more I am impressed by the longevity of a design that was in its definitive form from about the mid eighties until about 2002, was still around in a slightly modified form for a few more years before being revamped for the 21st century, and is still recognisably the offspring of that original design and available today. And this despite the company having many owners through its life.
by a.twiddler
26 Aug 2020, 1:52pm
Forum: Non-standard, Human Powered Vehicles
Topic: Linear Frame number or Serial Number
Replies: 9
Views: 391

Re: Linear Frame number or Serial Number

I emailed "The Bicycle Man" of Alfred Station, New York State, who currently produces the modern generation of Linears and he has confirmed that it is not possible to date Iowa Linears from the serial numbers. He gave me a series of links but these are easily found on his website, and have no new information. He was very prompt in his reply, less than an hour.

As it has a calliper rear brake and no V brake mountings on the front (drum brake is fitted) all I can definitely say so far is that it is "before 2002". Now if I could confirm the dates when they were available in the UK this might narrow things down a bit.
by a.twiddler
26 Aug 2020, 10:17am
Forum: Non-standard, Human Powered Vehicles
Topic: Linear Frame number or Serial Number
Replies: 9
Views: 391

Re: Linear Frame number or Serial Number

No sticker, but on the underside of the main frame is a faintly stamped 6 figure number, just behind the front fork folding aperture as you described.

Thank you for that. Now I have something to go on, if there is a way of dating it from the number sequence.
by a.twiddler
25 Aug 2020, 1:03pm
Forum: Non-standard, Human Powered Vehicles
Topic: Linear Frame number or Serial Number
Replies: 9
Views: 391

Linear Frame number or Serial Number

I spent some time tidying my Linear and getting it ready to ride when I first had it but one thing that I didn't come across was any frame number. It might be useful for working out the manufacturing date to fill in some history. Have any of you Linearites out there any info on its location, if indeed there is one? I haven't found anything on the internet so far, even on The Bicycle Man's website, which is generally a mine of information.
by a.twiddler
23 Aug 2020, 3:28pm
Forum: Does anyone know … ?
Topic: Brooks Saddles (Sprung) to stop Wibble Wobble
Replies: 14
Views: 462

Re: Brooks Saddles (Sprung) to stop Wibble Wobble

How about something like this? It works better on a larger frame size due to height issues.

[img]
Thorn%20Saddlebag%20Bracket.jpg
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