Search found 351 matches

by andrewk
22 Apr 2017, 12:11am
Forum: The Tea Shop
Topic: Terrorist vehicle attacks -Shoot the driver
Replies: 30
Views: 1445

Re: Shoot the driver

landsurfer wrote:We where always taught to shoot to the torso ... the standard target is of a compact torso, head profile.
Shooting the tyres and other stuff is the fayre of the movies.
Head shots and torso shots are stoppers.
With a 7.62 or .308 round.
5.62 ..... not always a stopper, even if a "tumble " round.


The cops only have 5.56 and 9mm in general issue/carry, they can call on snipers with 7.62 but it isn't available as an instant response. 5.56 will penetrate windscreens and car/lorry doors so should be adequate.
by andrewk
6 Apr 2017, 3:32am
Forum: On the road
Topic: texting whilst in control of a vehicle
Replies: 23
Views: 1509

texting whilst in control of a vehicle

No, not a car driver, not a lorry driver but a stupid prat texting whilst cycling in light traffic in London...an accident waiting to happen...or waiting for Darwinian selection to take effect.
Doubtless if he is killed/maimed there will be protests from the vociferous cycling lobby...but with morons like this it could well be their own fault.
by andrewk
25 Mar 2017, 12:54am
Forum: On the road
Topic: New to cycle commute
Replies: 12
Views: 928

Re: New to cycle commute

Comfort - tyre size is the main determinant, avoid skinny racing bike tyres, go for tyres between 32mm and 42mm in width.

Efficiency - MTB tyres (knoblies) are very draggy, slicks or tyres with moderate tread are way more efficient.

Wind resistance - drop handlebar bikes can help but will only make a difference v. hybrids if you ride on the dropped part of the handlebar - some find this uncomfortable so ride on the hoods which is equivalent to a hybrid.

Commuting practicality - Puncture resistant tyres are invaluable, again wider tyres (as above) help here too. Panniers or laptop specific ones are more comfortable than a rucksac.

Bike type - a touring bike or tekking bike (fully equipped hybrid with rack, mudguards, and hub dynamo lights) would seem to be the best, most practical type. You can always add mudguards, rack and battery lights to a hybrid or cross bike.

Wide gear range - required for all those hills unless you are very fit.

Cost - anything new for less than £300 is likely to be crap and have rubbish components which will fail early and lead to expensive replacements, basically a false economy. Personally, I would look at £600 and up for a reliable, comfortable and practical commuter.
by andrewk
28 Feb 2017, 11:49pm
Forum: Campaigning & Public Policy
Topic: the benefits of congestion
Replies: 72
Views: 21814

Re: the benefits of congestion

horizon wrote:
andrewk wrote:
Vorpal wrote:
So, it got me to thinking. What if congestion were terrible all the time. What if we limited traffic to a couple of main throughfares, and only allowed it off into residential areas for access. Would more people cycle? Just to get away from the nightmare traffic? Can we do an experiment somewhere with this? What is the tipping point at which people start to cycle? It is down to journey time?


Wishing congestion on others merely to promote cycling is myopic, stupid, anti social and self defeating.
1. Perpetual congestion may well drive people out of their cars but it is not given, IMO unlikely that it would drive them to cycling. A motorcycle or scooter being more likely.
2. Such anti car attitudes are what make the majority ( and with good reason ) dislike cyclists and dismiss them as weirdos.
3. Congestion increases pollution which harms everyone which means YOU too.


andrewk: do tell us how you would propose to reduce congestion.


Firstly I am not a traffic planner, ministry of transport official or anything else with any professional link to the subject. So as a layman here goes:

1. There is no single silver bullet solution to congestion, I also suspect that no complete solution is possible. Rather the solution is one of lessening the problem and of mitigating its effects through many measures, each of which may contribute in a small way, ie. the salami slicing type solution.
2. The prime drivers of congestion are too many people concentrated in too small a geographic area, commuting and deliveries.
3. In the past there used to be something called regional policy that aimed to encourage businesses to move out of the capital, this was I beleive discontinued in the 80s. I think that such a policy should be reinstituted and not merely in order to ease congestion (which it would to a very small degree).
4. Outer London is not severely congested outside of the rush hour, congestion being caused primarilly by commuters, central London however, seems to be permanently congested. Home working for all or part of the week being technologically possible for many occupations ought to be encouraged as it could greatly ease congestion.
5. There seems to be a fashion for people to have their internet purchases delivered to their place of work. Were employers to ban such deliveries a great number of delivery vans would be taken off our most congested streets.
6. Shops could be restricted to accepting deliveries of stock overnight thus removing many vans and HGVs from our streets at peak times.
7. Build more motorways, widen and improve existing ones, increase motorway speed limits. The UK has the most congested motorways in Europe not because we have more cars but because we have the most inadequate trunk road network. We need to encourage through traffic off local roads.
8. Institute a high daily charge for lorries for entry to cities during working hours. The objective being to encourageHGVs to stick to by pass roads and ring roads and to restrict necessary city entry eg. deliveries to times outside of the working day.
9. Congestion charges for cars for entry to city centres (as presently in London), the daily charge probably needs to be raised a bit.
10. Further investment in public transport, preferably rail not bus.
11. More subsidy for public transport to create lower fares encouraging more use.
12. Encourage walking and cycling as a means of short distance transport.
13. Encourage and facilitate rail freight, get transport of bulk goods off the roads.

There you go...a top of my head answer, many other additional measures must also be possible.
by andrewk
28 Feb 2017, 12:19am
Forum: Campaigning & Public Policy
Topic: the benefits of congestion
Replies: 72
Views: 21814

Re: the benefits of congestion

Vorpal wrote:
So, it got me to thinking. What if congestion were terrible all the time. What if we limited traffic to a couple of main throughfares, and only allowed it off into residential areas for access. Would more people cycle? Just to get away from the nightmare traffic? Can we do an experiment somewhere with this? What is the tipping point at which people start to cycle? It is down to journey time?


Wishing congestion on others merely to promote cycling is myopic, stupid, anti social and self defeating.
1. Perpetual congestion may well drive people out of their cars but it is not given, IMO unlikely that it would drive them to cycling. A motorcycle or scooter being more likely.
2. Such anti car attitudes are what make the majority ( and with good reason ) dislike cyclists and dismiss them as weirdos.
3. Congestion increases pollution which harms everyone which means YOU too.
by andrewk
28 Feb 2017, 12:10am
Forum: On the road
Topic: Dont cycle in London as the police dont care if you get knocked off
Replies: 9
Views: 827

Re: Dont cycle in London as the police dont care if you get knocked off

atlas_shrugged wrote:
Speaking of which the officer in charge of the team murdering the innocent Brazilian on the tube has been promoted to lead the Met.


The Brazilian was NOT murdered, murder is a legal term with specific preconditions. Being unlawfully killed due to police error does not constitute murder.
Having said that I am less than content with the choice of Ms Dicks for reasons other than the incident involving the Brazilian.
by andrewk
31 Jan 2017, 1:30am
Forum: Does anyone know … ?
Topic: Want to start cycling, needs to some guidance on equipment
Replies: 27
Views: 1947

Re: Want to start cycling, needs to some guidance on equipment

£300 is a low budget but workable, try Decathlon who out compete other retailers on cheap bikes. A £300 bike is also a sensible starting point, it'll let you decide if you like it and figure out what type of bike you would really like. Helmets and cameras are optional. All you need is a bike, lights, good quality lock, pump and a multi tool. Everything else is optional.
Cycling is not nearly as dangerous as the public percetion of risk, in fact it is statistically very safe. Go buy a bike and just do it!
by andrewk
6 Jan 2017, 9:11pm
Forum: Campaigning & Public Policy
Topic: Cyclists demonised in paper, todays metro
Replies: 44
Views: 4883

Re: Cyclists demonised in paper, todays metro

The utility cyclist wrote:
This type of reporting will always fan the flames, we already know that people liken people on bikes to devils spawn.


And some (on this forum even) liken motorists to devils spawn.

Both positions are equally mistaken.
by andrewk
6 Jan 2017, 1:52am
Forum: On the road
Topic: 100 mile a day commute?
Replies: 95
Views: 14675

Re: 100 mile a day commute?

Elizabethsdad wrote:
andrewk wrote:I think that 100 miles per day is way too far for an ebike...they are restricted to 15.5mph, above that the assist switches off and one is left with a heavy bike. 15.5 mph is just too slow for the daily commute you envisage, ditto mopeds which are restricted to 28mph (and are not designed to do high milages).
An electric car would also be useless as it will be caught in traffic jams.
IMO the best solution is a motorbike or scooter. Basically 2 options: an old cheap but good quality 125, pros: cheap, v. low fuel consumption, cons: what you save on fuel you'll spend on maintenance (typically 3000 mile service intervals) unless you DIY.
2nd option: a bigger bike, (say a 250 / 300), still fuel efficient but better able to absorb higher milages and with longer service intervals. A scooter would give better weather protection than a motorbike.

I managed a 100 miles a week when I commuted on my e-bike. Take the charger with you and charge the battery up at work, and it only needs to have a 50 mile range.


The OP is looking to do 100 miles per day not 100 miles per week!
by andrewk
4 Jan 2017, 9:27pm
Forum: On the road
Topic: 100 mile a day commute?
Replies: 95
Views: 14675

Re: 100 mile a day commute?

I think that 100 miles per day is way too far for an ebike...they are restricted to 15.5mph, above that the assist switches off and one is left with a heavy bike. 15.5 mph is just too slow for the daily commute you envisage, ditto mopeds which are restricted to 28mph (and are not designed to do high milages).
An electric car would also be useless as it will be caught in traffic jams.
IMO the best solution is a motorbike or scooter. Basically 2 options: an old cheap but good quality 125, pros: cheap, v. low fuel consumption, cons: what you save on fuel you'll spend on maintenance (typically 3000 mile service intervals) unless you DIY.
2nd option: a bigger bike, (say a 250 / 300), still fuel efficient but better able to absorb higher milages and with longer service intervals. A scooter would give better weather protection than a motorbike.
by andrewk
3 Jan 2017, 11:41pm
Forum: Campaigning & Public Policy
Topic: CTC Travel Insurers Require Helmet
Replies: 39
Views: 12517

Re: CTC Travel Insurers Require Helmet

landsurfer wrote:Is the question ... Why do the CTC Ltd. recommend an insurer that is in conflict with its policies ..... surely CTC Ltd should remove recommendation from any insurer that demands the use of equipment not required by company regulations ?


Because in common with many charities they are less interested in recommending the best product or service than in generating commission or fee income.
by andrewk
3 Jan 2017, 11:30pm
Forum: On the road
Topic: Residents parking
Replies: 173
Views: 19130

Re: Residents parking

blackbike wrote:If on road parking is to be allowed on a street it should be available to everyone who can find a space, not reserved for people who just happen to live in houses on that street.

I see no good reason why councils should make parking easier for some people and harder for others. They should only control parking for reasons like stopping obstruction of traffic, not to give preferential access to public road space to a minority of people.


Guaranteed to NOT be elected were you to contest council elections.
by andrewk
3 Jan 2017, 3:48pm
Forum: On the road
Topic: Residents parking
Replies: 173
Views: 19130

Re: Residents parking

pete75 wrote:
andrewk wrote:
blackbike wrote:Residents parking schemes encourage car ownership and selfishness.

They are a bad idea.


An extreme view. At odds with public sentiment. You may dislike cars but the majority do not share your view...most people want a car of their own and somewhere convenient to park it. Residents' parking schemes are necessary in cities otherwise residential roads become clogged with commuters' vehicles with residents being unable to park. How is this selfish?


There's a simple answer - double yellow lines.

Those who want a convenient place to park a car should provide it at their own expense and off road.


1. They DO pay...many councils make a profit from exhorbitant residents' parking permits.

2. Other than wholesale demolition and replacement of much of the existing housing stock there is no way of providing off street parking for those without.
by andrewk
3 Jan 2017, 1:11am
Forum: On the road
Topic: Residents parking
Replies: 173
Views: 19130

Re: Residents parking

blackbike wrote:Residents parking schemes encourage car ownership and selfishness.

They are a bad idea.


An extreme view. At odds with public sentiment. You may dislike cars but the majority do not share your view...most people want a car of their own and somewhere convenient to park it. Residents' parking schemes are necessary in cities otherwise residential roads become clogged with commuters' vehicles with residents being unable to park. How is this selfish?
by andrewk
1 Jan 2017, 3:27am
Forum: On the road
Topic: Miles-in-a-year record broken by Kajsa Tylen
Replies: 25
Views: 3268

Re: well beat this?

A fantastic achievement of endurance but also indicative of an empty and pointless life.