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by mjr
16 Oct 2021, 10:07pm
Forum: The Tea Shop
Topic: National Trust Elections
Replies: 26
Views: 479

Re: National Trust Elections

oldtimer99 wrote: 16 Oct 2021, 7:03pm https://www.private-eye.co.uk/in-the-back

I was sent this a couple of weeks ago. Interesting reading
What's it got to do with the National Trust?
by mjr
16 Oct 2021, 10:00pm
Forum: On the road
Topic: Route 74 has gone
Replies: 66
Views: 1368

Re: Route 74 has gone

MikeF wrote: 16 Oct 2021, 8:01pm OSM frequently shows paths where there is no right of access. Using both OS and OSM can be helpful.
OS also shows many private tracks (black single or double lines). On OSM, you can query objects or enable the map data layer to check if a path is designated by law, if the visible layer doesn't make it clear (some don't, including the default I think). I don't know how you do that on OS.
by mjr
16 Oct 2021, 3:02pm
Forum: On the road
Topic: Route 74 has gone
Replies: 66
Views: 1368

Re: Route 74 has gone

MikeF wrote: 16 Oct 2021, 1:04pm
Spen wrote: 16 Oct 2021, 12:04pm
mjr wrote: 12 Oct 2021, 12:39pm Yes, it's the case. Sustrans base their maps on Ordnance Survey, which of course shows legal status more reliably than most OSM renders but does not show more practical matters like surface, status or route name. I do not know of any recent editing of OSM by Sustrans.
Ordnance Survey maps do not show the legal status of a path, they give an indication of the status but only the definitive map and statement held by the highway authority shows legal status, OS maps have a disclaimer on them for this reason
Indeed, but MJR didn't state that. OS use the definitive map, but as you note with a disclaimer. OSM use??????
OSM use our own surveys, traces of satellite imagery and, where made available, data dumps from the definitive map keepers. Someone (Ian maybe?) posted a link to a list of data sources earlier in this discussion.

I only said OS was currently more reliable on legal status, not that it was perfect or authoritative. There always seems to be someone on this site wanting to argue with anything

OSM is better on surface types, barriers and non-Sustrans cycle routes, which matter more to me.
by mjr
16 Oct 2021, 10:05am
Forum: The Tea Shop
Topic: How does the UK stop cutting off it's nose to spite it's face
Replies: 106
Views: 1453

Re: How does the UK stop cutting off it's nose to spite it's face

pwa wrote: 16 Oct 2021, 7:23am The only way the low paid in sectors like that will see their pay rise above the minimum wage is if the employers find it hard work filling vacancies. A plentiful supply of labour is bad news for anyone stacking shelves, cleaning floors or delivering parcels.
That's not the only way. For example, the workers could take some of the shares in company, so dividends go to the workers as well as investors, instead of putting them in opposition, but optimising pay becomes a different calculation too. There are other ways.

And if employers find it too expensive to fill vacancies, they will shut down, burn animals instead of butchering them, let crops rot in the field, leave massive retail barns empty, as we've seen. They will also threaten to do this to get local and national government to apply pressure on workers to accept the low pay, as we've seen.
by mjr
15 Oct 2021, 6:02pm
Forum: Touring & Expedition
Topic: Cycle friendly Wetherspoons
Replies: 446
Views: 38034

Re: Cycle friendly Wetherspoons

Sweep wrote: 15 Oct 2021, 5:36pm "poo-pub"?
are we in kindergarten?
It's a reference to viewtopic.php?p=1646183#p1646183
Just for you a pic of a bike in a spoons - they batted not an eyelid though it was pretty clean and just inside the door [...] Pub is in York- The Postern Gate. Fine pub in a nice spot.
Probably not the most objectionable thing to get taken in one. I can see on Streetview why you need to take your bike in there: there's no bike parking or signs to it outside, just a nice big car drop-off/pick-up layby. The usual car-friendly spoons.
by mjr
15 Oct 2021, 2:13pm
Forum: On the road
Topic: Route 74 has gone
Replies: 66
Views: 1368

Re: Route 74 has gone

mattheus wrote: 15 Oct 2021, 1:07pm I have to thank you for posting that. After reading earlier posts, I decided that would be a nice route to incorporate into my impending trip; I'd looked at a couple of bits on Streetview and it looked like a very rideable hard surface, and utterly scenic!

I shall stick with my standard strategy - proper tarmac, plus previously reccéd "cycle routes".
It depends what mood you're in. If you're willing to gamble, sometimes such a track will be in a far better condition than any photos or Streetview suggest and you will be rewarded with spectacular scenery rarely seen on any tarmac route anywhere...

...but it is a gamble, because sometimes it'll be a completely unrideable mess and so I think one has to allow for something like maybe 10kph average in case you're walking a lot of it, instead of my usual 16kph planning.

This year, I entered Grantham on the tarmac National Byway and left on the gravel canal towpath NCN. The towpath was much more enjoyable and actually less rough than some of the Byway inwards!

There are few certainties in cycle touring.

But if such a route was to be made part of a primary cycle route, there really should be a commitment to keep to pretty rideable IMO. No worse than rolled limestone smoothness. So that may also be why it remains as a second-level route, as well as the indirectness and climbing.
by mjr
15 Oct 2021, 2:03pm
Forum: The Tea Shop
Topic: National Trust Elections
Replies: 26
Views: 479

Re: National Trust Elections

ncutler wrote: 13 Oct 2021, 7:03pm Happily this is beginning to change, there is a growing realisation that a fearless and honest history of who we all are is the foundation required for a decent and democratic nation. I don't expect to arrive there in my lifetime, but for those of you who are younger a decent future is worth fighting for.
I think it has long been changing. The National Trust acquired the George Inn in Southwark in 1937, Mr Straw's House in the 1980s and the Southwell Workhouse (Notts) in the 1990s. More recently, they've bought places like 575 Wandsworth Road in 2010, and started to populate the servant rooms at grand houses with more rounded stories of the people who worked there. The histories less told are among the NT properties if you want them, but it's often the grand houses like Oxburgh which get the headlines and map symbols.

It'll probably get there, maybe after we've gone, but sooner if a load of aristo-slaver-worshipping throwbacks don't take over the Trust as the latest front in their so-called "culture war".
by mjr
15 Oct 2021, 12:08pm
Forum: The Tea Shop
Topic: How does the UK stop cutting off it's nose to spite it's face
Replies: 106
Views: 1453

Re: How does the UK stop cutting off it's nose to spite it's face

pwa wrote: 15 Oct 2021, 11:09am The word "Guardian" puts me off. [...]
That's shooting the messenger. It publishes some good stuff and some dross, by some good authors (David Olusoga to name one with a current high profile) and some not so good.
Just as I don't read the DM or anything on that side either.
I'm not sure what side you think the Scott Trust is on, but rest assured that it is deeply liberal, not socialist!
by mjr
15 Oct 2021, 11:59am
Forum: The Tea Shop
Topic: How does the UK stop cutting off it's nose to spite it's face
Replies: 106
Views: 1453

Re: How does the UK stop cutting off it's nose to spite it's face

pwa wrote: 15 Oct 2021, 7:41am
PH wrote: 15 Oct 2021, 12:10am Start with a clear understanding of how we got here. There's no way forward without it.
I believe us leaving the EU is the end result of a failure of Westminster and the EU itself, over decades, to create something that the overwhelming majority of the UK population could be comfortable with. I know there are folk here who were happy with it, but that wasn't enough. It needed a solid majority in favour and it didn't sustain that. Absolving the EU itself from some of the blame is just head in the sand stuff. If we want to get to the root of it (and I'm not sure I can be bothered even thinking about it anymore) you have to look there too. Not to do so is to be in a state of denial.
I think the above beliefs which are almost completely unsupported by evidence is also being in a state of denial. We need to face facts: the top reasons for voting Leave (subsidiarity, migration controls and pausing EU expansion) were not anything that were really prevented by EU membership.

The stuff that's come up afterwards, like Lord Frost's latest quibbling over exactly which foreign court rules over the EUUK relationship, are beloved of the policy wonks in CCHQ but did not figure large in the public's reasons for voting.

Also, criticising the UK is criticising the EU because the UK was part of it. There was no "the EU" as a disconnected distant object. The continued myth that it was somehow remote and beyond our influence, more so than Whitehall, hints at a serious failure in civil education in this country.
One mistake that was made was allowing free movement of labour for folk living in the poorer East European states too soon. Mistakes made by both the EU and Westminster there.
Mainly by Westminster. It was possible to do it more gradually under EU rules but the government of the day chose not to. That was a mistake, ultimately, even if I am unconvinced that it was responsible for all the ills you blame on it.

We are seeing now that bosses would rather destroy their products than pay workers more... and there are legitimate questions about whether dumbly raising pay risks leading back to 1970s-style "stagflation" if there are not market structural changes of the sort which the current government shows no sign of making, with "build back better" appearing to be a slogan not a policy.
by mjr
14 Oct 2021, 4:25pm
Forum: Touring & Expedition
Topic: Cycle friendly Wetherspoons
Replies: 446
Views: 38034

Re: Cycle friendly Wetherspoons

Sweep wrote: 14 Oct 2021, 3:59pm Certain lack of real-world logic in your fear I fear.
Any views on leaving a bike outside london's Ritz?
Not brill, but I'd be happier leaving a bike in the Ritz than in the poo-pub.

I've not actually left a bike in the Ritz but I think I've left a folding bike in the cloakroom of The Clermont Charing Cross which isn't far away.
by mjr
14 Oct 2021, 4:20pm
Forum: On the road
Topic: Route 74 has gone
Replies: 66
Views: 1368

Re: Route 74 has gone

prestavalve wrote: 14 Oct 2021, 3:38pm
mjr wrote: I think that is a false impression.
When on-road sections of the NCN are being de-listed for no obvious reason, other than that they are "on a road", why is this a false impression?
Because other on-road sections have remained, so clearly "on a road" wasn't the criteria for delisting... or if it is, they've really messed up on an easily-verifiable fact. Some of the remaining roads are nastier or busier than some of what's been delisted or downgraded.

As far as I've been able to find out from them, other campaigners and highways officers, Sustrans didn't consult or even warn anyone before breaking up the NCN and now they refuse to explain, so it's very difficult for anyone to figure out if their actions make any sense, if they're justified or not, what errors they made and how the heck we best move forwards.
by mjr
14 Oct 2021, 4:12pm
Forum: Racing, Olympics, TdF, Competitive cycling
Topic: TdeF 2022
Replies: 5
Views: 168

Re: TdeF 2022

Hellhound wrote: 14 Oct 2021, 3:17pm The Womens Tour is hardly a Tour of France is it :roll:
That's always going to be a problem for any new race. Even with the Tour of France starting with more stages than the Tour of Britain is allowed, it's still only 8 stages, so they have to choose between long transfers and only using part of the country. It's a reasonable mix for a first attempt, isn't it?
They could run them both at the same time and I can't see any reason not to!
One will always end up as the ugly sibling and I can't see the men standing for that!
by mjr
14 Oct 2021, 3:09pm
Forum: Racing, Olympics, TdF, Competitive cycling
Topic: TdeF 2022
Replies: 5
Views: 168

Re: TdeF 2022

The women's Tour also has a 175km stage, which is more than the UCI 160km limit. The Giro was told of for a 170km stage and the Tour of Britain stopped short at 155km. Interesting.

In the men's event, the three days along the French-Belgian border look interesting for spectators visiting from the UK. Here's hoping the virus doesn't keep on being troublesome!
by mjr
14 Oct 2021, 3:03pm
Forum: Touring & Expedition
Topic: Europe 2021
Replies: 857
Views: 23190

Re: Europe 2021

willem jongman wrote: 14 Oct 2021, 1:50pm The EU app has a line of moving people underneath the QR code. You cannot copy that.
I have copied lots of animations. That does not seem secure.

What makes the EU app secure is the public key cryptography in the QR code, similar to the NHS one. When a scanner app scans it, a chain of approvals can be checked and it leads to some official body that is willing to say that they believe the person holding whatever identity document has been vaccinated/tested/whatever. That can then be combined with a simpler identity check which places like bars already need to check someone's age.
Just imagine what it would have taken to set up a paper based system for the entire EU. There would not be enough secure printing facilties for a start and it would have involved a multitude of physical operations precisely when we wanted to avoid those for risk of contamination.
Yes, the paper saving alone justifies a display app IMO. But a paper print of a QR code can still be used contactless for verification by a scanner app, reducing contamination opportunity.
by mjr
14 Oct 2021, 2:54pm
Forum: On the road
Topic: Route 74 has gone
Replies: 66
Views: 1368

Re: Route 74 has gone

prestavalve wrote: 14 Oct 2021, 1:59pm I am as green as the guy on the sweetcorn tin: lived car free my whole life. Currently do a 50km daily commute, most often using a busy A road over an NCR because the latter is indirect and slow, making it impractical for transport.

I am not disabled, but, I do cart my daughter around in a Burly and appreciate some of the issues experienced by people with mobility problems - when she's hooked up, my options of where I can go and how fast I can get there shrink massively.
And do you think that any of that cycling is a good situation? (well, maybe except the part of the reduction in how fast which isn't due to bad design or implementation) Is that really how cycling should be in a country trying to get to grips with pollution, climate change and a multifaceted health crisis?

Why do you think anyone else would switch to cycling in that situation?
Neither of these things cause me to agree with the prevailing attitude, which seems to be gathering weight, that bespoke cycling infrastructure is somehow a necessary precondition for cycling to occur.
I think that is a false impression. Of course it's not a necessary precondition, else no-one would be cycling now. You wouldn't be riding the old A74. I wouldn't have grown up riding along the A5. And so on. There will always be a few die-hards who keep riding in even very hostile roadscapes. Probably even if we were legally prohibited from them and there was no reasonable alternative.

The problem is that we are a minority. We are not sufficient.

The argument (as I understand it) is that some accommodations in road design and network management are required to enable majority cycling, and there are also some which would encourage more cycling. Who says that any of it is a prerequisite for any cycling, except as hyperbole?
Neither do they stop me from poking fun at the moist vision of the "ideal new cyclist" which saturates campaigns to the point where it has become a parody of itself.
I don't recognise that vision, so it just looks like an attack on the characteristics mentioned, some of which seems discriminatory.