Search found 14197 matches

by pwa
26 Oct 2021, 5:32pm
Forum: The Tea Shop
Topic: Sir David Amess MP. RIP
Replies: 103
Views: 1728

Re: Sir David Amess MP. RIP

Hellhound wrote: 25 Oct 2021, 7:24pm
pwa wrote: 25 Oct 2021, 3:12pm
Hellhound wrote: 25 Oct 2021, 3:07pm

It's only words.
I don't understand why people get so worked up about some idiot(s) trolling them on Social Media :roll:
I have Facebook,Instagram and Twitter and would not use any if I thought anything on them would affect my mental health.

Some people are just not cut out for the internet :lol: :lol: :lol:
Surely stepping away from a hostile environment is a rational thing to do unless you enjoy constant spats.
Step away,yes,if that's what you want to do but publicly stating you're deleting your account is just attention seeking IMO.Celebs seem to do it quite often and then return.
A bit like stating you are leaving the Forum then coming back a few weeks later :roll:
99% of the time it's not 'hostile' anyway it's just banter :roll:
It is a choice all of us face at one time or another, though, whether to continue or to give it up as a waste of time and more trouble than it is worth. I have stepped away from this Forum in the past, thinking I might not return, but then returned when I had cooled down and set myself some new rules about how I do or don't communicate with others. But for a public figure some sort of public explanation would be expected.
by pwa
25 Oct 2021, 3:12pm
Forum: The Tea Shop
Topic: Sir David Amess MP. RIP
Replies: 103
Views: 1728

Re: Sir David Amess MP. RIP

Hellhound wrote: 25 Oct 2021, 3:07pm
thirdcrank wrote: 25 Oct 2021, 2:37pm Sir David Amess: Priest quits social media over MP last rites abuse
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-essex-59036023
Social media are not for the faint-hearted.
It's only words.
I don't understand why people get so worked up about some idiot(s) trolling them on Social Media :roll:
I have Facebook,Instagram and Twitter and would not use any if I thought anything on them would affect my mental health.

Some people are just not cut out for the internet :lol: :lol: :lol:
Surely stepping away from a hostile environment is a rational thing to do unless you enjoy constant spats.
by pwa
25 Oct 2021, 3:07pm
Forum: Does anyone know … ?
Topic: ...how to solve a very first world (steel) bike problem...
Replies: 28
Views: 1738

Re: ...how to solve a very first world (steel) bike problem...

Vorpal wrote: 21 Oct 2021, 10:24am
nomm wrote: 16 Oct 2021, 2:42pm Thanks for all the advice - turns out a large factor has been my PSI - my pump pressure gage was miles off, meaning I was running a much higher PSI than I had wanted
Brucey always advised folks not to use the pressure gauges on pumps, but a separate pressure gauge, for this reason. Pump gauges are not especially reliable.

I use the pressure gauge on my pump, but I do check it against a separate gauge periodically.

I'm glad it was something simple, anyway!
I use the gauge on my track pump to get the pressures (front and rear) that I know to be comfortable and efficient. I know what the readings for those are on my pump, but I have no idea how those readings relate to the actual pressure level. And it doesn't matter, since I get the pressures I like, even if I'm not sure what they would actually be on an accurate gauge.
by pwa
25 Oct 2021, 2:51pm
Forum: The Tea Shop
Topic: Anyone for Gas?
Replies: 222
Views: 4565

Re: Anyone for Gas?

slowster wrote: 25 Oct 2021, 2:40pm
pwa wrote: 25 Oct 2021, 1:37pm Insulate Britain are irrelevant to me because I set about getting as much insulation as possible into our house when we moved in twenty odd years ago.
I think the issue that Insulate Britain is protesting about is relevant to every one of us.

Firstly, because it doesn't matter what we each do if UK housing overall continues to require excessively large and wasteful amounts of energy to heat it. That unnecessary and avoidable higher demand results in higher prices for all, and for many of the most vulnerable it will result in (increasing) fuel poverty. That will result in a return to the bad old days of more elderly people having to choose between heating or eating, and regular reports of deaths each winter/cold snap because they could not afford to heat their homes properly.

Secondly, the scope for people to improve the insulation and air tightness of their homes to the degree that is probably essential in the medium to longer term*, is greatly limited by the nature of our existing housing stock. Much of our housing is of poor quality construction, but more crucially the designs are very difficult/impossible to upgrade to the sort of super energy efficient housing that is likely to be needed, i.e. based on currently available and commercially viable technology. Adding more loft insulation, fitting new/better double glazing etc. is not going to be anywhere near sufficient. Heat is lost from homes like water from a bucket with holes, and to make the performance improvement required every one of those holes has to be identified and effectively sealed. The commercial sector currently cannot deliver that: it does not have suitable technological solutions to offer which can be delivered at scale, installed relatively quickly, and at an acceptable price. Only Government is in a position to make a difference to this, e.g. by funding research and development work by academics and the Building Research Establihment etc. For the last 10 to 20 years Governments have simply not been doing that (certainly not to the extent needed). Hence it is probably in all our interests that Insulate Britain succeeds in persuading the current Government to direct far more resources and effort into the field.

* Essential not just to meet carbon reduction targets, but also to ensure that the UK is much less vulnerable to large increases in the cost of energy and/or reductions in the supply of energy. For example, the UK only gets 5% of its gas from Russia, but much of the rest of Europe depends heavily on Russian gas, and if the price is increased then that would result in the price of other forms of energy increasing across Europe, including the UK.
I appreciate that it is just a matter of personal opinion, but from where I am standing it looks like Insulate Britain is at most an irritant, likely to make some folk dig their heels in and dismiss the need for change. But there are a couple of real levers for positive change. One is the ever increasing presence of Climate Change in mainstream news. The other is the certainty that methane burning is going to get dearer and dearer. I think those two, together, will produce a move towards a greener future. The only questions are how long it will take, and how much it will cost.

I appreciate mjr's assurances about noise from AS heat pumps, and I too wish the makers could get their act together and make them nicer to look at.
by pwa
25 Oct 2021, 1:48pm
Forum: The Tea Shop
Topic: British Rivers
Replies: 7
Views: 181

Re: British Rivers

A mile or so from me is a lovely little stream that flows through a village then down to the sea a mile further on, and Welsh Water haven't yet managed to keep that clear of sewage when rainfall is very high. The problem is where rainwater and sewage end up in the same pipe, which then exceeds capacity when it rains a lot then overflows. I am 60 years old and it has been happening my whole life.

So don't refill your bidon here:
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Blaen ... 4?hl=en-GB
by pwa
25 Oct 2021, 1:37pm
Forum: The Tea Shop
Topic: Anyone for Gas?
Replies: 222
Views: 4565

Re: Anyone for Gas?

mjr wrote: 25 Oct 2021, 11:23am
......What have others done to improve efficiency recently, especially those who like to criticise Insulate Britain?
Insulate Britain are irrelevant to me because I set about getting as much insulation as possible into our house when we moved in twenty odd years ago. Our last halogen bulb is a 12v one in the downstairs bathroom and it is only there because if I change it to LED, like the other five in that room, they all fail to work. The others have been LED for years, like every other bulb in the house. Double glazing all round, again for twenty years, some renewed a couple of years back. Thick curtains, including across the front door. And plenty of furniture. Furniture takes up space that would otherwise need heating. Carpeted floors in the large living room makes it feel warmer underfoot. But recently I have begun pondering what comes after gas. Wood pellets? Air source heat pump? I have no idea where I would put the outside gubbins for one of those. I wouldn't want in near a neighbour's windows, so that probably means along the back of my house. But every part of that is already occupied with something. Maybe on the front, hidden with shrubbery. I could imagine solar on our roof, even though we are not facing the right way for optimal capture.
by pwa
24 Oct 2021, 5:20pm
Forum: Bikes & Bits – Technical section
Topic: Brompton steering geometry
Replies: 16
Views: 401

Re: Brompton steering geometry

The only thing a newcomer to Bromptons needs to know is that compared to most non-race bikes the steering is sensitive to inputs. One way to adjust for this is to steer by leaning rather than by turning the bar, except at low speeds. Once you get used to it, it ceases to be an issue.
by pwa
24 Oct 2021, 2:56pm
Forum: The Tea Shop
Topic: Covid Booster. Yes/No?
Replies: 131
Views: 2290

Re: Covid Booster. Yes/No?

Hellhound wrote: 23 Oct 2021, 11:21pm Not a cop out at all.
I am not playing this game anymore.There is no point to it.Those that want to can carry on but I'm moving on and getting on with my life.It's here,like many other virus,so that's it.Live with it.
The Govt are bored with it,the media are bored with it as it's not killing enough to be news worthy and I'm bored with it.
The more people who think like you and give up on keeping their antibody level up through boosters, the less we will all be able to move on. I don't understand how you cannot see that the small inconvenience of keeping your vaccination status up to date is the thing that will minimise the need for other measures and allow us all to put this behind us. If people don't get vaccinated and then keep up with boosters we will not free our hospitals of Covid patients and we will not have beds free for us when we need them for other things. I have had the two jabs and intend keeping up with boosters when they are offered, much as I intend keeping up with routine dentistry and eye checks. It is my way of maximising the chance of moving on, of drawing a line under it. Your approach, if enough people do the same, will just drag it out.
by pwa
23 Oct 2021, 7:40pm
Forum: The Tea Shop
Topic: Covid Booster. Yes/No?
Replies: 131
Views: 2290

Re: Covid Booster. Yes/No?

Hellhound wrote: 23 Oct 2021, 6:39pm
reohn2 wrote: 19 Oct 2021, 8:41pm Hellbound
What do you mean by moving on?
Read into it what you will.
The whole point of the vaccines is that they allow us to move on. Why give up at this point? It is because of the vaccines that pubs are now open, kids are mostly in school and people are moving about freely. But there is still work to be done if we are to get through the winter without too much disruption. We want hospitals to be freed to deal with the backlog of hip replacements, cancer treatment etc. That would be "moving on". If we allow antibody levels to drop too far we will slip back into needing lockdowns and having to postpone operations. So let's get whatever jabs are offered so that we can move on.

Declining a booster when offered doesn't sound like moving on. It sounds like standing still and waiting for Covid to catch up with you. Why be so passive when you don't have to?
by pwa
23 Oct 2021, 5:27pm
Forum: The Tea Shop
Topic: Sir David Amess MP. RIP
Replies: 103
Views: 1728

Re: Sir David Amess MP. RIP

Psamathe wrote: 23 Oct 2021, 5:02pm
pwa wrote: 23 Oct 2021, 3:49pm
DaveReading wrote: 21 Oct 2021, 9:58am
No, not necessarily.

For example Roman Catholics believe that suicide is a sin. So a Catholic couldn't possibly be a Samaritan, could they, since the latter believe that people have the right to find their own solution, even if that includes suicide ?

And yet a fair number of Sams are indeed Roman Catholics - the deal for a volunteer is that when you're answering the phone, or emails, or sitting face-to-face with a caller, you leave your religious beliefs at the door.

It's no different for a politician.
Some Roman Catholics believe suicide is a sin and some don't. A lot of them find their church's view on contraception comical, so don't stick to that either. You make the outsiders' mistake of seeing them as a bloc with one view on everything. Just because the Pope says something is so, doesn't mean every Catholic accepts it. It is a person's own personal religious views that shape their values, not the official line of their church.

I did once know a church-going RC lady who volunteered for the Samaritans and she seemed to me to be just the sort of person you would want on the other end of the line if you were having a hard time. And she wasn't dogmatic.
....
How much "cherry picking" are Catholics permitted to still be considered Catholic by the church? If you attend church regularly, do confession, but reject the contraception bit is that OK? What about if you reject the existance of God, still OK? At what point do you cease to be a Catholic and become just somebody who believes in God (or doesn't)?

Ian
In practice the individual decides for himself / herself. Perhaps Sir David had views on what you have to believe in to be a Catholic, or perhaps he didn't. I don't know. I know a couple of Catholics who definitely do have views on what you have to sign up to, but I know others who think you can do a pick and mix so long as you subscribe to some very basic things such as believing in Jesus Christ as the son of God, who rose from the dead. I don't know any who reject that. But on other stuff, like contraception, there has always been dissent. I have known Catholics with some pretty liberal views on many social matters. David Amess seems to have been in the strict, hard line camp.
by pwa
23 Oct 2021, 4:30pm
Forum: The Tea Shop
Topic: Covid Booster. Yes/No?
Replies: 131
Views: 2290

Re: Covid Booster. Yes/No?

Here in Wales we still have some of the measures that would be part of Plan B if it were to be activated in England, and they ain't working. We have compulsory mask wearing in shops, some other public indoor spaces and on public transport, but Covid rates are still very high. Don't expect a big improvement if compulsory mask wearing in some venues is brought back in England.
by pwa
23 Oct 2021, 3:49pm
Forum: The Tea Shop
Topic: Sir David Amess MP. RIP
Replies: 103
Views: 1728

Re: Sir David Amess MP. RIP

DaveReading wrote: 21 Oct 2021, 9:58am
pwa wrote: 21 Oct 2021, 5:27amI have no "faith", but for people who do, it is part of who they are and how they see the world. It is where their "values" are shaped. So indirectly their faith will inevitably be behind their views. How could it be otherwise?
No, not necessarily.

For example Roman Catholics believe that suicide is a sin. So a Catholic couldn't possibly be a Samaritan, could they, since the latter believe that people have the right to find their own solution, even if that includes suicide ?

And yet a fair number of Sams are indeed Roman Catholics - the deal for a volunteer is that when you're answering the phone, or emails, or sitting face-to-face with a caller, you leave your religious beliefs at the door.

It's no different for a politician.
Some Roman Catholics believe suicide is a sin and some don't. A lot of them find their church's view on contraception comical, so don't stick to that either. You make the outsiders' mistake of seeing them as a bloc with one view on everything. Just because the Pope says something is so, doesn't mean every Catholic accepts it. It is a person's own personal religious views that shape their values, not the official line of their church.

I did once know a church-going RC lady who volunteered for the Samaritans and she seemed to me to be just the sort of person you would want on the other end of the line if you were having a hard time. And she wasn't dogmatic.

But from the little I know of him, Amess may have been "old school".
by pwa
21 Oct 2021, 5:27am
Forum: The Tea Shop
Topic: Sir David Amess MP. RIP
Replies: 103
Views: 1728

Re: Sir David Amess MP. RIP

pete75 wrote: 20 Oct 2021, 6:33pm
No one said they should be excluded but they should keep those beliefs out of political decision making.
I have no "faith", but for people who do, it is part of who they are and how they see the world. It is where their "values" are shaped. So indirectly their faith will inevitably be behind their views. How could it be otherwise?

Amess was a Catholic, but I should point out that his variety of Catholic is far from being the only type. I know RCs who are a lot more liberal in their views.

I'm sorry Amess was murdered, and I hope his killer gets locked away for life. But I'm not going to pretend that I would have voted for Amess if he had been standing in our constituency. I probably wouldn't. Too many of his views clash with my own. I don't think it is disrespectful to say that. But I very much regret that an MP has had their accessibility exploited by someone who does not respect democracy, or the right of people to have alternative views to their own. Cox and Amess were very different people, but both were killed while doing a job for us.
by pwa
21 Oct 2021, 5:11am
Forum: The Tea Shop
Topic: Sir David Amess MP. RIP
Replies: 103
Views: 1728

Re: Sir David Amess MP. RIP

pliptrot wrote: 20 Oct 2021, 8:36am
pwa wrote: 20 Oct 2021, 6:28am A person can be anti-abortion without being a bad person. All that is required is a belief that there are two human lives involved in a pregnancy, not just one.
No they can't. It is one life involved - the woman's. Her choice, her body, her life.
You take a stance there, which leads you down a particular path. Fine. But your stance is not the only possible stance a well meaning and thoughtful person could take. A kind and thoughtful person could also take a stance based on a belief that a pregnant woman and her unborn child are both human lives, and both worthy of consideration. I'm not suggesting that you should think that way, but that you should try to understand how someone else might think that way without being a bad person.
by pwa
20 Oct 2021, 6:28am
Forum: The Tea Shop
Topic: Sir David Amess MP. RIP
Replies: 103
Views: 1728

Re: Sir David Amess MP. RIP

pete75 wrote: 20 Oct 2021, 1:43am
fullfathom5 wrote: 19 Oct 2021, 3:33pm
Debs wrote: 19 Oct 2021, 2:58pm In a democratic society it's paramount to vote right wing politicians out of office. Murdering them is totally abhorrent.
It will be interesting to learn who exactly this murderer is and his warped reasoning...

However we now have a situation which involves the outpouring of sympathy over the criminal death of a very rightwing Brexit-Tory politician who apart from the only one good bone in his body on animal rights, stood for ERG Brexit extremes, supported the return of the death penalty, was a staunch homophobe with his past HoC voting record always voting against GBLT rights, also voted to enshrine sexist Roman Catholic medieval dogma into UK law with banning of abortion rights.

It is very tragic that he was killed while carrying out his democratic duties, and i really do have sympathetic to his family and friends, but i wish the media would stop the puke-bucket non-stop sending him up as Saint David the perfect on the big white horse.

Mr Nice-Guy he was not.
Have you ever considered that somebody can have different views to your own without being 'bad'?
The more I hear about him the worse he seems. In favour of capital punishment, homophobic, hard line member of the ERG, anti abortion and the leading parliamentary apologist for the repulsive Qatari regime, holidaying there a couple of times at the regime's expense.
It's looking like the Qatar connection may be the reason he was killed.

He certainly didn't come out of the parliamentary expenses claims very well either, claiming money for overnight hotel stays in London even though taxpayers were paying his rent on a London house and this despite him owning a London home which he rented out.
A person can be anti-abortion without being a bad person. All that is required is a belief that there are two human lives involved in a pregnancy, not just one. But on the other points, yes, some unattractive stuff there.