Search found 189 matches

by pedals2slowly
20 Jun 2021, 11:34am
Forum: Does anyone know … ?
Topic: Recumbent and Upright Combination Tandem
Replies: 15
Views: 1298

Re: Recumbent and Upright Combination Tandem

I used to have one to enable my late wife to continue riding whilst only pedalling occasionally.
We tested the Circe Morpheus and Hase Pino at Gargrave.
We tried the Circe first and I just thought no way can I ride a thing like this, far too flexible and unwieldy, in comparison the Hase Pino whilst very different to a conventional tandem or solo is acceptable and after getting used to it happy to fly around corners and downhill.
We fitted a rear wheel electric motor eventually as front power decreased and only stopped when I was eventually unable to physically get her on and off the front seat (The front stand is only just about strong enough for a 80 kilo rider)
Great fun, a wonderful talking piece and when ridden solo you have a great seat for sitting at the roadside watching the Tour de France go by!
by pedals2slowly
18 Jun 2021, 4:33pm
Forum: Cycling UK Member Groups and Affiliates
Topic: Ride Leader Training
Replies: 3
Views: 1604

Re: Ride Leader Training

chris_suffolk wrote: 18 Jun 2021, 4:12pm Why on earth would you need a course to 'teach' you how to lead a group ride?

I'm in a FB group, and rides are orgainsied by people on a regular basis. Nobody (to my knowledge) has done a course to show them how to do it, and we've never had a problem. People respect that it's been organised by a given person, and then respect the speed, route, stops etc that that person wants to do. If some (part way round) want to do their own thing, then that's fine, they just leave the group after letting people know.

All nice and amicable, even between people who have never met or riden together before, and never had an issue. On a personal level, I'd deliberately avoid any groups that tried to tell me 'how it must be done' by sending me on a course.
Our club and I are exactly the same, we've had lead rides since the late 1800's and I've lead CTC rides for 40 years.
However we are open minded and found that there are lots of people who don't have the confidence to lead a ride and are encouraged to do so having done a course.
VERY experienced ride leaders have attended a course with an open mind and have learned how to improve their rides and enjoy them more knowing the riders enjoy them more as well. Contrary to popular belief you can teach and old dog new tricks.
by pedals2slowly
18 Jun 2021, 3:31pm
Forum: Cycling UK Member Groups and Affiliates
Topic: Ride Leader Training
Replies: 3
Views: 1604

Ride Leader Training

I'm looking at a 'Club Leader Course' manual and have been part of a couple of CUK Ride Leader courses over the last few years.
The cost of a one day course is about £120 per attendee, with 6 members at a time CUK charges around £720 per day.
My affiliated club has plenty of funds to pay for this but member group could not.
However from my experience of commercial courses this rate seems 50% too high for the type of course being provided.
In addition I find the course manual full of errors (Despite being a mature document several years old) and the course tutors lacking in knowledge of the finer aspects of course content.

Do any other forum members have any experience of these courses and can they offer any advice- for example is the British Cycling course any good (it is cheaper)
by pedals2slowly
3 Sep 2020, 10:26pm
Forum: Bikes & Bits – Technical section
Topic: Schwalbe Marathon Plus Tour Tyre
Replies: 28
Views: 1103

Re: Schwalbe Marathon Plus Tour Tyre

The 'Smartguard' on the marathon plus means the tread is more rigid than the side walls.
The result of this is that as you lean over the tyre 'flops' or distorts, it feels as if you are riding on a square section tyre.
If you ride slowly and corner gently it probably wouldn't be a problem.
Stick to the lighter and easier to remove and repair non-plus versions, the tread and sidewalls are more similar in stiffness and so you don't get the 'square tyre' feel.
by pedals2slowly
20 Aug 2020, 1:46pm
Forum: Does anyone know … ?
Topic: Changing disks and pads
Replies: 29
Views: 964

Re: Changing disks and pads

It's a good price and yes the discs look fine, after a few bites the pads contact area with the discs will be maxed and all will be well
by pedals2slowly
20 Aug 2020, 9:08am
Forum: Does anyone know … ?
Topic: Bestest ever bicycle brakes... ?
Replies: 129
Views: 4347

Re: Bestest ever bicycle brakes... ?

Brucey wrote: I have not read your 'reply'


Good old social media eh?
by pedals2slowly
19 Aug 2020, 10:41pm
Forum: Bikes & Bits – Technical section
Topic: Yet another reason to avoid carbon frames
Replies: 278
Views: 10500

Re: Yet another reason to avoid carbon frames

fastpedaller wrote:I'm not necessarily impressed by holders of ISO 9001 and similar


Very sensible, there are plenty of ISO9001 companies who talk the talk but don't walk the walk, and plenty of duff ISO9001 certs.
But ISO9001 is the starting point whereby a company would have to prove it has sources the correct certified material, have mill traceability for metals and I assume similar for carbon fibre, also show it's production processes were consistent, customer complaints adequately dealt with and continuous improvement proven.
by pedals2slowly
19 Aug 2020, 10:34pm
Forum: Does anyone know … ?
Topic: Bestest ever bicycle brakes... ?
Replies: 129
Views: 4347

Re: Bestest ever bicycle brakes... ?

Wow, I seem to have stirred a hornet's nest!

Brucey wrote:
pedals2slowly wrote:If you did a table of pro's and con's, gave value judgements with numbers and added up the scores, disc brakes would beat all other brakes hands down.


I disagree; they have many shortcomings including

- susceptibility to contamination UNLIKE RIMS BRAKES ON A MUDDY TRACK THEN??? :lol:
- lag in the wet (so inconsistent in action, but not in a predictable way(*)) NO DIFFERENT TO RIM BRAKES
- rapid pad wear in the wet LESS THAN RIM BRAKES!!!!
- vulnerability to accidental damage NO (CANTIS' ARE FAR WORSE)
- maintenance hungry YES - MINOR NO - MAJOR
- not designed for UK conditions (I have yet to see one that definitely won't fail in a couple of UK winters) MUCH BETTER THAN RIM BRAKES
- imposes unnecessary loads on fork, hub bearings, hub, and spokes 'UNNECESSARY'??
- weigh more than rim brakes ACCEPTED BUT NOT SIGNIFICANT FOR MOST USERS
- risk of accidental injury from disc in accident VERY UNLIKELY IN NORMAL CYCLING
- risk of accidental burns from hot discs when you climb off the bike HOW MANY PEOPLE TOUCH THEIR DISCS???
- discs make wheel maintenance more difficult NO
- dished front wheels are necessary with disc brakes, which means weaker/heavier wheels ACCEPTED BUT NOT SIGNIFICANT FOR MAJORITY OF USERS
- huge and pointless variation in pad designs means sourcing spare pads is needlessly difficult (cf rim brake where two brake block fitments would cover >95% of bikes) ACCEPTED BUT...........HA HA - MULTITUDE OF FITTINGS REQUIRED ACROSS CANTI/V/CALIPERS
- similar proliferation of caliper mount designs leads to even more built-in obsolescence ACCEPTED BUT NOT SIGNIFICANT FOR MOST BUYERS
- lack of spare parts for most disc systems means failure of trivial parts (eg seals) leads to scrappage of the system ACCEPTED BUT NOT SIGNIFICANT FOR MOST BUYERS
- wheel retention problems NO
- 'quick release' wheels are not 'quick release' any more with disc brakes QR WHEELS WITH DISCS ARE FINE
- endless problems with disc rub 'SOME' NOT 'ENDLESS'
- wheel changes often cause problems and that is if they work at all, such is the variety of disc sizes and exact alignments ACCEPTED BUT VERY FEW PEOPLE CHANGE WHEELS
- disc systems have several ways in which they can fail completely and without any warning whatsoever NO
- disc pad friction coefficients vary with pad temperature such that you have to be able to modulate the brake power in a wide variety of situations. JUST LIKE RIM BRAKES IN DIFFERENT WEATHER CONDITIONS THEN


and that is just off the top of my head; plenty more of that to come..... 'Best'...? I asked 'best for what?' upthread but in any event for many purposes.....discs are best...? I don't think so! There is plenty of room for improvement and there are other brakes which do not share some of these unwanted attributes. Horses for courses! BUT THE OTHER BRAKES LOSE OUT IN SO MANY OTHER WAYS

(*) Of their many flaws I consider this to be the most serious, in combination with the thing that sells these brakes to those who perhaps have not thought through all the consequences, being brake power. I've mentioned this before but from about 15-20mph you should be aiming to have the brakes on for a little over one second to bring yourself to a halt in an emergency, if you have powerful brakes. And in an emergency this will be 'cold', i.e. you have to be able to put the brakes on 'blind' and get maximum retardation in the first half a second, i.e. before you will have time to react to the actual state of the brakes and be able to usefully modulate them. In this situation brakes that are sometimes massively powerful are nothing but a hinderance; you cannot apply them 'full gas' without risking going over the bars (and you will go over the bars before you can react; I have seen it happen). If you apply at some lower force, react and then modulate up to full power then that is no good either, you won't go over the bars but you will probably exceed the minimum stopping distance before you even modulate the brakes to full power. Worse than that should the brakes be wet practically nothing will happen for about half a second (or more), with a similar effect on stopping distance. [Wet rim brakes may even come 'on' quicker than some discs because the rim brakes will be applied 'full gas' and the disc brakes not.] YOU ARE STARTING TO SOUND LIKE RICHARD HALLETT NOW BUT EVEN HE SEEMS TO BE LESS ANTI-DISC BRAKES THESE DAYS

So disc brakes may give an illusion of power, control etc but in a emergency when you really need that power, you can't use it safely/swiftly and they are often worse in actual result to supposedly inferior brakes. SO WRONG

The 'morer is always betterer' mantra is wrong; needs 'morer better' thinking about.... :roll:

A brake that is sized/specified so that it cannot flip you over the handlebars can usually be applied 'full gas' and will produce better emergency stops. If it is more consistent too then it is even better again.

cheers


The key is - give value judgements with numbers and added up the scores - disc brakes win hands down.

No lengthy intellectual diatribe will win over practical hands on riding experience - for me (just me maybe) you can't beat disc brakes.
I won't be buying any new bikes without them.
by pedals2slowly
19 Aug 2020, 8:49pm
Forum: Bikes & Bits – Technical section
Topic: Yet another reason to avoid carbon frames
Replies: 278
Views: 10500

Re: Yet another reason to avoid carbon frames

slowster wrote:What certification and qualified assurances are you referring to, and from whom?


Does the manufacturer have an UCAS accredited IS0 9001 certificate - normally paraded by holders on their website.
However cyclists (customers) probably don't know about ISO9001 so cycle manufacturers either don't publish the fact or haven't got it.

Ideally someone like Reynolds would have their own qualification process and only sell bicycle frame material to accredited frame builders :lol:
by pedals2slowly
19 Aug 2020, 8:22pm
Forum: Does anyone know … ?
Topic: Bestest ever bicycle brakes... ?
Replies: 129
Views: 4347

Re: Bestest ever bicycle brakes... ?

Pneumant wrote:In answer to the thread title (..bestest?!) and for a road bike I nominate the esteemed late 80's Shimano 1050 Single Pivots. An excellent design. Light in weight, smooth & powerful action (ball bearing pivot) with lots of feel, possible to have a firm feeling brake with the blocks not set close to the rim and also possible to easily adjust so the brake arms are the same distance from the rim both sides, the brake will hold this position irrespective of block wear (so no pad adjustment required to compensate for wear -unlike a DPB).
105sp.JPG I prefer these brakes overall to DPB's.


But crap in the pouring rain and (unbelievably) designed to wear away one of the most important structural parts of your bicycle - the rim! :lol:
by pedals2slowly
19 Aug 2020, 8:21pm
Forum: Does anyone know … ?
Topic: Bestest ever bicycle brakes... ?
Replies: 129
Views: 4347

Re: Bestest ever bicycle brakes... ?

Different fore and aft brakes is irrelevant unless you are trying to save grams by having a smaller rear brake.
Whatever brakes you have you apply different forces with each hand to suit the braking you require.

For weak people with small hands hydraulic brakes are best.

I'm with reohn2 - BB7's cable operated now as standard on Mountain bike, gravel bike, touring bike, winter bike and touring tandem.
I'd fit them to the rest but hydraulic discs are OK, calipers suit the classics and dad's 1950's Elswick would probably crumble under the braking forces.

If you did a table of pro's and con's, gave value judgements with numbers and added up the scores, disc brakes would beat all other brakes hands down.

Disc brakes are the best.................but some are not :?
by pedals2slowly
19 Aug 2020, 3:33pm
Forum: Using the Forum - request help : report difficulties
Topic: Is there any way to prevent threads being hijacked
Replies: 38
Views: 2380

Re: Is there any way to prevent threads being hijacked

Oldjohnw wrote:Sometimes I just love the way threads meander along, way off topic. True craic.


But, but, but you've stuck to the original subject, I trust you are well?
by pedals2slowly
18 Aug 2020, 3:47pm
Forum: Using the Forum - request help : report difficulties
Topic: Is there any way to prevent threads being hijacked
Replies: 38
Views: 2380

Re: Is there any way to prevent threads being hijacked

Mick F wrote:Ask a direct question, get an answer or two, and that's that.


I almost accept that, the problem is when posters divert from the topic immediately and there are no relevant comments. Once that is done there seems to be no way back to the original post which must be so disheartening to the OP.

Imagine you are with a group of people and you say 'I need a new waterproof, what shall I get?' and the first person to reply (who you've never met before) says ' You just need to go cycling when it's dry'. You'd think what a p*****k that person was, yet here on the forum that sort of comment to somebody you don't know seems common place.

Interesting piece on TV am today where an 'expert' said that everything starts unregulated but as it becomes more sophisticated regulations and rules come into place. How long before we can only comment with our real, verified names and social media is 'properly controlled' . IMHO that would improve life considerably, whether it's here or facebook. (He said anonymously) :lol:
by pedals2slowly
18 Aug 2020, 3:30pm
Forum: Using the Forum - request help : report difficulties
Topic: Is there any way to prevent threads being hijacked
Replies: 38
Views: 2380

Re: Is there any way to prevent threads being hijacked

Despite obvious attempts and a p**s take or two we seem well on track actually.

Thirdcrank makes some very sensible points.
by pedals2slowly
18 Aug 2020, 2:38pm
Forum: Using the Forum - request help : report difficulties
Topic: Is there any way to prevent threads being hijacked
Replies: 38
Views: 2380

Re: Is there any way to prevent threads being hijacked

PH wrote:I couldn't care less about thread drift, but this forum would be a far better place if people were a bit less judgemental.


Surely that is being judgemental? I think the moderators, by definition have to be judgemental, or are we to accept whatever people post regardless of its content?

Anyway, as somebody posted above, if you want a chat, maybe sticking to the tea shop would be less irritating to those who actually want serious answers to queries?