Search found 984 matches

by AndyK
9 Apr 2021, 2:59pm
Forum: Does anyone know … ?
Topic: is 7 speed cassette obsolete?
Replies: 16
Views: 643

Re: is 7 speed cassette obsolete?

scottg wrote: 9 Apr 2021, 1:30pm With a 7s Shimano wheel, you can use a 9s or 10s cassette,
leave off the the first cog.
Some of the cassettes come with two serrated cogs,
for use next to the lock ring. Look for cassettes with a 12t
in second position.
Er... so you end up with an 8- or 9-sprocket cassette with spacing that's incompatible with your existing 7-speed shifters and 7-speed chain? This does not sound like a particularly useful thing to do. Much better to buy a 7-speed cassette - which, as colin54 points out, are still available, Brexit/Covid/Suez problems allowing) and use spacers.

To the OP: the Flux comes with the 1.85mm spacer to convert its freehub from 11-speed to 8/9/10-speed compatible. To use the 7-speed cassette you'll need (I think) another 4.5mm of cassette spacers. You may find that your rear derailleur needs adjusting though. If you need a new 7-speed cassette, perfectly decent models are also still produced by SRAM and Sunrace, and overpriced premium quality ones by IRD. Good luck finding one in stock anywhere at the moment though.

7-speed is obsolescent in the sense that it's rarely spec'd on new bikes, and those new bikes that it does appear on are invariably cheap'n-cheerful* sub-£200 "mountain bikes". As the equipment manufacturers make most of their money selling to the bike manufacturers they are going to focus on what the bike companies want, so there will be less choice available in older standards like 7-speed. Similarly if your local bike shop mainly sells and services high-end bikes, it's not going to bother keeping many 7-speed cassettes in stock - unlike, say, a community bike workshop, which will always try to have a few on hand. That's not the same as obsolete, though.

* I say "cheerful" - it's all fun and games until the cheapo v-brake pulls apart at a crucial moment...
by AndyK
8 Apr 2021, 1:24pm
Forum: Does anyone know … ?
Topic: Anti-seize grease
Replies: 39
Views: 1354

Re: Anti-seize grease

Cyclon Assembly Paste (ceramic-based) works well for me. Available from eBay sellers and the like, but also distributed in the UK by Cycle Division so any LBS with a Cycle Division account should be able to get hold of it. Not cheap, but a 150ml tube will last for ages and ages. Looks like white grease but behaves very differently, so be careful not to get the tubes mixed up (not that I've ever done such a thing <cough>).
by AndyK
7 Apr 2021, 10:10am
Forum: Touring & Expedition
Topic: Pilgrimage routes
Replies: 10
Views: 917

Re: Pilgrimage routes

Richard Fairhurst wrote: 4 Apr 2021, 5:54pm
gaz wrote: 4 Apr 2021, 4:24pm
Launching during Bike Week 2021 is the Cathedrals Cycle Route, taking you nearly 2,000 miles across England’s landscape between 42 cathedrals
https://www.cyclinguk.org/cathedrals-cy ... -challenge
Interesting project.

It looks like a serviceable cycle route between cathedrals. I'm not convinced there's much of a "pilgrimage" about it - they're by and large well-trodden paths (NCN routes or similar), and there doesn't seem to have been much of an attempt to pass by many holy places en route. The Leicester–Peterborough leg misses Launde Abbey by a few miles, for example, and I'm surprised Salisbury–Exeter doesn't go via Sherborne Abbey. Some of the route choices are a bit odd - the Worcester–Coventry route detours via the southern Birmingham suburbs, and Lichfield–Chester spends a lot of time on bumpy towpaths.

But I'm sure it'll be enjoyable to ride. I think if I were planning a cycling pilgrimage, I'd probably look for something further off the beaten track, perhaps riding through the Welsh borders past some of the tiny village churches and old drovers' roads.
The Winchester-Salisbury route is... interesting. The organisers claim to have designed the routes with the help of "local cyclists". I can safely say no local cyclist was involved in that section - unless it was someone who lives in North Baddesley and who wanted to drag everyone through miles of A-road and suburban purgatory just so they'd go past his house.
by AndyK
31 Mar 2021, 1:50pm
Forum: Bikes & Bits – Technical section
Topic: Have you ever been defeated by a tyre?
Replies: 85
Views: 3436

Re: Have you ever been defeated by a tyre?

Never been defeated yet, though I have occasionally had to push on the bead so hard that my thumbs bled around the cuticles. (Not nice.) I consider it a moral defeat if I have to resort to using a lever, which does sometimes happen.

One thing often overlooked is that the bead on one side of the tyre can be slightly tighter than the other. Not by much - both will be within tolerance in that they do their job of keeping the tyre on the rim, but they may not be exactly the same and that can make a big difference. If you're removing the tyre completely then taking the looser side off first makes the tighter side easier to remove - and vice versa when refitting.
If you always take the same side off to fix a puncture, that side's bead will eventually become slightly looser anyway.

This revelation came to me in a flash of inspiration years ago while sitting on a Hampshire bridleway fixing a puncture as darkness descended, wondering why the tyre I'd removed and replaced easily the week before was suddenly near-impossible to get back onto the rim.
by AndyK
25 Mar 2021, 12:50pm
Forum: Bikes & Bits – Technical section
Topic: Parts Shortage
Replies: 44
Views: 1807

Re: Parts Shortage

PT1029 wrote:The 2 suppliers I use for work have no 8 speeds cassettes between them. I suspect as well as production disruption, the bike manufacturers are buying up the stock. I think I have 1 8s cassette left, I think I'll have to auction it off!
In one case the manufacturer (Sun Race) refused/was unable to the give the supplier a delivery date.

Yes, I noticed the 8-speed cassette shortage last week when I offered to get one in for a customer. 4 different distributors, no cassettes. (Plus one distributor whose website seems to be permanently down.) And not just 8-speed, either.
by AndyK
24 Mar 2021, 10:47am
Forum: Touring & Expedition
Topic: Crossing the South Downs
Replies: 11
Views: 1058

Re: Crossing the South Downs

tatanab wrote:
st599_uk wrote:Does anyone know of a nice route through the South Downs? Cycle.travel seems to be suggesting a path alongside the A3?
Taking that part in isolation - look a little to the east and you will see a lanes climb through Buriton, or slightly further east the B road climb from South Harting.

From South Harting specifically, I'd recommend going to east to Turkey Island first (just near East Harting) then taking the minor road climb up to Harting Down. Much quieter. The B2141 is, unfortunately, quite busy and has sharp bends so it can be intimidating. It's OK coming down but a right pain going up. (Either way, make sure you're in a low gear...)
by AndyK
24 Mar 2021, 9:42am
Forum: Touring & Expedition
Topic: Crossing the South Downs
Replies: 11
Views: 1058

Re: Crossing the South Downs

matt_twam_asi wrote:
mjr wrote:
matt_twam_asi wrote:The Centurion Way is a great way to get into Chichester from top of the downs. The ride from Cranleigh -> Loxwood -> Kirdford -> Lurgashall -> Lodsworth -> Selham -> Bex Lane is almost entirely on quiet, scenic lanes. Then pick up the Centurion Way at West Dean.

But between Bex Lane and Centurion Way is A286 Cocking Hill or is there an avoiding route?


Not really... There's a road from Heyshott to Cocking, but it's not great. AFAIK there's no paved alternative to going up Cocking Hill. The A286 isn't bad for an A road traffic-wise.
[edit] ok, there are alternatives - e.g. the B2141, but I can't speak from experience about coming from the north-west.

There are bridleways that go straight up the north face of the Downs and lead to West Dean but I've never tried any of them.

The road from Heyshott to Cocking is OK, it just forgets that it's a road for a few hundred yards in the middle but it soon remembers again. :-)

The A286 going south out of Cocking is initially an unpleasant climb with traffic squeezing past you frequently, but that only lasts half a mile. After the summit near Hill Barn, where the South Downs Way crosses, it's a long steady downhill to Singleton, most of it with good visibility so you don't get too many vehicles doing suicidal overtaking dashes past you.

There is a byway just to the east of the A286 and running parallel to it, from Cocking up to Hill Barn: this is steep and deeply-rutted with patches of loose stones and smooth chalk, so it's probably get-off-and-push territory unless you're on a mountain bike and good at handling it. There's another byway running parallel on the west side of the A286, but last time I tried that a few years back, a landowner at the top had allowed their hedges to overgrow until they blocked it completely. However that one has recently been earmarked to be part of the planned Centurion Way Extension, so the national park authority may be taking more of an interest in its upkeep.

Once you're at the summit where the A286 crosses the South Downs Way, one option is to go about 3/4 mile west along the SDW then cut SW on bridleways through Westdean Woods to reach the tarmac lane by Staple Ash Farm. I've done those bridleways on a touring bike with 32mm tyres when the ground was slightly damp and they were manageable. The tarmac lane then leads SE down into West Dean - and in fact it takes you under the northernmost bit of the Centurion Way just before you reach the village. There's a flight of steps from the lane up to the Centurion Way, with a (steep) bike wheel channel alongside it so you can push your bike up.
by AndyK
21 Mar 2021, 10:53am
Forum: Does anyone know … ?
Topic: Cotswolds.
Replies: 50
Views: 1725

Re: Cotswolds.

Richard Fairhurst wrote:Good choice - Winchcombe's a lovely town. And the climb up the Cotswold edge is... character-building?

Here's a new cycle route sign being installed in the centre of Winchcombe the other week:

IMG_2896.jpg

You can follow the signs to Tewkesbury in one direction, or in the other direction to Northleach, Burford and onwards.

Wow. I digress, but... someone's installing a new National Byway sign? Down round our way the signage hasn't been maintained for years. Is Glos CC paying for that one?
by AndyK
15 Mar 2021, 4:29pm
Forum: Bikes & Bits – Technical section
Topic: White mudguards
Replies: 11
Views: 562

Re: White mudguards

Soma Raindogs, available from Southern Distributors in the UK.
https://southerndistributors.co.uk/prod ... c-fenders/
Designed for 700C but I'm guessing they'll stretch to 27". You might want to check whether they're in stock before ordering though - in the past I've found SD's website was not good at telling you when lines were out of stock.
image-220.jpg
by AndyK
13 Mar 2021, 7:57pm
Forum: Does anyone know … ?
Topic: Cotswolds.
Replies: 50
Views: 1725

Re: Cotswolds.

Mick F wrote:
AndyK wrote:To be fair, more than 90% of that route isn't in the Cotswolds at all!
Why did they call the Audax the "Cotswolds Challenge"?

It was a CTC organised ride in 2014 (or was it CUK by then?)

I imagine the challenge was to reach the Cotswolds. :)
by AndyK
13 Mar 2021, 1:54pm
Forum: Does anyone know … ?
Topic: Cotswolds.
Replies: 50
Views: 1725

Re: Cotswolds.

Mick F wrote:I did the Cotswolds Challenge on an organised ride.
I enjoyed the countryside. Not very hilly, but ok.

Never done an Audax before, and probably never do another as many of the riders treated it as a race so it spoilt it for me perhaps.
Started and ended in Meriden. 107.66miles .............. whatever that is in Kms. :wink:
It was only 6,000ft of ascent where I'm use to to 100ft+ per mile, so my average speed was the highest of any of my century rides.

Screen Shot 2021-03-13 at 13.16.12.png

To be fair, more than 90% of that route isn't in the Cotswolds at all! You only entered the Cotswolds as you climbed the hill northeast of Broadway (Dover's Hill, by the look of it) then left it again as soon as you crossed the A429 near Moreton-in-Marsh. In those 9 miles you would have done about 950ft of ascent, half of it packed into that initial 1.5 mile climb.
by AndyK
13 Mar 2021, 1:04pm
Forum: Does anyone know … ?
Topic: Cotswolds.
Replies: 50
Views: 1725

Re: Cotswolds.

Oldjohnw wrote:
Mike_Ayling wrote:
AndyK wrote:Oh, nothing really, I'm just being snarky. It's just the ultimate Cotswold tourist trap - usually (in non-Covid times) jam-packed with cars, motorbikes, tourist coach parties shopping in Edinburgh Woollen Mill. There are a couple of sneaky routes in and out though, it is very pretty, and it's got a wide selction of cafes and pubs. Just a bit of a let-down when you've spent the rest of the day on quiet lanes through peaceful villages.


I cycled through there in about 1970 and I don't recall it being a tourist trap then.

Mike


I have visited most years recently: always unbelievably busy. A lot can happen in 50 years!

Indeed. Though in my book anywhere with a model village, maze, bird zoo, motor museum, multiple souvenir shops, a handmade fudge shop and a steady flow of coach parties counts as a tourist trap, and many of those elements have been present in Bourton since the 1950s.

It's not all tourist attractions, though - there's a big industrial estate on the north side of town. :-)

Seriously, it's very scenic if you can see past all that, but the heavy traffic at peak times can be annoying.
by AndyK
12 Mar 2021, 9:42am
Forum: Does anyone know … ?
Topic: Cotswolds.
Replies: 50
Views: 1725

Re: Cotswolds.

Mike_Ayling wrote:What's wrong with Bourton on the Water?

Oh, nothing really, I'm just being snarky. It's just the ultimate Cotswold tourist trap - usually (in non-Covid times) jam-packed with cars, motorbikes, tourist coach parties shopping in Edinburgh Woollen Mill. There are a couple of sneaky routes in and out though, it is very pretty, and it's got a wide selction of cafes and pubs. Just a bit of a let-down when you've spent the rest of the day on quiet lanes through peaceful villages.
by AndyK
11 Mar 2021, 11:41pm
Forum: Does anyone know … ?
Topic: Cotswolds.
Replies: 50
Views: 1725

Re: Cotswolds.

For pretty villages, lots of quiet country lanes and fairly easy-going cycling, the area east of Cirencester is fantastic, up as far as Burford and over to the Oxfordshire borders. Filkins, Eastleach, Bibury, the Coln Valley, Chedworth, the Windrush valley - it's all magical.
North around Stow and up towards Moreton and Broadway is also pretty, though with more and bigger hills. (And a flat bit east of Moreton just for variety.)
For dramatic valleys and spectacular views, the western edge: Dursley/Nailsworth/Stroud. Great for hiking; some challenging hills for cycling and a bit harder to avoid the traffic if you're on-road. It has some bike paths on old railway lines.
The Oxfordshire Cotswolds are nice too but again harder to avoid the traffic.
I also like the southwest around Malmesbury where it spills over into the rolling hills of Wiltshire.
Oh, everywhere really. It's all good. Except for Bourton-on-the-Water.
by AndyK
4 Mar 2021, 11:01am
Forum: Bikes & Bits – Technical section
Topic: Child seat voiding frame warranty
Replies: 41
Views: 1132

Re: Bike warranty with child seats

From the standard Canyon MTB manual, as (presumably) issued with new bikes:

screenshot-www.canyon.com-2021.03.04-10_07_10.png
screenshot-www.canyon.com-2021.03.04-10_07_10.png (22.01 KiB) Viewed 217 times

So that's a 'no' on the trailers as well.

@PT1029: I guess the key point there is that you were working in an authorised dealer, so were (one hopes) providing expert advice on whether a particular bike was suitable for a child seat or not. Depending on the manufacturer's relationship with its dealer network, that might or might not provide some kind of warranty protection.