Search found 265 matches

by djb
24 Mar 2021, 1:38pm
Forum: Touring & Expedition
Topic: Drive Belt vs Chain, Rohloff Hub vs Derailler, and other questions.
Replies: 124
Views: 3636

Re: Drive Belt vs Chain, Rohloff Hub vs Derailler, and other questions.

BikeBuddha wrote:I am brand new to touring and am thinking of going around the world by bike


What is your actual real budget for a bike, unless you actually really mean cost is not a factor?
Take into account also the costs of good quality gear for such a long trip, which will add up also.

I ask just to direct the discussion along a more realistic direction cost/budget wise--I mean it's fun to dream and all, but at some point being realistic about budget is good too.
by djb
22 Mar 2021, 1:24pm
Forum: Touring & Expedition
Topic: What Are The Concerns With The New Disc Trucker?
Replies: 14
Views: 1130

Re: What Are The Concerns With The New Disc Trucker?

The price increases, as you say, were indeed quite a shock about 5 or 6 years ago.
I kicked myself that I didn't buy a troll new before the prices increased, but then managed later to find a used one.
by djb
18 Mar 2021, 2:21am
Forum: Touring & Expedition
Topic: Long lost Thermarest mattress
Replies: 13
Views: 724

Re: Long lost Thermarest mattress

djb wrote:I’d give it time. We were once given one that had been kept rolled up for ages and it seems to me that it very gradually expanded properly over weeks and months.
But only time will tell.13 years is a good long period. I think ours always stayed slow self inflating.
Seems to me even when still slow expanding, extra puffs still worked well getting it to the right pressure for sleeping.
by djb
18 Mar 2021, 2:19am
Forum: Touring & Expedition
Topic: Long lost Thermarest mattress
Replies: 13
Views: 724

Re: Long lost Thermarest mattress

I’d give it time. We were once given one that had been kept rolled up for ages and it seems to me that it very gradually expanded properly.
But only time will tell.13 years is a good long period.
Seems to me even when still slow expanding, extra puffs still worked well getting it to the right pressure for sleeping.
by djb
16 Mar 2021, 2:05pm
Forum: Touring & Expedition
Topic: Touring from Caen (May 12th 2021)
Replies: 20
Views: 1002

Re: Touring from Caen (May 12th 2021)

Jdsk wrote:Yes. And refreshing the message. And targeted approaches to different groups. Etc etc.

Jonathan


And we have all seen how in the U.S. with Trump, repeating and repeating messages contrary to scientific fact for partisan reasons, lead to a significant number of Americans believing illogical views on covid, mask wearing etc.
And then of course the illogical and dangerous views on their presidential election results.
by djb
15 Mar 2021, 6:28pm
Forum: Touring & Expedition
Topic: Real capacity of panniers
Replies: 40
Views: 1260

Re: Real capacity of panniers

willem jongman wrote:"Willem, it seems to me that the Canadian brand arkel has some models that are inbetweenish in size". Yes they do, and no they don't. If anything, their real size is smaller than the Ortlieb front rollers. Also, and unlike other Arkel panniers, these are not very rugged. But they are impressively light at under a pound if I remember correctly.


you are thinking of the Dry-Lites, yes they are lightweight ones, I have a pair (they use velcro to attach to rack)

I just looked, and sure enough, they have other tough models, Orca in 25l, 35l and 45l,
and the Dolphin model in 32l and 48l, so there are 32 and 35l options, kind of inbetween the usual 25 and 40l Ortlieb options.

like I said, as long as I can remember when I've looked at Arkel stuff in stores, I've always been impressed by the overall quality of them, the stitching, the mounting hardware etc of their various models. The Dry-Lites are very much a more delicate pannier, but neat in its own way.
by djb
15 Mar 2021, 2:35pm
Forum: Touring & Expedition
Topic: What Are The Concerns With The New Disc Trucker?
Replies: 14
Views: 1130

Re: What Are The Concerns With The New Disc Trucker?

andrew_s wrote:
mattsccm wrote:Things like through axles probably are not an issue as they tend not to fail

The problem with thru axles isn't them breaking, but them seizing in place.
e.g. https://www.mtbr.com/threads/cant-remov ... el.921302/
or https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4nprmKzBRlg (see the comments below)

Finding a seized axle mid-tour, with a flat tyre, wouldn't be amusing.


I see this possibility as similar to never greasing a pedal thread, been overtightened a bit, never removing it for years and then having a bear of a time getting it off. I realize that lots of people don't think of stuff like this, but it would simply be a matter of being aware of this and greasing it, like we do with seatposts and pedals, and would take care of the problem easily.
by djb
15 Mar 2021, 2:10pm
Forum: Touring & Expedition
Topic: Real capacity of panniers
Replies: 40
Views: 1260

Re: Real capacity of panniers

Vorpal wrote:I think that it also depends on how (well) you pack. Putting things in a pannier is rather like doing a puzzle. I usually spend some time before a tour trying different arrangements and packing order, both for space efficiency & access (i.e. spare gloves,extra clothing layer, rain gear, etc.) I can get approximately 50% more in a pannier, freezer, cupboard, or boot than Mr. V can, mostly because I take the time to work it out. I also seem to have a little better spatial perception (i.e. what / how much fits into a particular space), but I don't know how much of that is just practice.


so true, so true.
In our case Mrs djb is the one who has inherently less spatial perception. I also always laugh/shake my head at how the inverse happens in our tent, how a reverse "Tardis" or "Harry Potter magical Hermione camping handbag" thing happens, with a seemingly inexplicable explosion of items that take up the entire tent, which then leads back to a harried "argh, why won't this all fit in my panniers" sort of thing slash repeat.
But she is a million times smarter than me in so many ways, we all have our strong points and weak points, what makes us human.
by djb
15 Mar 2021, 1:04pm
Forum: Touring & Expedition
Topic: Real capacity of panniers
Replies: 40
Views: 1260

Re: Real capacity of panniers

Willem, it seems to me that the Canadian brand arkel has some models that are inbetweenish in size. Don't have details in front of me but check them out. I've never owned arkels but friends do, and I've always been impressed by arkels build quality when looking at them in hand in stores. They use a very sturdy looking bungee , hook system and an interesting and also sturdy cam system on the top hooks to stop the hopping off rail thing.
by djb
12 Mar 2021, 3:41pm
Forum: Touring & Expedition
Topic: Made to fit or Off the rack tourer for long distance touring
Replies: 37
Views: 1328

Re: Made to fit or Off the rack tourer for long distance touring

I was surprised that you didnt go CSS, and while probably very rare now to find, yours will last and last from what the little I've read. I get the dt super tough thing, out of the way of any throwing of bike on top of stuff on top of a truck or whatever. Unlike you, although I rode them for decades, I'm not inclined to go back to them, but not keen on bar end shifters either, why I went the Gevenalle route (although am realistic that they are exposed to bashing a certain amount, but haven't been in compromising situations that bad so far, touch wood)

and yes, as you say, triples are easily sourced.
by djb
12 Mar 2021, 1:55pm
Forum: Touring & Expedition
Topic: Made to fit or Off the rack tourer for long distance touring
Replies: 37
Views: 1328

Re: Made to fit or Off the rack tourer for long distance touring

Pq, such good advice to add to others here. We'll see if the person ever returns.

I would add that really other than rim brakes, and your choice of shifters, it's very possible today to set up a bike in the same vein as yours. Years past when I followed Hugh and Pauline Symonds trips on crazyguy (think i have names right) i found their bikes to be very neat and i liked the general approach. Robert Roughstuffs comes to mind, maybe I'm not remembering correctly, with similar characteristics as yours.
Similar frame, take wide tires, drops. Now theirs use rohlofs, mechanical discs, but your and their bikes very much influenced me in my choice of using a surly troll as a base.

I figure the real issue nowadays is the reduced existence of mtb triples, which I still feel is the most appropriate for this type of touring.
by djb
8 Mar 2021, 3:31pm
Forum: Touring & Expedition
Topic: What Are The Concerns With The New Disc Trucker?
Replies: 14
Views: 1130

Re: What Are The Concerns With The New Disc Trucker?

my take on the changes are that they are clearly aiming the marketing / look of the bike more at the "bikepacking' crowd. My take on this is simply because they are responding to the market, and want the bike to be attractive to the new folks looking into bike touring, but lets be honest here, any young person is going to be looking for images and whatnot of "bikepacking", so the changes to the LHT will still be attractive to a 20 something looking to get into things, as the majority of the imagery and blah blah about travelling by bike is more "bikepacking".

(I say this rather in a general sense, of how I observe the market now and what attracts 20 somethings--but I want to stress, I have nothing against bikepacking, Im just trying to be realistic about the optics going on here)

-to me, the shorter chainstays aren't an issue, I ride a Troll and I love how it handles, unloaded or loaded, and I've got mine in dropbar mode too (could be an issue with really big shoe people)
-being able to take wider tires is a plus (why I got the Troll actually, along with the shorter chainstays for a quicker handling bike)
-I get the sales pitch/visuals of using the higher "riser bars", they look neat.
-the gearing is still good, but hey, component choice is really about the sti compatibility thing (which leads back to the marketing of sti's as so many "gravel" bikes out there have this, lets face it, bar end shifters are "old fogeyish")
-I use a rear Tubus rack, the two level one, Logo, on my Troll and it works fine with the shape of my frame, I don't know if the slope of the new disc trucker will limit the use of rear racks to those like mine that come with longer attaching rods. Mine works fine.
-re spokes, the surly site specs wheels as 36h wheels, and the tough alex adventurer 2 rims, so should be fine.
- re 26in wheels, despite what is said, on smaller frames 26in are still a real advantage, no toe strike and all that. Plus lower gearing for touring, always a plus. I admit I am biased. I see no disadvantage to them at all, other than less newer tires available to us now unfortunately.
by djb
7 Mar 2021, 11:04pm
Forum: Touring & Expedition
Topic: Made to fit or Off the rack tourer for long distance touring
Replies: 37
Views: 1328

Re: Made to fit or Off the rack tourer for long distance touring

simonhill wrote:A few comments.

As alluded to somewhere above, if you buy something like a Surly in the US you could save about 30% or more. This obviously poses time and logistical problems and also means you could be setting off on an unproved bike.

Again as mentioned, it would be useful to have an idea of expected road conditions, your load, previous experience, etc - who knows, you could be planning a lightweight record breaking speed attempt. Let's hope the OP is still reading.

I have no real position on which frame, apart from steel and tough. What I would say is that you need to choose your components and gear possibly more carefully. Firstly, do you know what is available on the spares front on your route. My guess is that apart from parts of Central America, most of the countries en route will have decent quality equipment available in the larger towns, but this isn't my cycle touring region and I don't know. Browsing crazyguy could be useful. Also googling bike shops in the towns and cities en route will give an idea of stock they carry,

In the UK, Spa Cycles seem to have good coverage for touring components and will build to your spec. I wouldn't buy an off the peg complete bike as there always seems to be compromises on some of the components. Beware of anything too exotic or delicate when choosing components. Solid and dull isn't a bad mantra for touring. Don't shirk on your luggage - it is dead weight and takes a tremendous hammering over time.

I have an LHT which has served me well for over 35,000 Kms long haul touring, plus another 25+ general riding. I had it built with Deore 9 speed in 2012 and this has served me very well. Good wheels are essential - I used 36 spoke Sputniks, now superseded by Ryde Andra.

Re theft, etc. This has never worried me but I am careful, without being paranoid. I mainly tour in Asia and often leave my bike unattended (with small cable lock) while shopping, etc. I have travelled extensively in C and S America and always thought theft more of a problem there. A touring bike soon looks tatty, although drops will set it apart from most local steeds and possibly highlight it's value. Ironically, you may find your biggest risk is in the US.

Your route is a bit of a cycling super highway, particularly for American cyclists. I'm sure that you will quickly meet people who have cycled some or part of the route who can give you lots of advice and opinions. I wouldn't over plan or worry too much.

One final thing. You say next year. I would keep a close eye on the countries you will be passing through re Covid. Even once borders are open foreign cyclists may not find a warm welcome in out of the way places. Paranoia tends to hang around.


first of all Simon, a lot of very good points.

but as you say, the person in question has one post only, and we've been blathering on about stuff on our own. I hope he or she comes back into the conversation if they are serious about this rather large scale trip.

re bike parts, I'd add that from the larger, nicer bike shops in larger cities that I saw in 2017, 2018 in Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras and Costa Rica (didnt go into any bike shops in Nicaragua) they always had low to mid to even high end mountain bikes, so I'm sure the world standard available stuff like Alivio, Deore rear derailleurs and stuff is fairly common.

**though as you alluded to with one aspect of Covid, another most likely is going to be the long term economic impact in so many countries, which will also translate to very few parts available--heck, even here in Canada stuff is scarce now, and our supply chain issues will get resolved a hell of alot quicker than predominantly poorer latin American countries (which have had a real kicking economically , much worse than us, with the covid situation).
by djb
7 Mar 2021, 6:11pm
Forum: Touring & Expedition
Topic: Real capacity of panniers
Replies: 40
Views: 1260

Re: Real capacity of panniers

colin54 wrote:
djb wrote:
Hey there Cleopatra,


:lol: Classic post.


Glad you weren't offended. Was simply the first imagery that popped in my head.

I have also used an ortlieb to wash my wifes and my bike clothes once.
by djb
7 Mar 2021, 2:47pm
Forum: Touring & Expedition
Topic: Real capacity of panniers
Replies: 40
Views: 1260

Re: Real capacity of panniers

colin54 wrote:Just because I could...I filled my current model Super C up with 4 pint (2.3l) milk containers, the main compartment took 11 fillings, so 11x2.3=25.3l ;the pocket took just over another bottle so say another 2.3l. So 27.6 litres in total x 2 panniers = 55.2 pretty close to the stated 56 litres, bearing in mind the rough and ready measuring.
I measured a small pair of Ortliebs (so presumably they will use the same measuring system as on the larger ones ).They came in at 5.5 bottles a side so 2.3l x5.5 =12.65litres a side pretty close to their figure of 25 litres a pair total.
Both sets of bags measured to the top of the main part of the bag, level with the top of the metal strip on the inside of the Carradice bag and with the top of the plastic strip on the outside of the Ortlieb.
As mentioned above there's a bit of spare capacity beyond the stated size of the Ortlieb I should think in the folding bit.
The main compartment of a pair of Ortlieb Back Roller Classic is stated as 40 litres, as measured above on the Carradice it's 50.6litres and another 4.6 litres total approx for the pockets per pair.
$matches[2]


Hey there Cleopatra, at first my brain was thinking, "he filled his pannier with milk because he could, maybe he's a dairy farmer??"

I did the same once on a commute with an ortlieb, got a flat and my spare tube had been in my seatbag for so long, it had gotten abraded with a big hole. Did have patch kit but to find hole in orig tube I found a tap behind a building and partially filled pannier you be sure I'd see the hole or holes in tube.
Worked a treat.
Another rare use of waterproof panniers.

And yes, I too regularly overfill my ortliebs with groceries,but we don't get as much rain as you poor Poms ;-)