Search found 357 matches

by Kevin K
26 Feb 2011, 1:31pm
Forum: Does anyone know … ?
Topic: Child's bike for touring?
Replies: 9
Views: 918

Re: Child's bike for touring?

Damon,
I've pulled an Islabikes Beinn 20 with a Follow-me Tandem Coupling. It tended to sway from side to side when my stoker (120cm tall) was active and I believe a bigger rider would be rather unstable, even if you could find a suitable bike.
Good luck anyway.
Kevin
by Kevin K
23 Jan 2011, 6:48pm
Forum: Bikes & Bits – Technical section
Topic: Bar end shifters - friction vs indexed?
Replies: 16
Views: 6724

Re: Bar end shifters - friction vs indexed?

I've used STI, Shimano bar ends and now use Dia Compe bar ends (labelled Silver shifters). I like the very direct, but extremely light feel of the Dia Compe's and don't miss the indexing at all. After a period of adjustment shifting becomes instinctive and less cluncky/clicky than Shimano (I know one can change Shimano to friction, but the feel simply isn't the same).
by Kevin K
20 Jan 2011, 10:37am
Forum: Touring & Expedition
Topic: Kids Touring Bike
Replies: 8
Views: 950

Re: Kids Touring Bike

Gavin Hill wrote:Have looked at the Isalbikes range and whilst they look great they're too expensive at £400-500 when he's growing like a weed and doesn't look after his bikes
I've bought and sold several Islabikes as the kids have grown. I don't think I've lost money compared to buying a cheaper cycle, and none of them have been in perfect condition (i.e. used and to some extent abused as would be normal with a kids bike).
by Kevin K
18 Jan 2011, 11:24am
Forum: Does anyone know … ?
Topic: Memory Map
Replies: 24
Views: 3438

Re: Memory Map

John in Leeds wrote:Just a quick warning to those who would like to purchase the 1.50000 Landranger maps from Anquet, they are not up to date. The new road to Mallaig is shown as proposed only. I think the road has been in for 10 years but not sure.
I found this too and contacted Anquet on Friday to ask about it. I received a response yesterday. Apparently, their download server had the wrong version which they've now updated. A bit of pain to re-download at 3GB , but full marks for a quick response.

I got a great deal upgrading my GB 1:50K mapping - £61, but a £122 credit against my account (i.e. an additional £61 to spend on other mapping).
by Kevin K
30 Nov 2010, 1:28pm
Forum: Does anyone know … ?
Topic: Bike for 3 to 4 year old.
Replies: 18
Views: 2765

Re: Bike for 3 to 4 year old.

eileithyia wrote:I've NEVER found Isalbikes helpful and that goes back to when they made their trailers, they then re-invented themselves as Ilsabikes. Their rep at York Rally (x2) and Mildenhall (x1) was most unhelpful and rude.

That's surprising and not something I've ever experienced. I can't speak for her staff, but Isla herself has always been helpful and polite in my dealings with company.
by Kevin K
20 Sep 2010, 10:07pm
Forum: The Tea Shop
Topic: Hawking,Dawkins V The faithful
Replies: 394
Views: 12602

Re: Hawking,Dawkins V The faithful

hubgearfreak wrote:
Kevin K wrote:those of us who wish a faith education expect to travel.

With the exception of rural CofE primaries


you see, i've got a problem with both these bits. second item first, i don't see COE as more truthful than any other faith, yet the implication is that this is OK?

I was stating a fact that "with the exception of rural CofE primaries, most faith schools are in urban or suburban areas where a real choice exists." If you want to draw any implication from the statment it is that there is a problem with rural faith-based schools. I don't know how you draw the conclusion that I see a CofE school as okay for non-faith parents.

hubgearfreak wrote:the other problem is that attending a specialist school to be taught to believe in something that can't be proven to exist therefore necessitating further travel that consumes finite resources, pollutes the environment and causes congestion. (all of which can be proven).

It seems to me that faith schools aren't really okay with you becasue you don't believe (if that isn't the sub-text why include the bit about "something that can't be proven to exist"?)

hubgearfreak wrote:what's wrong with the andy's option, of all scholls being non-faith, and you go off with your children at the weekend to church/ star trek convention/ CTC ride/ football or whatever one's interest is?

You are clearly dissmissive of my explanation as to why faith schools are important to those of us who choose them. Dissmissive in a way that I am not of secular education.
by Kevin K
20 Sep 2010, 9:03pm
Forum: The Tea Shop
Topic: Hawking,Dawkins V The faithful
Replies: 394
Views: 12602

Re: Hawking,Dawkins V The faithful

hubgearfreak wrote:so you're suggesting that faith schools should only exist where they're within a few hundred yards of a non faith school? and where there's not the numbers to warrant two schools, that there should only be non faith schools?

if so, we're agreed :D

Where numbers and geogrpahy allow, one ought to have the choice of a faith or non-faith school . There will be more non-faith schools than faith ones, so statistically non-faith schools ought to be closer to you. As to how close, will depend on exactly where you live. However, as faith schools will be a minority, so those of us who wish a faith education expect to travel.

With the exception of rural CofE primaries, most faith schools are in urban or suburban areas where a real choice exists.
by Kevin K
20 Sep 2010, 8:33pm
Forum: The Tea Shop
Topic: Hawking,Dawkins V The faithful
Replies: 394
Views: 12602

Re: Hawking,Dawkins V The faithful

hubgearfreak wrote:
Kevin K wrote:3) Attendance at a faith school should be voluntary and only chosen by parents who wish this for their children.

4) I don't see attendance at a faith school as harmful.


it's only voluntary for many, if they accept a long journey, or indeed can afford it. so, for those of us that don't/can't it's as good as compulsory

if your children had to attend a jewish/muslim/jedi knight school would you feel the same?

You seem to be ignoring the other element of my post which clearly states rural primary schools should be non-denominational. My last point should have been suffixed by "for those who choose this option", although I though it was obvious from the context.
by Kevin K
20 Sep 2010, 8:10pm
Forum: The Tea Shop
Topic: Hawking,Dawkins V The faithful
Replies: 394
Views: 12602

Re: Hawking,Dawkins V The faithful

thirdcrank wrote:Kevin K

One way or another, you have missed or avoided the point I am making about general to specific. Take, for example, kwackers point about freedom to leave. Apostasy is still viewed pretty dimly in some parts of the world and although I like to think I have my feet firmly planted, I've heard some pretty stark accounts relayed by my wife who until quite recently trained young people in Bradford. Even here in Leeds, we hear of Jewish families holding funerals for members who have married outside the faith. You point to 2000 years received teaching, but surely you don't see that as 20 centuries of unchanging belief? Even if what we might call the core has remained unchanged, the methods by which it has been imposed in all branches of Christianity have been toned down a bit - thankfully, it's a while since we had anybody burnt at the stake, for example. On a less horrific level, discrimination against women seems to be one area where a lot of religions seem to drag their feet. There are enough different strands of Christianity to say that they are not all singing from the same hymnsheet (if you will forgive a weak joke.) I lived for a while near Avignon, which apart from half-a-bridge (useless nowadays even for dancing) there is a Papal palace from the days when they had one each.

Specifically in the context of state-sponsored education, I don't see how we can say some faiths are OK but some remain beyond the pale, if we are not to be accused of religious discrimination. As I said earlier, too late now and I fear we will increasingly suffer an unnecessarily divided society.

Why is this important? If you don't catch 'em young, you often have to wait till the grave looms and they begin to worry.

Yep, sorry thirdcrank, I've obviosuly missed the point entirely. I'm not really sure what you are asking or epxect me to say....
by Kevin K
20 Sep 2010, 8:07pm
Forum: The Tea Shop
Topic: Hawking,Dawkins V The faithful
Replies: 394
Views: 12602

Re: Hawking,Dawkins V The faithful

AndyB wrote:So I think the disadvantages are:
1. Children who do not attend the local school because it is a faith school for a faith they do not share have to travel daily and have fewer opportunities for socialising with their school friends out of hours.
2. The local community is often focused around the school - we have certainly got much more involved with the village since our son started school, something that would have happened much more slowly, if at all, had we sent him elsewhere. I think everyone agrees that 'community' is worthwhile.
3. If the child is sent to the faith school, the parents will probably wish to explain how they disagree with what is being taught. There is potential for this to undermine faith in teachers. Perhaps this will generate a healthy scepticism of authority, but it can be confusing for children.
4. Children of parents with strong faiths are likely to be sent to schools of that faith. Such segregation is thought to be harmful, as integration leads to familiarity and reduces distrust of people with different backgrounds.

Against this, the only disadvantage for secular education that I can see from your arguments is that some aspects of the faith are likely to be underplayed (and in the context of a Christian in this country I suspect these are relatively subtle issues). Why can't this aspect of faith teaching be done by the parents, or within a church group or similar? An example of the sort of thing you're thinking of would be helpful.

To take each point in turn:

1) My kids travel further to school than many neighbouring children but we've not found a signficant reduction in socialising opportunities locally. Of course, this depends how far one travels. As a child I went several miles, but I don't recall socialising locally as being aproblem. As someone who chooses to send my children to a faith school, I accept that I will be a minority I do not expect the majority to put themselves out on my account. It seems to me In a village setting the local school ought to be non-denominational.

2) Community is important, and I agree parents are often drawn into the community when kids start school, hence the reason why rural schools should largely be non-denominational.

3) Attendance at a faith school should be voluntary and only chosen by parents who wish this for their children.

4) I don't see attendance at a faith school as harmful. My children have lots of other opportunities to socialise with those of other faiths and none.

For faith schools religion is not a single thing "done" in the RE lesson and that could be delivered outside the school, it is part of the fabric, life and culture of the school.

As I have said above, I do not seek to impose this choice on anyone, but see no reason why, as an element of parental choice and where it can be provided cost-effectively, it should not be an option for those that wish.
by Kevin K
20 Sep 2010, 7:12pm
Forum: The Tea Shop
Topic: Hawking,Dawkins V The faithful
Replies: 394
Views: 12602

Re: Hawking,Dawkins V The faithful

hubgearfreak wrote:
i don't know if you're being deliberately obtuse, or are simply daft. please address andy's points in my previous post :?

Hang on a minute hubgearfreak, you only posted a few minutes ago... give me time to respond!
by Kevin K
20 Sep 2010, 7:10pm
Forum: The Tea Shop
Topic: Hawking,Dawkins V The faithful
Replies: 394
Views: 12602

Re: Hawking,Dawkins V The faithful

thirdcrank wrote:I make no secret of having no religious faith but I'd try to respect (in the sense of treat with consideration, not in the sense of admire) anybody who has. When I saw this thread my heart sank, I put a brief note on it and then ignored it (probably hoping it would go away.) In the meantime it has drifted from a discussion of faith to one about organised religion.

I've ignored it for several weeks too, but felt obliged to submit some reasoned arguments in defence of faith. I seem to be in a minority, but perhaps I'll receive my reward in heaven :lol: :lol:

thirdcrank wrote:I'm not sure, but I get the impression from what you have said in the last couple of things I've read (to jonty about religious sectariansim and to kwackers about 2000 years received teaching) that you are taking faith in this context to mean your own faith. Bearing in mind some of what's been said about paedophile priests on the thread before I could understand that but from my own POV this is a much more general thing. The reason I query this is that in what you say, you go from what seems to be the general to the particular and then back to the general quite seamlessly. It may be that I have misunderstood what you have meant, which is why I query it.

I'm a practicing Roman Catholic and proud of it. I'm also English and proud of that too. I mention my nationality becasue Catholics living in Scotland are usually assumed to be of Irish descent and their experience is very different from mine.

I have tried hard to make a general reasoned argument for faith schools within a pluralistic education system and tolerant society. Given what I've said above you'll not be surprised that most of my faith school expereince as child and parent is Catholic in nature, so many of my examples come from that.

Where specific issues have been rasied (Jonty and sectarianism) or what I see as incorrect information (Kwakers and church teaching) I've attempted to deal with them directly.

I have absolutely no wish to impose my faith on anyone (that would be travesty), but I hope through reasoned argument that others will at least appreciate my point of view.
by Kevin K
20 Sep 2010, 6:52pm
Forum: The Tea Shop
Topic: Hawking,Dawkins V The faithful
Replies: 394
Views: 12602

Re: Hawking,Dawkins V The faithful

Jonty wrote:I agree that parental attitudes are very important in fostering bigotry. It's also a fact that there has in the recent past been widespread prejudice against Roman Catholics. Roman Catholic emancipation in the UK only occurred in about 1829, I believe, which is relatively recent. There are all sorts of reasons for this including Roman Catholicism being associated with absolutism, "Rome-Rule", and the need to stop the religion of the people having to change ever time a monarch died and replaced by another one who supported a different brand of christianity.
There is a terrible historical baggage on all of this including the Pope supporting the conquest of Ireland by the English; the Pope giving his blessing and support to the Armada; the Pope absolving anyone who murdered Elizabeth 1; and for that matter the Pope being instrumental in starting the Crusades.

Yes, the relatively modern development of true religious freedom is reall blessing (if you'll forgive the pun :D) However, don't forget, it was that devout English Catholic ("Defender of the Faith") Henry VIII who really set the ball rolling! Anti-catholic sentiment in Britian dates from that time and was closely allied to politics (the two were inseperable at that time).

Jonty wrote:Nevertheless, I still think that it is desirable for young people not to be segregated along religious lines when receiving their education. Education IMO should be provided by state schools
It's a perfectly valid opinion but not one you'd expect me to agree with.

Jonty wrote:Those who want an education provided by a religious body should pay for it.
We already do, through our taxes!

Jonty wrote:I find your comment about no recent history of sectarianism in England interesting. In my view that's because the English are exceptionally tolerant; much more so that the Scots or the Irish, or any other nation I'm aware of. IMHO perhaps they're too tolerant and sleep-walking into future problems.
jonty

I think it's partly English tolerance, perhaps fostered by being a larger and therefore more diverse country than Scotland? However, it's also down to the nature of the established faith in the respective countries. In Scotland it was Presbyterian in nature - no bishops, no hierarchy, few sacraments, the Bible and lots of preaching; the exact opposite of Catholicism. Remember, in Scotland when the English King (a Scot by the way) tried to impose bishops the covenanters revolted and many were executed a result. In England, the reformed church was more Catholic in nature with the monarch at its head instead of the Pope, so the differences were, in reality. much less.
by Kevin K
20 Sep 2010, 5:13pm
Forum: The Tea Shop
Topic: Hawking,Dawkins V The faithful
Replies: 394
Views: 12602

Re: Hawking,Dawkins V The faithful

kwackers wrote:The whole hierarchy of powerful people imposing their will (and it is their will) on billions of their followers and enjoying great privilege.
Kwakers, I'm free to join or leave the Church as I wish; no one is imposing anything on me or anyone else. "Their will" as you put it, is the received teaching of the Church over 2,000 years. Disagree by all means, but please don't misrepresent.
by Kevin K
20 Sep 2010, 4:54pm
Forum: The Tea Shop
Topic: Hawking,Dawkins V The faithful
Replies: 394
Views: 12602

Re: Hawking,Dawkins V The faithful

Jonty wrote:You can see no evidence that faith schools cause division in the "recently-sectarian" west of Scotland? The inability to see evidence does not prove absence of evidence. Perhaps you should look a little harder. jonty
I have. The roots of sectarianism in Scotland are deep and closely allied to the mass working class Irish immigration of the 19th century. Take the (now repudiated) 1923 Church of Scotland report as an example. It was entitled "The Menace of the Irish Race to our Scottish Nationality" which accused the Catholic population of subverting Presbyterian values and of causing drunkenness, crime and financial imprudence.

Even after WWII Catholic ex-servicemen looking for work would see notices saying "Catholics need not apply". In relatively recent times, employers would casually ask what football team you support or which school you went to to judge "which foot you kicked with".

No, bigoted children stem from bigoted parents, pure and simple.

If Catholic schools are the cause, why is there no recent history of sectarianism in England, where there have been Catholic schools since the late 19th century?

For more information on this subject I recommend "Scotland's Shame" edited by Tom Devine.