Search found 1148 matches

by Bez
1 Jan 2020, 9:29pm
Forum: On the road
Topic: Why wear black?
Replies: 784
Views: 26679

Re: Why wear black?

Cowsham wrote:How could you reflect on that event the second way ?


Surely that's quite simple? When it comes to cycling, I assume you're comfortable with the idea that any event that exhibited risk to you is something you look back on and ask yourself "what could I do differently next time to mitigate that risk?" (So your near-victim, for instance, might be thinking of adding a second rear light). All that's needed is to react similarly to events in which you participate that exhibit risk to other people: what could you have done differently to mitigate the risk? Answers might include driving more slowly.

Sadly, few people seem to have that reaction to risks that others face. Normally they just get angry. It's an emotional shield.

Cowsham wrote:A B road speed limit is 50 MPH.


As is oft said: it's a limit, not a target.
by Bez
1 Jan 2020, 4:55pm
Forum: On the road
Topic: Why wear black?
Replies: 784
Views: 26679

Re: Why wear black?

Cowsham wrote:Nearly killed a guy wearing all black gear at a bend in the road -- he hadn't realised his rear light had went out ( faulty ) I only missed him cos I saw a feint glimmer from one of his muddy pedal reflectors at the last moment or he most certainly would be dead.

I wear two rear lights and hi vis top and backpack. Yes I look like a dork but it's better than dead. You will be cool enough when your dead.


There are at least two possible ways in which that event could be reflected upon:

1. "Well, that certainly vindicates my own clothing decisions."

2. "If I'm driving at a speed whereby I'm certain I'm going to kill someone whose light has failed, maybe I could slow down a bit."
by Bez
31 Dec 2019, 12:54pm
Forum: On the road
Topic: Why wear black?
Replies: 784
Views: 26679

Re: Why wear black?

wearwell wrote:You can feel the difference if you put one on, over your black T shirt. Especially if it's rush hour. Traffic immediately gives you wider passing space, or slows down etc. It's automatic reflex to high viz yellow


Yesterday I noticed a lot of drivers unusually stopping to let me through on country lanes.

Not sure whether I should attribute this to my front light, lack of helmet, yellow boots, or what. But the light is new and I'd like to feel reassured about the money I spent on it, so I'm going to say it's the light. So you should get a light like mine, because traffic immediately gives you more space and slows to a stop: it's an automatic reflex to a nice light.
by Bez
31 Dec 2019, 12:46pm
Forum: Does anyone know … ?
Topic: Southampton Cycling Infrastructure
Replies: 17
Views: 815

Re: Southampton Cycling Infrastructure

Marcus Aurelius wrote:Southampton soon will be as easy to navigate ( by bike) as Portsmouth is.


Image
by Bez
30 Dec 2019, 9:36pm
Forum: Bikes & Bits – Technical section
Topic: Using a Powerbank to charge a Garmin Edge whilst riding
Replies: 20
Views: 1387

Re: Using a Powerbank to charge a Garmin Edge whilst riding

RickH wrote:Connecting & disconnecting repeatedly doesn't seem to have any adverse effect.


On occasions in the past I've run Edges and eTrexes directly from dyno power (ie without a cache battery in the middle, but with proper circuitry) and after some distance of fluctuating power they always went a bit hatstand and had to be restarted. Maybe the 1000 is a little more reliable (though for whatever reason, I don't remember mine fondly) or maybe you've not cycled the power enough… it did take a while to start getting drunk.

Will be interested to see which power banks stay on and keep the Garmin topped up, though. I currently have an Edge Explore, which I like more than most Garmins, but the battery life is a little short. I'd quite like the ability to set off with an external supply switched on and be able to forget about it all day.
by Bez
28 Dec 2019, 11:46pm
Forum: Bikes & Bits – Technical section
Topic: Using a Powerbank to charge a Garmin Edge whilst riding
Replies: 20
Views: 1387

Re: Using a Powerbank to charge a Garmin Edge whilst riding

Every power bank I’ve ever used has turned itself off a short while after whatever it’s charging has decided it’s full and doesn’t want more juice. Which would make it perfectly normal to arrive home with less than 100% on the Garmin.

That said, if you can do 140km with the Garmin only losing 14% of charge then you either ride very fast indeed or it’s spent a fair amount of time rattling around near 100% before deciding it’s full for long enough for the power bank to switch off.

Next time I would wait for the Garmin to drop to about 50% before plugging in the power pack, and see what happens.
by Bez
26 Dec 2019, 10:16am
Forum: Does anyone know … ?
Topic: Gloves: Lobster vs Trigger
Replies: 6
Views: 593

Re: Gloves: Lobster vs Trigger

I’ve got “triggers” (aka 3+1s). They’re absolutely ace on drop bars. Hard to find, though.
by Bez
24 Dec 2019, 2:09am
Forum: On the road
Topic: Why wear black?
Replies: 784
Views: 26679

Re: Why wear black?

Marcus Aurelius wrote:You’re not thinking particularly clearly. What if you get separated from your bike / ‘bent / whatever


Maybe I'm not thinking clearly. Is there a scenario where this happens on the road at night which isn't either (a) massively unlikely, eg you somehow come off the bike and land unconscious in the carriageway while the bike bounces out of sight, or (b) entirely ridiculous, eg you suddenly notice that you're unexpectedly walking and your bike fell off half a mile back? I get separated from my bike when I stop at a petrol station for coffee, but I don't think wearing dark clothes would increase someone's chances of being run over while punching buttons on the Costa Express machine next to the tills.

Marcus Aurelius wrote:or the lights fail


Personally I tend to have two plus reflectors and I look behind myself on a regular basis to check that all is well but, granted, even then it's a tiny mathematical possibility. You have successfully identified a risk which, should I choose to wear black clothes, I will have failed to have eliminated.

Marcus Aurelius wrote:or you’re stood away from your nice bright, well lit bike / trike / quadricycle / whatever. trying to fix a mechanical?


Who stands away from their bike whilst standing in the road? How do you even fix a mechanical without standing next to the bike that has the mechanical problem? (Presumably Mr Tickle, but he's bright orange.) Why would you stand in the road to fix a mechanical? I'm struggling with this one. I might still not be thinking clearly.

Marcus Aurelius wrote:Don’t think just about when you’re on the bike / quadricycle / ordinary / velocipede.


So you never go walking in dark clothes, then? And presumably you think anyone who does is suicidal even if they're carrying lights?
by Bez
23 Dec 2019, 10:54pm
Forum: On the road
Topic: Why wear black?
Replies: 784
Views: 26679

Re: Why wear black?

Marcus Aurelius wrote:risk reduction, as far as possible, is never a bad idea


Of course it is. Otherwise you’d reduce your risk of a cycling-related injury by not cycling.

Marcus Aurelius wrote:wearing totally black kit, in low visibility conditions is beyond daft / stupid / suicidal.


What, even if you’re riding a bike decked out in multiple lights and reflectors? What about if you’re on a recumbent and your clothing is less visible? A velomobile, perhaps.

I fail to see how black clothes paired with excellent lights is “stupid” or “suicidal”.

If it is, what non-black colours qualify as non-suicidal? It would help to know where the line between suicidal stupidity and commendable subservience to others’ inattention is to be drawn.
by Bez
23 Dec 2019, 10:47pm
Forum: On the road
Topic: Why wear black?
Replies: 784
Views: 26679

Re: Why wear black?

If you were wearing black, the media might imply that you were partly responsible by way of not wearing bright colours.

If you were wearing bright colours, the media will state the fact clearly, which will reinforce prejudices about clothing and conspicuity, and will thus enhance their ability to imply that others in future incidents will have been partly responsible by way of not wearing bright colours.

They’ll get their way whatever you choose, you needn’t worry about that.
by Bez
23 Dec 2019, 9:50am
Forum: On the road
Topic: Why wear black?
Replies: 784
Views: 26679

Re: Why wear black?

I use lights 24/7 too, partly so I don’t feel any need to wear clothes I don’t like :)
by Bez
23 Dec 2019, 12:07am
Forum: The Tea Shop
Topic: New iPhone
Replies: 42
Views: 1451

Re: New iPhone

mercalia wrote:so how much does it cost to replace a battery?


https://support.apple.com/en-gb/iphone/ ... tery-power
by Bez
22 Dec 2019, 2:54pm
Forum: The Tea Shop
Topic: New iPhone
Replies: 42
Views: 1451

Re: New iPhone

IIRC the SEII is a larger case.


Oh, there have been all sorts of rumours about an SE2 for years now. I'll not believe anything till I see it. I suspect a lot will hinge on what Apple thinks people value most about the SE: the lower price or the smaller size. So I'd expect either a 7/8-sized form factor at a lower price, or a smaller form factor with a full-frame screen and Face ID, but who knows until it appears—if it does.

Personally all I want is waterproofing, better battery life and a better camera, and I'd pay more for all that in an SE-sized phone.
by Bez
22 Dec 2019, 2:27pm
Forum: The Tea Shop
Topic: New iPhone
Replies: 42
Views: 1451

Re: New iPhone

Mrs Mick F bought one on eBay. £149.99 64Gb


You should shop around… I picked up a 128GB 7 on a Giffgaff Black Friday deal for £169, plus (in theory at least) £50 cashback :) The 7 seems like the sweet spot for iPhone cheapskates at the moment. The price jump up to the 8 is quite considerable.

Did you know that a iphone se is a 6 in a 5 package! IIRC it out performs the 6 in several fields?


It'll outperform the 6 because it's a 6S inside, not a 6 ;) It has a lesser front-facing camera and no 3D touch but in all other respects is a 6S.

I still like my SE best. Nice size, usable one-handed, and easy not to drop. I'll probably sell the 7 and wait to see if the SE2 ever materialises.
by Bez
22 Dec 2019, 2:15pm
Forum: On the road
Topic: Why wear black?
Replies: 784
Views: 26679

Re: Why wear black?

reohn2 wrote:
Bez wrote:
Wearing black on my upper body the bike is a no,no for me


Out of interest, what colour(s) are your trousers/leggings/shorts/tights?

FIFM :wink: :mrgreen:


Right… as suspected, but therein lies the point: it's quite curious to be dogmatic about the upper body, saying "black is a no-no", and then to wear black on your lower half. Especially since it's the lower half which is in constant motion and therefore offers the greater opportunity for conspicuity.

The thing is, the matter of drawing a line between maximum conspicuity and acceptable comfort/expense/aesthetics/etc is a massively subjective one. You, I suspect, like almost everyone, feel awkward in brightly coloured trousers. You feel less awkward about wearing a brightly coloured jacket. These reactions are completely normal.

It's also completely normal to not like brightly coloured clothing at all, whether leggings or jackets, or to not want to have to spend money replacing a functional black piece of clothing with a brightly coloured one.

Everyone has their threshold. Just as with anything else: the threat from motor vehicles isn't massively different when you're walking to when you're cycling, but society has come to normalise helmets for cycling and not walking, nor even driving. Hence the earlier reference to the "if it saves one life" hypocrisy. I've yet to meet anyone that believes a helmet could save a life on a bicycle who applies it to the possibility of losing their own life: not one of them would wear a helmet to walk down the street, despite the indisputable possibility of dying that way. They'd feel uncomfortable and awkward doing that; it would be an inconvenience and an extra cost to them.

It's the same thing here. The fact that the OP draws his own line at a certain point doesn't mean everyone else will, or even should. To believe otherwise is to take a stroll through the 5 o'clock to the 7 o'clock region of the cognitive bias codex.