Search found 147 matches

by bikegeek
5 Feb 2010, 1:44pm
Forum: Does anyone know … ?
Topic: Ribble or Dawes Audax for light touring?
Replies: 7
Views: 3192

Re: Ribble or Dawes Audax for light touring?

I'd say the ribble. Alu frame, matt black paintjob, carbon fibre forks, good drivetrain & finishing kit. Hard to beat for the money. I've got one as my winter bike, but in the summer I take the mudguards off & ride it regularly on long fast clubruns - no problems. The frame is bombproof and the stickers can be easily removed to help meet criteria no.5. It has mounting points for racks on the rear.

Hope this helps, P.
by bikegeek
5 Feb 2010, 1:28pm
Forum: Does anyone know … ?
Topic: small bike pumps
Replies: 10
Views: 1017

Re: small bike pumps

Welcome David.h,

I've got one of these..
http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Mode ... delID=2904

It works, but 250 compressions to get a 700x23mm tyre to 110psi gives your pecs a good workout. If you've had no luck with Topeak before you'll prob want something different.
See here for some things that have poor recommendations & are probably best avoided..
viewtopic.php?f=1&t=19854&start=30&hilit=Uselessness

Top of page 3 has pumps.

I've heard good things about these..
http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Mode ... elID=31249
Although I've no personal experience of them.

Cheers, P.
by bikegeek
5 Feb 2010, 12:18pm
Forum: Bikes & Bits – Technical section
Topic: Tip - fitting Schwalbe Marathon Plus Tyres
Replies: 91
Views: 197668

Re: Tip - fitting Schwalbe Marathon Plus Tyres

Just been reading this & I wondered, does anyone stretch their new tyres, like you would a tubular?

I had some 20mm Schwable clinchers for racing & had to give them a good stretch before fitting them on some Ksyrium wheels.

What do we think?
P.
by bikegeek
5 Feb 2010, 11:52am
Forum: Bikes & Bits – Technical section
Topic: Buying/fitting road tyres to a mountain bike
Replies: 19
Views: 13733

Re: Buying/fitting road tyres to a mountain bike

Mark - I've seen those pinheads on a bike with hope hubs before. The colour goes v.well with the gold hub & the shape of the heads look neat too. Alas, I could only afford the bog standard allen key ones, you've got more cash for bikestuff than me! lucky b..

Cheers, P.
by bikegeek
5 Feb 2010, 11:44am
Forum: Bikes & Bits – Technical section
Topic: Brought a used Giant OCR3. 2nd modification- Rack + Panniers
Replies: 31
Views: 3893

Re: Brought a used Giant OCR3. 1st modifications - sdp pedals?

You're welcome bfbf,

The Vans do look good. Wiggle have them for a bit less than rrp at the moment..
http://www.wiggle.co.uk/p/cycle/7/Vans_ ... 360046167/
I reckon these are nicer tho..
http://www.wiggle.co.uk/p/cycle/7/SixSi ... 360035086/
And these are growing on me too. If I was a bit younger I'd have 'em..
http://www.wiggle.co.uk/p/cycle/7/Shima ... 360038673/

Cheers, P.
by bikegeek
5 Feb 2010, 11:29am
Forum: Bikes & Bits – Technical section
Topic: Cartridge system
Replies: 29
Views: 19847

Re: Cartridge system

matt2matt2002 wrote:Many thanks rehon2
Good advice - and nearer the time of my departure I plan to spend some time on a 1 2 1 basis at my LBS
I hope some of my recent questions haven't appeared too dumb for those folk here.
(The one I asked about the value of peddling down hill raised quite a few opinions)


Many thanks for your and other comments



No problem, Matt. Not too dumb at all, you're doin the right thing educating yourself before heading off into the wilds. You'd be suprised at the number of people who can't even sort out a flat tyre for themselves. We love to share our knowledge/get into discussions too, so keep the queries coming-any excuse for a bit of bikegeekery! :) .
All that can be done here, however, is post comments & show photos. That's no substitute for hands on. It is important to drill yourself with repairs & servicing before you leave the house lest you look like a gumby at the side of the road.
A half decent mechanic can show you little tips and give you practical supervision while you have the tools in your hands. All we can do is talk you through the theory. It's all well and good to describe how to do adjustments/repairs, but you need to feel the things out yourself.

I don't know where you live or when you're going, but the Edinburgh Bike Co-op do courses & have branches nationwide. See if you can get to one of those. Click this..
http://www.edinburghbicycle.com/comms/s ... cardinal=8

Also, if you go to a decent bike shop & tell them you're doing round the world, they'll be happy to help you as it's such a mammoth undertaking, and probably something they have dreamed about doing themselves but never will. For them, knowing that they have offered support to someone who is will be reward enough.
Good Luck, P.
by bikegeek
5 Feb 2010, 11:05am
Forum: Bikes & Bits – Technical section
Topic: Cartridge system
Replies: 29
Views: 19847

Re: Cartridge system

[quote="CREPELLO but why would you prefer a cage with less balls for the bearing race, when you can buy high grade loose balls and fit more in the headset? More balls = less load per ball and more even wear for the entire assembly, no?[/quote]

No, no. We're both on the same page with this. In order of preference I'd have Loose, then caged, then cartridge. You're spot on with your thinking on loose bb's & load distribution.
Now, just to mix it up a little, what do we think of needle bearings? (I've seen plenty of those & all have been caged).

Cheers, P.
by bikegeek
4 Feb 2010, 11:58am
Forum: Bikes & Bits – Technical section
Topic: Brooks saddles
Replies: 16
Views: 1122

Re: Brooks saddles

Lots of Brooks fans on this forum being that its the saddle of choice for most tourists. I've a B17 myself and it does have some plus points, but it weighs a ton and I find that I prefer the Selle Italia one on my winterbike. For me, good shorts and cream make all the difference. I have some PI shorts, Aldi padded pants & use boots nappy cream. £3odd per big tub, same active ingredients as assoss. Can't remember the last time I had a sore nether region.

Worst saddle I had was one with a hole in the middle. Looked something like this.. http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Mode ... elID=22000 . Nightmare. Wish I'd kept it though, I could have sold it to Antonish..Hehe...

If you can do 60 odd miles OK then I'd stick with what you've got. Just keep your shorts in good nick & your bits clean whilst you're away.

P.
by bikegeek
4 Feb 2010, 11:37am
Forum: Bikes & Bits – Technical section
Topic: Cartridge system
Replies: 29
Views: 19847

Re: Cartridge system

I know a guy who gets wheel bearings in cartridges from a non-cycling source, so I'll ask him for the details next time I see him. He reckons its a 40% saving.
My problem with cartridges is the replacement frequency and the fact that they're never fully sealed. Once water gets in, you're beat. See my comments on Hollowtech above. Thankfully h'sets are less exposed that b.brackets.
I'd rather have caged over cartridge and loose over caged anyday. What do the experts think - CJ, MickF?

Cheers, P.
by bikegeek
4 Feb 2010, 11:13am
Forum: Bikes & Bits – Technical section
Topic: Brought a used Giant OCR3. 2nd modification- Rack + Panniers
Replies: 31
Views: 3893

Re: Brought a used Giant OCR3. 1st modifications - sdp pedals?

bfbf wrote:ETA seem to offer insurance for around £24 which seems good, can I enter the used value for the bike?


As the cover gives new-for-old replacement, I'd be tempted to put what you paid for it. Anyone else got any ideas?

P.


Spd shoes are a real personal choice.. There's cool ones like these..
http://www.bikeradar.com/news/article/f ... hoes-23807
http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Mode ... delID=7610

Trainer style..
http://www.wiggle.co.uk/p/cycle/7/Shima ... 360033529/
http://www.bikemagic.com/bike-reviews/s ... /5444.html

Trekker style ones like these..
http://www.jejamescycles.co.uk/shimano- ... 52627.html

Racin' ones like these..
http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Mode ... delID=9115

Wiggle have loads here..
http://www.wiggle.co.uk/ra/cycle/7/402/ ... 4wodWXGlGw

It really depends on the fit & fashion you're after. All bike shoes tend to be quite narrow with a snug fit, so your foot won't move around too much inside them whilst pedalling. This means that you haven't got as much room for thick socks come winter as you would in normal shoes.
Best advice is to go to a shop & try on a few pairs. Take extra socks with you too & try with different thickness layers on your feet. I wouldn't buy mailorder until I had tried them on in a shop first.

Uppers..
Better to get shoes which seem a bit large rather than a bit tight. See that they have room for extra insoles if the supplied one is thin. (or you might even want one of these gizmos.. http://www.maplin.co.uk/module.aspx?moduleno=218156 ) Make sure you can get overshoes on which won't crush the shoe onto your foot. Decide if you want lace up or velcro strap fitting. Beware of ratchet strap buckles as these can weaken over time. Make sure that any laces won't get caught up on the bike.
Soles..
Walking or race? Trekker style have grips similar to hiking boots/technical trainers. Practical, but not as cool as trainer style (Vans, etc.). More chance that the girls will still like you if you have the trainer style, more chance they'll think you're a bit geeky if you have trekker or race.
Stiffness..
Race style have a much stiffer sole so pedalling is easier, as the downward pressure from the foot is supported over a greater surface area, but walking is more awkward. Non race has a more flexible sole for ease when walking. With the more flexible sole you might get a bit of irritation around the balls of your feet as your foot curls round the pedal. The longer you ride, the more likely this is.
Waterproofing..
There is currently no such thing as waterproof bike footwear. Some solutions are available. Some better than others, but none totally successful. Overshoes, waterproof socks, winterboots, etc will all allow your feet to get wet eventually. One top tip is to use some sealant on the soles to plug the gaps around the cleats. Another is to wear windproof socks to help keep your wet feet warm against windchill. Ensuring that you can wiggle your toes inside the footwear will help with circulation.
Cost..
Shoes can be as much as you want to pay. Prices start at under £20 in the bigger stores like Decathlon. Expect to pay more if buying from an inde shop. Sidi racing shoes go up to over £250, more if you want the heated versions. But they are a bit of Bling. Overshoe prices start around £20, £30+ being typical for something good. Don't buy Sealskin socks, they are a waste of money.

Hope this helps, P.
by bikegeek
4 Feb 2010, 9:54am
Forum: Bikes & Bits – Technical section
Topic: Replacing gears
Replies: 13
Views: 580

Re: Replacing gears

Wise words from cycleruk, second that.
by bikegeek
4 Feb 2010, 9:38am
Forum: Bikes & Bits – Technical section
Topic: Cartridge system
Replies: 29
Views: 19847

Re: Cartridge system

Hi CREPELLO, the majority of lower-end headsets do now come with cartridges as standard. A lot of higher-end ones do too, but they will have a better quality sealed unit which will last longer & be better made, or so the company marketing man will tell you. On the cheaper ones the cartridge tends to be a throwaway after 12mths part. Dearer ones throwaway after a little longer, but still throwaway. (Anyone with American Classics wheels will know all about the hassles & costs of replacing cartridges). And I'd say a lot of dealers will give you the spcheel about the type of cartridge you need not being available when you need one, so buy a whole new unit, cups & all, because they can't be bothered to source one, even though they are easy to come by if you look for a non-cycling bearing supplier.

Example of a generic cartridge here..
http://www.sjscycles.co.uk/product-Cane ... -20756.htm

Example of complete 'sealed' (cartridge) headset here..
http://www.sjscycles.co.uk/product-Unbr ... k-5012.htm

Notice the price difference for a similar looking design.

I can't say for certain which h'set Matt2 has on his bike. Just knowing the bike make&model doesn't help much as often bits of finishing kit will alter with each batch build. Matt, can you give us any more info on the part so we can search for it?

I reckon that the cartridge development is a backward step and have always preferred user servicable bearings, alas nowadays they are becoming the exception rather than the norm, but moreovere a sign of quality.
I've had problems over the last year with Shimano Hollowtech II bearings failing after just one wet ride. Mr S & his network of dealers say replace the cups (£20+ each time! - No way). I've even read on here people saying 'well, I'll just get a new one, it's only £20odd'. So, at 3 per year x 5 years how much are you gonna spend on axle bearings, never mind the time & wasted materials, Jeez!! one born every day.
I've kept mine alive by using aerosol grease sprayed in through the tiny gap on the inside of the unit. Sealed my ar$e! Pain in the ar$e more like.. How I wish the seals could be improved. Or done away with..
To quote you, Crepello- Why would Dawes fit a bog standard headset to their flagship model, and something better to their basic model??? - I don't think they have. The user servicable loose bearings are just better. Are they defo still available on the newer models - anyone?

Cheers, P.
by bikegeek
3 Feb 2010, 4:55pm
Forum: Bikes & Bits – Technical section
Topic: Cartridge system
Replies: 29
Views: 19847

Re: Cartridge system

CREPELLO wrote: I may be wrong, but the wording could refer to caged ball bearings which run on the permanently fitted headset races, just as traditional loose bearings would.


It wouldn't be described as Cartridge then.

CREPELLO wrote:If these bearings go rusty and wear the races out you'll need the entire headset replacing at a LBS.


If they were to go rusty, you'd feel it getting stiff & get it sorted before any permanent damage was done.

P.
by bikegeek
3 Feb 2010, 3:45pm
Forum: Bikes & Bits – Technical section
Topic: Brought a used Giant OCR3. 2nd modification- Rack + Panniers
Replies: 31
Views: 3893

Re: Brought a used Giant OCR3. 1st modifications - sdp pedals?

I don't mean to freak you out, but have you see the latest toys for chavs?

http://www.screwfix.com/prods/71878/Pow ... rinder-18V
http://www.screwfix.com/prods/24625/Pow ... urpose-Saw

Scroats have an answer for everything these days.

P.
by bikegeek
3 Feb 2010, 3:22pm
Forum: Bikes & Bits – Technical section
Topic: Cartridge system
Replies: 29
Views: 19847

Re: Cartridge system

Right Matt2, headsets today, is it? OK, here's the gen..

This guy explains it best...
http://sheldonbrown.com/headsets.html

See also his notes on 'Steerer' & 'Head tube' (no sniggering!)
In the picture on the right, where he marks 'no wrench flats', the arrow points to where the ball bearings for steering are. (there's another set at the other end of the headtube, not shown in the photo). On yours they are contained in a sealed cartridge. They're made to be fit & forget, and if they do go wrong you just pop in a new cartridge. Less messey than working with individual ball bearings & pots of grease.

As for handlebar height, you photo shows that the stem is as high as it will go. Altering the angle of the stem will give you a bit more height, but it will also bring the bars closer to you altering the 'reach' (your position) and subsequently the feel of the steering.

As stoobs says, if you need to raise the bar height any more, you'll need one of these.. (others are available)
http://www.sjscycles.co.uk/cid/WXP7W1SO ... -16189.htm
the alternative would be to fit forks with a longer steerer tube. This would be expensive & a bit wrong, as your bike is brand new.

Take care not to stretch the cables too when raising the bars.

Hope this helps, P.