Search found 2139 matches

by slowster
14 Jun 2021, 2:13pm
Forum: The Tea Shop
Topic: I wonder if.......
Replies: 42
Views: 660

Re: I wonder if.......

What partly makes Ian Wright's story so powerful is the fact that his experience was exceptional, when it should have been commonplace. The fact that it has attracted so much attention, and has been mentioned on this thread, is itself indicative that many more people's experience of far too many teachers, not just sports teachers, was of teaching that was at best mediocre and often poor.

The implication that teachers might need to spend much more time and effort on a few who are already talented or have obvious potential, so that those pupils can achieve that potential, and in so doing neglect their pupils with less talent and aptitude is a false dilemma. Ian Wright's teacher, Mr Pigeon, was more likely to have been a damn good teacher who did the best for all his pupils.

Teaching pupils who are already interested in the subject/activity, and have an aptitude or talent for it, is easy. It is the hallmark of a lazy teacher who chooses to put more time and effort into those pupils than those who struggle. The hallmark of a good teacher is one who can motivate and engage those who have previously shown little ability.
by slowster
14 Jun 2021, 11:47am
Forum: The Tea Shop
Topic: I wonder if.......
Replies: 42
Views: 660

Re: I wonder if.......

Ben@Forest wrote: 13 Jun 2021, 10:26pm So you'd deny it ever opens up opportunties to everyone else?
Too many sports teachers couldn't. By that I mean they could not teach and encourage their pupils how to enjoy a sport or physical activity. Far too many of them were only interested in pupils who already enjoyed sport, were already good at it, and were already of above average fitness. But those pupils were mostly only like that because someone else had taught and encouraged them. Those teachers didn't teach, they just played at being teachers.

It was those teachers who had opportunities and wasted them, because of the often significant numbers of children and teenagers who passed through their hands during formative years and were left as a result of their actions with an abiding dislike of sport or exercise.

The reason why the clip below resonated with so many people, was because it did reflect the experience of far too many children of games and PE lessons at school.

by slowster
13 Jun 2021, 9:29pm
Forum: Bikes & Bits – Technical section
Topic: Front shifting help
Replies: 5
Views: 204

Re: Front shifting help

neilob wrote: 13 Jun 2021, 8:06pmmy problem is identifying a compatible MTB shifter which is braze on. Do such things exist?
No.

In the absence of a solution which increases the effective length of the derailleur actuator arm to match the greater length of cable pulled by your MTB shifter, I think you would need to change the left hand shifter for either a Sora shifter (expensive, although because you get both front and rear shifters, you would also end up with a spare rear shifter since 9 speed road and MTB rear derailleurs use the same cable pull), or a LH/front friction shifter that will mount on the bars.

https://www.spacycles.co.uk/m8b0s108p37 ... Bar-Levers

https://www.sjscycles.co.uk/gear-shifte ... left-hand/

https://www.sjscycles.co.uk/gear-shifte ... left-only/
by slowster
13 Jun 2021, 4:33pm
Forum: Touring & Expedition
Topic: upgrading bikes from Dawes Karakums to?????
Replies: 35
Views: 952

Re: upgrading bikes from Dawes Karakums to?????

Re
beeb wrote: 13 Jun 2021, 7:08am now looking to create a list of 13kg or less bikes
A Rohloff typically weighs a few hundred grams more than a similar derailleur set up. Most Rohloff equipped bikes on the market will probably weigh more than your Karakums. Especially so if they have disc brakes, since those add another >0.5kg compared with a pair of V brakes.

If the Thorn Rohloff models would be too heavy, I would suggest you speak to Oxford Bike Works to see what he (and Lee Cooper) would suggest in response to your weight requirements and wheel size preference(s).

I suspect that as well as V brakes, one of their suggestions might be to have a traditional 1" threaded steerer. Years ago when discussing steel forks and 1" vs 1 1/8" steerers, Chas Roberts placed a length of 1 1/8" steerer tube in my hand to drive home how heavy it was and persuade me to go with his recommendation of a 1" steerer. A touring bike with a 1 1/8" steerer tube long enough to get the bars level with the saddle probably weighs significantly more than a threaded steerer set up.

I think 1 1/8" threadless steerers are superior for off road bikes, but for road touring 1" threaded is better not only because it is lighter, but also because the combination of quill stem, smaller clamp diameter bars, narrower head tube and steerer etc. absorbs more road buzz and gives a better ride. If the bars need to be very high, e.g. higher than the saddle, a Nitto quill stem with 280mm shaft can be used.
by slowster
12 Jun 2021, 10:20pm
Forum: Touring & Expedition
Topic: upgrading bikes from Dawes Karakums to?????
Replies: 35
Views: 952

Re: upgrading bikes from Dawes Karakums to?????

nsew wrote: 12 Jun 2021, 8:53pm If a 120kg cycle tourer wanting to haul around 50kg of stuff went to a frame builder they’d be built a bike not dissimilar to the 18kg Nomad. As it is the OP and his wife are both 5’ 5”, don’t need to carry more than 25kg between them, will be riding in Western Europe and probably want to have an enjoyable time of it. The frame builder would build lively bikes in the region of 12kg.
You've just brought it home to me that when I ride back from the supermarket with two full panniers, I am often lugging more weight than a full camping load, and the route is largely off-road. So I probably do place more importance on frame strength and stiffness than the OP needs to. Whenever I see an expedition type bike, the first question that goes through my mind is whether it would be suitable for the supermarket run.
by slowster
12 Jun 2021, 8:47pm
Forum: Touring & Expedition
Topic: upgrading bikes from Dawes Karakums to?????
Replies: 35
Views: 952

Re: upgrading bikes from Dawes Karakums to?????

OP, do you use both front and rear panniers on your Karakums? If so it might be worth seeing if you could instead get all your kit in two rear panniers/on the top of the rear rack and in a bar bag. As wheelyhappy99 says, when you are transporting your bikes it makes life easier if you have fewer bags. If you are unsure, maybe do a short overnight tour to see if it would work for you with just rear panniers. If you conclude front panniers will be essential or that you must at least have the option of using them, it seems from Thorn's description that might rule out the 700C version of the Nomad.

Given that you have now indicated that these will be dedicated expedition bikes used solely for loaded touring, and you have other bikes for day rides etc., I would not be too bothered about the frame weight or opting for a lighter frame. Any differences in weight between the frames you are considering will be trivial in the context of your all up weight (bike, luggage and rider). If you want to save weight, I would look elsewhere on the bike and in your kit.

Incidentally, Thorn spec the 700C Nomad with the Tubus Airy rack, which weighs only 230g. However, to my recollection it is a fairly minimalist rack, probably better suited to use with smaller panniers (e.g. Ortlieb Sport Rollers). More importantly it has a very small narrow top area. It would not be my choice because I would want a wider/longer top deck to lash stuff onto (tent, dry bag or whatever). I would instead choose either the stainless steel Cosmo (810g) or the new titanium Liviano (500g).
by slowster
12 Jun 2021, 12:10pm
Forum: Touring & Expedition
Topic: upgrading bikes from Dawes Karakums to?????
Replies: 35
Views: 952

Re: upgrading bikes from Dawes Karakums to?????

beeb wrote: 12 Jun 2021, 7:40am Does our height have any bearing on best wheel size. We are both about 5 ft 5. Hadn't realised 26" wheels were becoming a problem in terms of sourcing tyres. As we will mostly be in Europe is 700c the best route for us ?
Thanks for raising this.
Firstly, don't just take my word for it. Thorn can probably advise you, and it would be worth doing a bit of basic research yourself, but there have been numerous comments about this issue over the last few years, e.g.

Chris Juden - viewtopic.php?p=1610884#p1610884

Brucey - viewtopic.php?p=1542493#p1542493

Willem Jongman - viewtopic.php?p=1523626#p1523626

I don't think height matters as such, but toe overlap can be an issue for smaller riders with 700C wheels vs 26". A small bit of toe overlap is usually not a big issue riding on the road (as opposed to tricky off-road trails), because it would not be noticeable except when doing a very low speed tight turn, but I would still want it to have been designed out on an expensive touring bike, especially if it's for flat bars (it can be more problematic designing it out on small drop barred bikes, which necessarily have shorter top tubes).

I think the Karakum has 700C wheels, so if toe overlap is not a problem for you on those bikes, I would not expect problems with a 700C Nomad from the likes of Thorn. Like 531Colin who designs many of Spa's frames, Andy Blance of Thorn probably pays a lot more attention to this issue than the average mass market bike manufacturer, and the limited geometry information Thorn supplies seems to confirm that, e.g. the shorter top tube versions of the 700C Nomad use a fork with a larger 60mm offset, including the smallest step though 700C Nomad. The geometry charts don't supply the head angles, but I expect those frames also have shallower head angles as well.

That said, life is much easier when the manufacturer provides the front centre measurement (bottom bracket to front axle), like 531Colin/Spa do. If you measure the front centres on your Karakums, and then measure the clearance between the tip of your shoes in/on the pedals from the mudguard with the wheel and shoe at their closest points, you will know what minimum front centre measurement you want/need on any other bike after factoring in any differences like a wider/taller tyre, more mudguard/tyre clearance, or different crank lengths. You could then email Thorn and ask for the front centre measurements of the size(s) you were considering.

650B has recently experienced a huge revival in conjunction with gravel bikes, because many gravel bike riders want a wider tyre than is often possible with 700C wheels on a gravel bike, which typically has relatively limited clearances. So at the moment there is a reasonably good selection of high quality tyres in that size, although many seem to be quite expensive and not so many of them might be as suitable for heavily loaded road touring as a tyre like the 650B Schwalbe Almotion.

Whatever bike choices you make, I think what matters most is going into it with your eyes open. You might decide that all things considered one of Thorn's 26" wheel bike models was best for you, in which case you might need to do as Willem Jongman has done and buy a number of spare tyres now and store them in a cool dark place.
by slowster
11 Jun 2021, 10:34pm
Forum: The Tea Shop
Topic: Dom puts the boot in...
Replies: 121
Views: 3451

Re: Dom puts the boot in...

Recent article on the BBC News website: more than 1 in 10 workers left the hospitality industry last year.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-57241370
by slowster
11 Jun 2021, 10:12pm
Forum: Touring & Expedition
Topic: upgrading bikes from Dawes Karakums to?????
Replies: 35
Views: 952

Re: upgrading bikes from Dawes Karakums to?????

The more information you provide, the more it sounds like a Thorn (or similar like Oxford Bike Works) is what you want.

You might want to start thinking about what tyre size(s) you would need or prefer. Thorn's expedition type bikes have historically been 26", but I note they are now also offering 650B providing front and rear disc brakes are specified, as well as the 700C version of the Nomad.

I suspect that is partly in response to much less choice and availability of good quality 26" tyres for road touring. Basic low quality 26" MTB tyres will probably be available for many years to come, but I would not want to use such tyres for touring, especially not on the road. SJS currently list only 9 folding 26" tyres, and one of the best of those, the Schwalbe Almotion, has already been discontinued. The Almotion is probably a good example of the problem: it is now offered in 650B, but only in one width compared with three different widths in 700C size. Chris Juden wrote on a thread recently that there will always be a good choice of 700C/28" tyres, because so many bikes with that size of tyre are sold every year in Germany.
by slowster
11 Jun 2021, 7:18pm
Forum: Bikes & Bits – Technical section
Topic: Headset Press Disaster
Replies: 36
Views: 1449

Re: Headset Press Disaster

kylecycler wrote: 11 Jun 2021, 7:09pm Apologies for this being a vague and quite possibly stupid question - just thinking out loud but maybe not very cleverly - could you used a rawlbolt to remove and (hopefully) easily re-insert the dust cap in a freehub body, or just hubs in general, without distorting the cap?
....
Sorry for the thread drift but just wondering if a rawlbolt could be used for another purpose, same principle. Or if anyone does it another way?
List of links in Too Good To Lose to various posts by Brucey on Shimano hubs and freehubs:

viewtopic.php?p=1564606#p1564606

Including this one:

viewtopic.php?p=1082177#p1082177
by slowster
11 Jun 2021, 6:05pm
Forum: Bikes & Bits – Technical section
Topic: Headset Press Disaster
Replies: 36
Views: 1449

Re: Headset Press Disaster

Nice work. Thank you for coming back and letting us know how you did it.
by slowster
11 Jun 2021, 5:15pm
Forum: Bikes & Bits – Technical section
Topic: Bob Jackson renovation.
Replies: 10
Views: 437

Re: Bob Jackson renovation.

If the pads in the current brakes cannot be lowered sufficiently for the smaller diameter 700C wheel, Tektro 559 calipers may be the best option since they both have a long drop (55mm-73mm) and are available in old style nut fitting as well as modern recessed allen nut fitting.

https://www.spacycles.co.uk/m7b0s100p14 ... %28pair%29
by slowster
11 Jun 2021, 4:53pm
Forum: Bikes & Bits – Technical section
Topic: Bob Jackson renovation.
Replies: 10
Views: 437

Re: Bob Jackson renovation.

Colin Jenkins wrote: 11 Jun 2021, 3:13pm A decent new 700c wheelset typically has a freehub with 8,9,10 or 11-speed capacity. The Bob Jackson has downtube retro-friction gear shifters, and I anticipate these will not select nicely over such gear clusters. A freehub with 6 or 7 speeds max would, I think, be a better match to the original spirit of the bike.
The problem with Simplex retrofriction levers is the greater length of cable that needs to be pulled for higher speed drivetrains vs the small diameter of the part of the lever around which the cable goes. When this issue came up before in a thread, one sugestion was to slide a piece of electrical insulation over the cable to increase that effective diameter and the resulting amount of cable pulled. Dia Compe make a set of down tube levers with an enlarged barrel for the right hand lever to pull sufficient cable for an 11 speed.

https://www.sjscycles.co.uk/gear-shifte ... -shifters/

In your shoes I would be influenced not only by the availability and cost now of the parts you might need to buy, but also by the likely availability and cost of replacements and spares in future. I still use a bike with a 6 speed freewheel, but I would not be keen on spending much money to replace that wheel with another freewheel hub.

You have not mentioned what the rear axle spacing is (Over Lock Nut), but a bike of that era is likely to have a 120mm OLN (or 126mm at most). 8-11 speed hubs require either 130mm (road hub) or 135mm (MTB hub), so you would need to respace the frame, i.e. either get a framebuilder to do it or DIY, as explained here:

https://www.sheldonbrown.com/frame-spacing.html

If you stick with friction down tube levers it will give you maximum flexibility in what derailleurs and cassettes you can use. If you choose indexed shifters, down tube or otherwise, you will need a compatible cassette and rear derailleur (on the positive side 8, 9 and road 10 speed rear derailleurs all use the same cable pull per shift, but availability of all is limited because they have been discontinued by Shimano).
by slowster
11 Jun 2021, 4:16pm
Forum: Bikes & Bits – Technical section
Topic: Wheels for a big person
Replies: 15
Views: 503

Re: Wheels for a big person

mail@nickavery.com wrote: 11 Jun 2021, 1:28pm I'm slightly confused as to how MTB hubs are both designed for wider tyres (slowster) and more narrow tyres 33mm Challenge Strada Bianca (nez).
Your rim has a 21mm internal width. Mavic recommend tyre widths between 35mm to 69mm for the rim, which is pretty much in line with the ETRTO standard of 35mm to 64mm.

It weighs 448g per rim, which is very light for a touring rim. When gravel bikes appeared on the market there were reports of people choosing MTB rims because they were lighter/cheaper than road rims with a similar internal width, and having problems as a result with tyres blowing off the rims because they were using higher pressures than the MTB rims were designed for. With wide tyres at lower pressures more of the force from impacts when riding will be dissipated by the tyre and the air inside it. With higher pressures necessitated both by narrower tyres and by a relatively heavy rider, more of the impact force will be transmitted to the rim and spokes. I do not know whether it applies to Mavic MTB rims, but I think at least some MTB rims use softer alloys than road and touring rims.
mail@nickavery.com wrote: 11 Jun 2021, 1:28pm I'm rather hoping the solution is narrow tyres as Marathons are great at what they do, but that definitely does not include being fast and comfortable.
If you are using the Plus version of the Marathon, I don't think that is a good match for your rim. The benefit from having a light rim is outweighed by the extra weight of the Marathon Plus, and the comfort advantages of a wide tyre at a low pressure on a wide rim are likely to be lost because Marathon Plus tyres favour being pumped up very hard to improve their rolling resistance.
by slowster
11 Jun 2021, 2:47pm
Forum: Touring & Expedition
Topic: upgrading bikes from Dawes Karakums to?????
Replies: 35
Views: 952

Re: upgrading bikes from Dawes Karakums to?????

Whilst not suggesting that you stick with your Karakums, something to be mindful of in considering new bikes is the potential for a new bike to be heavier, so much so that you might compare it unfavourably with the Karakum, especially in terms of how the bike feels and handles when unladen or with only a light bag for a day ride. If you choose something like the 700C version of the Nomad (which appears to be designed for more lightweight touring than the more expedition focused Thorns) with a Rohloff and hub dynamo etc., I expect it will still be heavier. I would suggest getting rides on Thorn demonstrators if at all possible, but I appreciate that might not be possible for you.

It might be worth comparing the Thorns with a more conventional/classic touring bike, like Spa's flat barred version of its steel or titanium tourer: no step through option, but I expect they could be built up significantly lighter than a Thorn Nomad. Use some of the money you save compared with a Thorn on upgrading your camping and touring kit with the latest lightweight products, and you might find that the result was a bike that when loaded or unloaded was much nicer to ride than a Thorn with a Rohloff.

https://www.spacycles.co.uk/m1b0s225p39 ... ar-9-Speed

Another option might be to go to Woodrup for a custom frame. Woodrup's framebuilder is Kevin Sayle, who was Thorn's custom builder before they switched to outsourcing all their frames (he probably built your tandem). He would be my choice if I wanted a bike that was in the Thorn style but custom built to suit me personally with the optimum balance of strength, luggage carrying capability, handling when loaded and unloaded, and no heavier than it needed to be. It might be that an off the shelf Thorn would fit your own needs perfectly, but that your wife might particularly benefit from going down the custom route.

https://www.woodrupcycles.com/bespoke/rohloff-tour/

As for a dynamo and device charging, I expect new and better storage devices will appear in future years, but hub dynamos themselves appear to be fairly mature products. I would get a Son28 hub simply to have the safety and peace of mind that comes with having reliable lights permanently fitted to a touring bike. The ability to use it with whatever charging technology I might in future choose to buy would just be a bonus.