Search found 286 matches

by Russell160
8 Aug 2018, 7:57pm
Forum: Bikes & Bits – Technical section
Topic: Shimano Front Hub Bearing Size Riddle
Replies: 2
Views: 264

Re: Shimano Front Hub Bearing Size Riddle

Thanks Brucey, that clarifies it. You're right it's not Shimano, my error. The rear hub is a Shimano FH M 475 and I'd just 'assumed' the front was also Shimano but I see now it's unbranded.

So, 1/4" it is then. Back to LBS tomorrow.
by Russell160
8 Aug 2018, 6:49pm
Forum: Bikes & Bits – Technical section
Topic: Shimano Front Hub Bearing Size Riddle
Replies: 2
Views: 264

Shimano Front Hub Bearing Size Riddle

Recently stripped a Shimano front hub with disk fixings off a mountain bike I'm refurbing. It's a Shimano 6061 double sealed alloy, quite a chunky thing.

The riddle is that there are 1/4" bearings fitted in the hub, 8 each side.
Normally as I understand it, front hubs are 3/16" bearing, 9 each side.

So my question is:

-is this correct, are some Shimano hubs fitted with 1/4" on the front?

-is it just an error, someone has fitted 1/4" in the past by mistake?

Thanks.
by Russell160
28 Sep 2017, 5:31pm
Forum: Bikes & Bits – Technical section
Topic: Quick advice for removing bottom bracket pls - [Sorted]
Replies: 54
Views: 4582

Re: Quick advice for removing bottom bracket pls

Any news? I have a similar problem...

Some thoughts:
-I see you are attempting it with the wheels still in the frame: this will tend to dissipate the force through the tyres etc. Try the bench vice/use frame as lever technique or at least remove wheels and sit the frame on the floor then stand on tools.
-there is merit I think in using lubes. Little and often, patience is the key. On advice I recently loosened some 100 plus year old brass/coppper taps just by drizzling some 3 in 1 oil every night and trying it every three days or so. The worst took about three weeks before it yielded. A light oil is key, molecule size and all that. YOu could get to the inside of the thread through the other side of course, or just running some down inside the seat post.
-bit of a long shot, but I had an Allez 2008 and it had external bearings: is it possible someone might have fitted a cartridge by mistake and mashed up the threads? I don't know enough about this aspect....It does seem a riddle that a recent bike should be so stubborn...
-AS others have said, a hot kettle poured all over the shell before going for the heave hoh does seem to help.
-Last resort, try LBS. As Brucey says it is a matter of death or glory/professional pride for a good mechanic to get BBs out.
by Russell160
5 Jul 2017, 1:45pm
Forum: Bikes & Bits – Technical section
Topic: Campagnolo lower jockey wheel sealed bearing puzzle
Replies: 7
Views: 815

Re: Campagnolo lower jockey wheel sealed bearing puzzle

Brucey - that's exactly what I've got. So it does appear those Record pulleys have been put into a Mirage mech. I'm setting it up with down tube shifters on a screw-on freewheel so haven't been unduly worried about the exact speed range.

Have just had a poke about at it and getting nowhere ...it does seem completely tightened, no doubt not assisted by my careless braying at it

I might run it by my LBS and if no joy just get replacements.

While I have the ear of you campag experts can I also ask: what is the 'correct' screw on freewheel brand for my campag screw on hub: sorry do't know the model. Harry Ingham's in Todmorden my LBS says campag didn't do a freewheel but mentioned it may be Regina originally? Also, any guidance on the 'best' number of gears - I am hoping for 7 if possible, but I hear also there can be a risk of the axle breaking?? I'm not going to be doing any heavy work on it so it's a risk I'm willing to take...

Also, what is the considered opinion on here re English freewheels on Italian threads?

Any tips on suppliers? Having had this headache with a used mech I might just bite the bullet and get something new/old stock for a freewheel? Or does anyone have anything for sale in their bottom drawer in good order....

Questions, questions....
by Russell160
5 Jul 2017, 10:48am
Forum: Bikes & Bits – Technical section
Topic: Campagnolo lower jockey wheel sealed bearing puzzle
Replies: 7
Views: 815

Campagnolo lower jockey wheel sealed bearing puzzle

Hello fellow cyclists,
Recently purchased a nice Campagnolo Mirage rear mech used for a steel frame build in the traditional style.

Campagnolo is new to me having been more of a Nissan man than an Alfa Romeo afficianado in the past. As my mid life crisis turns into a full time career I have decided to indulge myself.

The lower jockey wheel appears very stiff and in need of tlc. I note the upper jockey wheel is a normal bushing but the bottom one appears to be a 'sealed bearing' type arrangement.
The codes are:
2302012 Upper
2302013 Lower

..thus confirming a difference.
(8 spd I think).

Before realising the difference I confess I tried 'driving' out the inner ring of the bearing, believing it to be a bushing that had merely got clagged up with rust or whatever. I think I can safely say no lasting damage has been done. :oops: The wheel spins ok when not tightened but is very stiff when tightened up.

Can I do anything to restore or replace this sealed bearing? I have tried lubing it and it is now soaking in some oil as we speak. I am sceptical about the prospects as presumably 'sealed' means 'sealed'.

Obviously I am aware I can buy replacement parts but the price is crazy, more than the mech itself cost.

I have considered 'bodging' it with a shimano wheel or something but this is a bit of a vanity project to be honest and so I am trying to do it to an OCD/perfectionist standard. More time than money or sense. It will be a high days and holidays bike. Any help and guidance gratefully received.
by Russell160
9 Apr 2013, 10:10am
Forum: Bikes & Bits – Technical section
Topic: XT rear mech cable adjuster puzzle
Replies: 15
Views: 1076

Re: XT rear mech cable adjuster puzzle

Great thanks. How do you fit the in line cable adjusters: remove cable outer and cut it and refit? ie can I use the existing cable? And where should it be fitted: near the trigger or near the mech?
by Russell160
8 Apr 2013, 8:56pm
Forum: Bikes & Bits – Technical section
Topic: XT rear mech cable adjuster puzzle
Replies: 15
Views: 1076

XT rear mech cable adjuster puzzle

I currently have a Shimano Alivio rear mech on my hybrid. I saw a cheap used Deore XT rear mech for sale and bought it, to replace the Alivio which is quite sluggish/slow to change up compared to the XT I have on another MTB. ( I have fitted a new cable so I know it's not that).
However, I now realise the XT rear mech doesn't have a cable adjuster on the mech. New ones don't appear to have either:
http://www.wiggle.co.uk/shimano-xt-m771 ... ampaign=uk

On my MTB which has an XT mech I see the cable is adjusted at the handlebar changer. However, there is no apparent adjuster on the gear changer on this hybrid. So therefore it would appear I would have no way of making cable adjustment.

My questions are:
a)Is this omission of an adjuster a standard XT feature or is it just missing? If it is standard, any guesses as to why this is?? It seems really bizarre.
b)Am I basically stuffed in this situation and should not bother changing the mechs?
c)Is the only other option to upgrade the handlebar shifters (which I am reluctant to do) to ones with a cable adjuster?

(I see the LH shifters do have a cable adjustment at the trigger: presumably because there is no other adjuster for the front mech??)

Thanks in anticipation.
by Russell160
26 Mar 2013, 11:39am
Forum: Does anyone know … ?
Topic: Lidl (( 2 topics merged - by G ) now 3 merged - S)
Replies: 74
Views: 8557

Re: Lidl (( 2 topics merged - by G ) now 3 merged - S)

Re pump confusion Brucey, yes its a floor pump/track pump,not a foot pump my mistake.

RE pulling the valve off, yes it is a bit 'too' tight so care probably needed to avoid tearing valve.
by Russell160
23 Mar 2013, 5:16pm
Forum: Bikes & Bits – Technical section
Topic: advice for new bike up to £1000 for commute
Replies: 22
Views: 1611

Re: advice for new bike up to £1000 for commute

Hurrah!
Looks like Evans do a good test ride scheme:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qLrrR3HT ... t2ipLXRCXg

Not sure if you are male or female? If female worth looking at female specific designs which are not only the obvious differences in the saddle department but also things like brake reach and handlebar diameter, which I know my partner has found helpful.

Good luck, always a vicarious pleasure!
by Russell160
23 Mar 2013, 9:02am
Forum: Does anyone know … ?
Topic: Lidl (( 2 topics merged - by G ) now 3 merged - S)
Replies: 74
Views: 8557

Re: PLidl foot pump and grips review

As promised, review of the foot pump at £4.99

Positives
-metal barrel (leaflet says steel precision piston and barrel)
-nice positive action:wide handle with minimal flex and stable base.
-inflated hybrids easily up to 50. 60 psi.
-inflated road tyres easily up to 100 psi.
-nice 'long enough' pressure hose (64cm)
-dial appears accurate: clear gradual progression with each stroke
-good grip on the valve (Uses usual thumb lever arrangement)
-additional inserts for footballs, mattresses etc. and a nice touch: plastic container to keep these 'losable' bits with the pump. (Though this can get in the way when carrying etc.


Negatives
-slightly small dial, hard to read (but has red outer arrow dial which can be adjusted pre pump, as it were)
-main measure is bars, not psi.
-leaflet says 'nominal excess pressure' of 116 psi, I'm guesssing that's the max. The gauge is marked red from 116 psi. Dial goes up to 176.
States nominal pressure: 87 psi. NOt sure what this means. Middle of range?

Overall Verdict.
Absurdly good value at £4.95. Steel barrel gives positive action, confidently recommend for pressures up to c. 100 psi. MIght not be up to the job for more than 110 on a regular basis. I'm getting a second one to keep at work. Far superior to the Beto one I have at the moment which was £20. You've got to feel sorry for LBSs when its Lidl week.

Also mini review: Ergon style grips.
Not fitted, just fondled. Seems like very good quality basically copy of Ergon 4 grips but £30 or so less. Nice ergonomic grip, appears good finish, nice and light which is why I bought them to replace the gas pipe bar ends I've got at the moment. You can opt out of the bar ends and has a bar end plug option. Not suitable for carbon bars.
by Russell160
21 Mar 2013, 10:57pm
Forum: Does anyone know … ?
Topic: Lidl (( 2 topics merged - by G ) now 3 merged - S)
Replies: 74
Views: 8557

Lidl are at it again.

http://www.lidl.co.uk/cps/rde/www_lidl_ ... .htm?id=16

Will be grabbing a track pump tomorrow and will report back. Those grips look ok too.
by Russell160
20 Mar 2013, 8:07pm
Forum: Bikes & Bits – Technical section
Topic: Rigid fork swap advice please
Replies: 11
Views: 2332

Re: Rigid fork swap advice please

Interestign Andy. Do you run them with V or disc brakes?
Mine onlly have disc fittings but thinking of getting v brake brackets (like Pace made) added. I am reluctant to have discs front and v back as it just seems odd and I imagine having such a difference in braking power could be difficult to control.
Once you start changing one thing on a bike it has so many unforeseen consequences doesn't it?
by Russell160
20 Mar 2013, 11:10am
Forum: Bikes & Bits – Technical section
Topic: Rigid fork swap advice please
Replies: 11
Views: 2332

Re: Rigid fork swap advice please

Thank you all for your knowledgeable advice.

So the diagnosis is that its not just that the forks are alloy, it's mainly that they're too short and that's changed the geometry of the whole bike.

Thanks Brucey for the advice: I've moved the saddle back and fitted an adjustable stem, to raise the bars up and back a bit and this helps. The tingling has gone but I still feel a bit too far forward so a bit worried about long days in the saddle.

Thanks MacBludgeon for your tips and I got the tape measure out: A to C measurements are as follows:

Original Fork: 500mm, less sag 30mm?, average running lenght: 470mm.

Current Alloy Fork: 400

My Carbon Fork: 440

(Mt Tura Linked to : 430mm)

So, yes, I've taken 70 mm off the front end. So that's why my hands hurt.

The Van Nicholas forks were sold as Suspension Corrected but they're evidently a long way off. I've done some further digging on the Van Nicholas site and they appear to be a)Trekking forks and b)Fitted with Magura brakes with a brake booster which adds some rigiidity. ie so they're not a straight replacement for an MTB fork which is what they were sold as.
http://www.fatbirds.co.uk/5830/products ... -2013.aspx

(Please note I did not buy these from Fatbirds, it's just they'e got the pics on their site.)


I am still having brake judder and thanks Jezrant, have checked the headset etc and its ok. Have also tried fitting a V Brake Booster but with little effect.
I have come to the conclusion that its a combinatoin of a)me buying unwisely and b)being slightly missold. I have asked the retailers (On One) for a refund on the grounds of the brake judder and the flawed description and am waiting for reply.

My plan now, subject to your advice is:
*try the carbon fork for commuting purposes. This has an extra 40mm so should restore the geometry more or less.
*get a Mt Tura fork for if/when I go fully loaded touring.

Thanks for the offer T44, I have pMd you.
by Russell160
19 Mar 2013, 7:42pm
Forum: Bikes & Bits – Technical section
Topic: advice for new bike up to £1000 for commute
Replies: 22
Views: 1611

Re: advice for new bike up to £1000 for commute

Two thoughts:
-another little addition (for London) is security skewers for the wheels. Most bikes are fitted with quick release levers which makes them easy to steal and I know from my son's experience this is a constant headache in London. I'm sure the shop will explain.
-I would also suggest you try Edinburgh Bicycle Cooperative (are they in London??), see below for suggestions. Evans are good. The Boardman range at Halfords are good. Quick and lively and have all the fittings for mudguards and racks and within your range.
-Having done a bit of riding in LOndon traffic one of the key decisions for you to make is do you want straight handlebars which gives you more of an upright posture, helps you keep an eye on traffic or drop bars which put you lower down which can mean a bit of neck strain.
-I would also suggest a little mirror to fit on the handlebar.

Finally I would say two things:
*Get the best possible bike you can afford. A nice bike is a joy to ride which means you will use it more, whereas an average bike can be just a chore/means of transport.
*Choose the bike you fall in love with. If you have an emotional connection with a bike you'll use it more and hopefully get obsessed with cycling like all us saddos on here.

http://www.edinburghbicycle.com/product ... tirling-13
by Russell160
10 Mar 2013, 8:17am
Forum: Bikes & Bits – Technical section
Topic: Fitting mudguards to suspension corrected forks.
Replies: 12
Views: 1285

Re: Fitting mudguards to suspension corrected forks.

Re brake booster suggestion, how about this Magura one, with holes already:

http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Mode ... delID=9447

Personally I don't think anyone is going to top that 22t Chain ring. Genius.