Search found 17285 matches

by Vorpal
30 Jul 2021, 11:22am
Forum: Lands End to John O'Groats
Topic: Record attempt scheduled
Replies: 1001
Views: 70143

Re: Record attempt scheduled

Someone else has posted that she's 1 hour 30 minutes better than the previous record https://mobile.twitter.com/BethanNowell ... 8132245505

edited to add: I think that's tracker time, rather than official.
by Vorpal
30 Jul 2021, 11:18am
Forum: Lands End to John O'Groats
Topic: Record attempt scheduled
Replies: 1001
Views: 70143

Re: Record attempt scheduled

She has!

They posted on Facebook 3 minutes ago. No official time, yet, but I think she has broken the record by an hour or so.
by Vorpal
30 Jul 2021, 10:26am
Forum: The Tea Shop
Topic: Boris's Brain is missing
Replies: 887
Views: 22378

Re: Boris's Brain is missing

thirdcrank wrote: 29 Jul 2021, 4:58pm Thanks for those replies. It's all in line with what I've read from John Timpson over the last couple of decades and my only reservation about it is that there is a huge difference between what he says about his business in general and going into one of his shops (That's my general experience, nothing to do with the antecedents of the staff.)

If I've any doubts about the system, rather than JT's explanation, I'm not sure about training burglars to be locksmiths.
Who better? :lol: Various governments also hire hackers as security consultants.
by Vorpal
30 Jul 2021, 9:07am
Forum: Touring & Expedition
Topic: Extremely low gears
Replies: 63
Views: 1358

Re: Extremely low gears

For me, it varies. It varies with load on the bike, steepness of the hill, and things like whether I got enough sleep the night before, or it's getting near lunch time, or it's really hot out, or I want to stop and enjoy the view

I walked some parts of https://www.google.no/maps/dir/3580+Gei ... 126206!3e1 last year. The first section is gravel and a couple of bits would have been hard going on a MTB, let alone a loaded tourer. But I also wasn't touring fit, yet. 3 days later and I probably could have done all of it except the gravel section, without walking. I don't know if I would have. There is some beautiful scenery along there, and I stopped quite a lot to admire it, or walk a little off the road for a better view. I didn't always stop in places that were conducive to starting again.

Could I have ridden more of it with a lower gear? Probably. Is it worth changing my whole drive train to do so? Probably not.
by Vorpal
29 Jul 2021, 10:15am
Forum: The Tea Shop
Topic: Boris's Brain is missing
Replies: 887
Views: 22378

Re: Boris's Brain is missing

thirdcrank wrote: 29 Jul 2021, 10:10am Around here, the prominent unpaid work seems to be litter picking on roadside verges - something that would need hi-viz anyway. I'm at a bit of a loss to see how any private company would profit from something like this litter picking which otherwise wouldn't be done at all (I do know that failing Grayling privatised a lot of the Probation Service and that private companies sought to profit from that but it's not the same thing.)
It's hugely profitable in the US. Prison labour is a multi-billion dollar industry there https://businessreview.berkeley.edu/pro ... son-labor/

Perhaps this is the thin edge of a wedge designed to make money for Boris' cronies. Or perhaps it's just a bad idea or a distraction.
by Vorpal
29 Jul 2021, 10:09am
Forum: Touring & Expedition
Topic: Extremely low gears
Replies: 63
Views: 1358

Re: Extremely low gears

" or "
AliK wrote: 28 Jul 2021, 11:09pm Please can somebody clarify why balance may be a problem as presumably it isn't when these 50/52T are used on mountain bikes? or is it?

Or for that matter on a bike with a Rohloff hub (if I've understood various articles correctly)?

I would have thought balance would be easier based on the logic that at the moment if I go one or two gears up from my lowest gear it is then much harder to balance. ie my balance gets worse the higher the gear is. Or am I not understanding exactly what people are meaning by balance??
On a mountain bike, when you are only going at 2 or 3 mph, you generally only have yourself and the bike to balance. On a tourer, you also have to keep all your gear upright.

Anyway, the gearing systems tends to be set up a little differently. The lowest gear is generally around 19" or 20", about the same as on a tourer with low gearing.

I have about 21" as my lowest gear on my tourer. If I can't push me & my camping stuff up a hill, I just get off and walk. Living in Norway, as I do, there's a fair amount of that, and I don't worry about doing it. No matter how low the gearing, there will always be a hill to defeat it. :lol:
by Vorpal
29 Jul 2021, 9:52am
Forum: The Tea Shop
Topic: Boris's Brain is missing
Replies: 887
Views: 22378

Re: Boris's Brain is missing

thirdcrank wrote: 29 Jul 2021, 9:48am I think the likelihood that the general public will come to associate all hi-viz with "community" punishment is somewhere less than tiny.

Giving non-custodial sentences greater credibility is rather more demanding. Perhaps the government's motivation might be explored. I think this is rather like mental health care-in-the-community: the Victorian asylums = a bad thing and they were closed, without the necessary investment in the alternatives. Likewise, effective non-custodial sentences eg probation need serious money. I've no figures but I suspect that one of the hidden features of the various unpaid work schemes is non-completion. Only a hunch but I suspect that public humiliation may be quite a powerful motivation for not turning up. So, an anglicised version of Cool Hand Luke may impress some, but the likelihood of it working - in the sense of preventing recidivism - is not great.
The main benefit of unpaid work is to the firms who profit off of it.
by Vorpal
29 Jul 2021, 9:50am
Forum: The Tea Shop
Topic: I don't like living in England....
Replies: 1285
Views: 32123

Re: I don't like living in England....

The only people I know who have immigrated to the UK recently, went to London for university.
by Vorpal
29 Jul 2021, 9:02am
Forum: The Tea Shop
Topic: Space
Replies: 80
Views: 1376

Re: Space

Psamathe wrote: 28 Jul 2021, 1:09pm Whilst I'm strongly behind research into space, I don't see private tourism as a particularly useful means to achieve this. I see the change or clarification about getting astronaut "wings" as a good thing in that now the parasitic tax avoiders wont be getting their egos massaged by calling themselves "astronaut" at their tax-haven parties.

I've never understood why private is better/cheaper than Government run. Nothing wrong with sub-contracting aspects but wholesale provision of the entire service to a single company makes the "customer" vulnerable. Competition can be a pseudo-justification to quell objections - how has "competition" helped me get a better cheaper water provision? or how does having the choice between BT or BT for my landline/internet mean I get a better service?

I don't think private space tourism has any significant benefit.

Private investment isn't better or cheaper than government, and for some things, is worse.

However... the economic system, as it currently operates, is driven partly by competition. Rich people battling to get into space is a way to promote development of new technology & simplify space travel. It is arguably a less effective way, but the governments of the US and UK like it because it requires less direct investment on their part. It also does a good PR job for capitalism, individualism, and other values that are shared/promoted by both the Tories, and most US American leaders.

The biggest problem with it is of course that private companies will go to extreme lengths to protect their investments & intellectual property (IP), while governments have the ability, as NASA did for many years, to release IP for industrial use. It also doesn't fix any of the previously mentioned issues of exploitation, quality, lost tax, monopolies, etc.
by Vorpal
29 Jul 2021, 8:48am
Forum: The Tea Shop
Topic: I don't like living in England....
Replies: 1285
Views: 32123

Re: I don't like living in England....

Tangled Metal wrote: 28 Jul 2021, 6:55pm If look to national geographic. There's a few articles relating to research from IIRC 2019 about DNA testing of samples from around the Americas but the one I read was from research outlining migration into South America and in at least one case out of South America too. That followed it down to the Pacific Northwest then further South. Interesting summary.

The key dates they said was 25000 for I think the start, the 33000 site must be further north. However it was later at about 12000 to 9600 I think the most happened. Itis interesting because the migration into Central and South America split decisively in North America and there's genetic markers to indicate this in samples tested.
This article suggests that most Native Americans became genetically isolated about 23000 years ago, but there was some exchange in the Northwest, across the Bering straits, but that those populations were isolated from others in North America.

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science- ... 180973739/
by Vorpal
28 Jul 2021, 5:36pm
Forum: The Tea Shop
Topic: I don't like living in England....
Replies: 1285
Views: 32123

Re: I don't like living in England....

Tangled Metal wrote: 28 Jul 2021, 1:13pm From what I've read there's been repeated migration waves from about the time evidenced by the 33000 sites through to about 10000. I read the first migration based on DNA had a date of 25000, i.e. pre-Clovis. Then they split into two groups. Indeed later migration can't back northwards from central America into Southern USA. They're all pass into the Americas from Siberia though. A complex picture and one that's still only being seen from a very zoomed out perspective.
Where have you read this? Can you please provide links?
by Vorpal
28 Jul 2021, 5:26pm
Forum: Does anyone know … ?
Topic: Quads get tired too quickly...?
Replies: 49
Views: 1768

Re: Quads get tired too quickly...?

The first couple of those are subject to endless discussion on the forum, so welcome. :wink:

As for the other bits... position on the bike is critical. But it's impossible to correctly diagnose without pictures. Tired quads is *typically* a problem of a too low saddle, which is why people say that.

But really, I think that the best thing you could do is take a look at https://wheel-easy.org.uk/wp-content/up ... -2017a.pdf which is linked in 531colin's signature. He's helped many people with this sort of problem and designed touring bikes for Spa, so his advice is worth listening to.
by Vorpal
28 Jul 2021, 1:05pm
Forum: The Tea Shop
Topic: Space
Replies: 80
Views: 1376

Re: Space

Tangled Metal wrote: 28 Jul 2021, 12:58pm Oil palm tree plantations are an ecological disaster of their own. Monocultures like palm oil plantations are never good. If you're saying those plantations are a good alternative to rainforest i reckon you're not right. I'm sure Ben will know more.
No, I was definitely *not* suggesting that they are a good alternative. I was mainly responding to Ben saying that soil had poor nutrients & that farmers simply moved on, leaving waste. That happens in some places, but not all.
by Vorpal
28 Jul 2021, 12:58pm
Forum: The Tea Shop
Topic: I don't like living in England....
Replies: 1285
Views: 32123

Re: I don't like living in England....

Tangled Metal wrote: 28 Jul 2021, 12:49pm Aren't the current native Americans just the previous immigration to the Europeans who survived? There's been a few immigration waves and I can't recall the details but are there traces of the earlier migration waves? I know a lot died out but AIUI there's evidence of earlier cultures surviving into the earliest period of the current native American ancestors. Might be only partly correct and someone will know the details on here I'm sure.

Basically we're all just custodians of the land for those who come later! Ultimately ownership of land is temporary.
The Americas have been populated by humans for tens of thousands of years. The earliest evidence found thus far is, from, IIRC 35000 years or so ago.

People also crossed the Land Bridge during the last Ice Age, circa, 11000 years ago.

I'm not aware that there is evidence for multiple waves of immigration, prior to the 17th century. I'm not sure if there is evidence for anyone other than the Vikings, who were not successful in establishing themselves in what is now Canada.

Edited to add:
Humans settled in the Americas much earlier than previously thought, according to new finds from Mexico.

They suggest people were living there 33,000 years ago, twice the widely accepted age for the earliest settlement of the Americas.
https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-53486868

another article suggests 50000 years... https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2 ... 104010.htm
by Vorpal
28 Jul 2021, 12:47pm
Forum: Touring & Expedition
Topic: Europe July.????
Replies: 617
Views: 13973

Re: Europe July.????

They are immunised. It doesn't mean to make someone immune, but to bolster the immune system against a pathogen.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immunization

The word is more commonly used in other English speaking countries, and by translation than in the UK.

https://www.who.int/health-topics/vacci ... #tab=tab_1