bus exhaust

General cycling advice ( NOT technical ! )
mikeyg123
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bus exhaust

Postby mikeyg123 » 10 Aug 2018, 11:21am

Is there any reason why bus exhausts are low down near the ground?
If they were placed up high I might not have to inhale lungfuls of toxic gasses and particulates whenever I get stuck behind one.

brynpoeth
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Re: bus exhaust

Postby brynpoeth » 10 Aug 2018, 11:33am

Good question
Power stations have very high chimneys, the muck does come down but it is spread by the wind
Alternative facts welcome .. Cycling? Of course, but it is far better on a Gillott

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Mick F
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Re: bus exhaust

Postby Mick F » 10 Aug 2018, 1:39pm

Why aren't all vehicle exhausts high up?
Maybe something to do with safety.
Mick F. Cornwall

Vorpal
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Re: bus exhaust

Postby Vorpal » 10 Aug 2018, 1:42pm

The exhaust is low so the the particulates settle to the ground, rather than being breathed in, at least some of it settles out quickly.

In order to get emission high enough to be dispersed well, they would have to be too high for bridges, overhead signs, and that sort of thing.
“In some ways, it is easier to be a dissident, for then one is without responsibility.”
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brynpoeth
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Re: bus exhaust

Postby brynpoeth » 10 Aug 2018, 1:48pm

Railway steam locos puff steam and smoke up into the air, smells good :wink:
Alternative facts welcome .. Cycling? Of course, but it is far better on a Gillott

whoof
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Re: bus exhaust

Postby whoof » 10 Aug 2018, 1:56pm

The highway code says this.

"Buses, coaches and trams. Give priority to these vehicles when you can do so safely, especially when they signal to pull away from stops. Look out for people getting off a bus or tram and crossing the road."

However, it debatable to how safe it is to slow on a bicycle, let a bus out in front of you which then belches out exhaust fumes straight at you.

Xilter
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Re: bus exhaust

Postby Xilter » 10 Aug 2018, 6:16pm

+1
I took up cycling to work a two weeks ago. And probably every day one way or another I have asked myself

“ my Lord, HOW is this supposed to be a healthy alternative to driving? here I am huffing and puffing gasping for air and all my lungs are getting is diesel fumes. “

iandriver
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Re: bus exhaust

Postby iandriver » 10 Aug 2018, 6:36pm

Xilter wrote:+1
I took up cycling to work a two weeks ago. And probably every day one way or another I have asked myself

“ my Lord, HOW is this supposed to be a healthy alternative to driving? here I am huffing and puffing gasping for air and all my lungs are getting is diesel fumes. “


The fumes tend to congregate in cars via the vents. Some cars filter it well, but generally inside another metal box is the worst place to be. There are many sources on the theory, https://www.theguardian.com/environment ... tist-warns or https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/42001355/ ... -car.There are loads.
Supporter of the A10 corridor cycling campaign serving Royston to Cambridge http://a10corridorcycle.com. Never knew gardening secateurs were an essential part of the on bike tool kit until I took up campaigning.....

JohnW
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Re: bus exhaust

Postby JohnW » 10 Aug 2018, 8:01pm

I attend a local transport forum. I was genuinely surprised to find that particulate pollution from a double decker 'bus which complies fully with current legislation for 'buses is just a fraction of the average family car/transit type van, and particularly the big SUVs. If you look into the engine compartment of a 'bus you'll see less of an engine and more of a miniature chemical works, whose function is to eliminate pollution.

................and remember, one 'bus can hold more than 15 cars?

Don't worry about 'buses Mike - the problem is motorists.

AndyA
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Re: bus exhaust

Postby AndyA » 10 Aug 2018, 8:43pm

JohnW wrote:I attend a local transport forum. I was genuinely surprised to find that particulate pollution from a double decker 'bus which complies fully with current legislation for 'buses is just a fraction of the average family car/transit type van, and particularly the big SUVs. If you look into the engine compartment of a 'bus you'll see less of an engine and more of a miniature chemical works, whose function is to eliminate pollution.

................and remember, one 'bus can hold more than 15 cars?

Don't worry about 'buses Mike - the problem is motorists.


It's uncommon to see reek coming out a car exhaust, extremely common to see blackness belching out of a (First) bus. Methinks many buses aren't up to "current legislation", especially after a few years of use. That said, many of the Lothian Buses around here are hybrids - no reek and eerily quiet until the engine kicks in

JohnW
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Re: bus exhaust

Postby JohnW » 10 Aug 2018, 10:09pm

AndyA wrote:
JohnW wrote:I attend a local transport forum. I was genuinely surprised to find that particulate pollution from a double decker 'bus which complies fully with current legislation for 'buses is just a fraction of the average family car/transit type van, and particularly the big SUVs. If you look into the engine compartment of a 'bus you'll see less of an engine and more of a miniature chemical works, whose function is to eliminate pollution.

................and remember, one 'bus can hold more than 15 cars?

Don't worry about 'buses Mike - the problem is motorists.


It's uncommon to see reek coming out a car exhaust, extremely common to see blackness belching out of a (First) bus. Methinks many buses aren't up to "current legislation", especially after a few years of use. That said, many of the Lothian Buses around here are hybrids - no reek and eerily quiet until the engine kicks in


Living, as I do, in an area where FirstBus :evil: :evil: :evil: (known locally as Worstbus :lol: :lol: :lol: ) have a virtual monopoly of public transport I'm under no illusions about them to prejudice me in their favour, but I've only said it as I understand it. Maybe Yorkshire is different from Scotland (Yorkshire pudding being different from Haggis!) but there are plenty of climbs in these parts where bluesmoke issues from private vehicles by the ton.

To be fair, it's cleaner than 25 years ago, despite an increase in traffic. They should all be on bikes though.

peetee
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Re: bus exhaust

Postby peetee » 11 Aug 2018, 6:32am

JohnW wrote:I attend a local transport forum. I was genuinely surprised to find that particulate pollution from a double decker 'bus which complies fully with current legislation for 'buses is just a fraction of the average family car/transit type van, and particularly the big SUVs. If you look into the engine compartment of a 'bus you'll see less of an engine and more of a miniature chemical works, whose function is to eliminate pollution.


Thinking back to the Volkswagen emissions scandal and how it heralded a complete revolution in the diesel Vs petrol debate. I came out of that totally confused as to what all the figures were based on and how it was that fuel efficient engines could be more of a hazard. One minute the danger was gassess and the the next it's particulates which, unless I am mistaken is minute particles of solid matter. Please correct me if I am wrong and bear in mind that is that is the case then it only reinforces how missinformed the general public is as I am not a complete clot when it comes to internal combustion technology. My last 2 cars were healthy, standard spec VW Passats. The petrol did 30mpg, the diesel 60mpg. That's not statistics - that's my records. Am I to believe that, environmentally, the diesel was the wrong choice?
Last edited by peetee on 11 Aug 2018, 12:29pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Mick F
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Re: bus exhaust

Postby Mick F » 11 Aug 2018, 8:08am

Environmentally speaking, it depends on what you mean.

The "Environment" can refer to the whole planet, or just where you are.
The problem for people, is the air quality and that varies tremendously.
Here at home in the garden, the air is wonderful, but a mile away in the village, it's a completely different story as Gunnislake is one of the most polluted villages in the country due to the main road on a steep hill in a valley combined with traffic lights and people gunning their engines to pull away.

Read my long thread.
viewtopic.php?f=6&t=110358
Mick F. Cornwall

JohnW
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Re: bus exhaust

Postby JohnW » 11 Aug 2018, 11:53am

peetee wrote:................Am I to believe that, environmentally, the diesel was the wrong choice?

Well, it was thatcher that made the choice, so it's my belief and submission that health and environmental benefits were not the driving force.

If the environment, health, clean sweet and pleasant surroundings and lives were a priority then public transport, cycling, walking would be priorities - but they're not.

Marcus Aurelius
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Re: bus exhaust

Postby Marcus Aurelius » 11 Aug 2018, 8:04pm

It’s to try and ensure the particulates are blasted towards the road, and not people’s lungs. The new hybrid electric busses don’t really emit like the old smelly smokey busses did though.