Brands

General cycling advice ( NOT technical ! )
Englishhammer
Posts: 6
Joined: 17 Sep 2021, 6:01pm

Brands

Post by Englishhammer »

Complete newbie here. After the cardiologists suggestion I’m toying between road/mountain biking. To keep my question short but sweet, how far does the brand go in what I purchase?
For example, I’d rather spend more on a decent make than a pot luck in Halfords. The problem is that aside from price, I have nothing to go on. I suppose the ideal scenario would be 2 lists, one consisting of decent road bikes and another of mountain bike brands.

Lets pretend money isn’t a stumbling block too. Also…is my opinion that road cycling would be better for the heart to build up endurance or would mountain biking do the same?
Godzy89
Posts: 46
Joined: 10 Apr 2021, 3:00pm

Re: Brands

Post by Godzy89 »

Take a look at a flat bar hybrid or maybe a gravel bike and that way you will have the best of both worlds
Both offer the option of on road and off road
A true mtb will come with knobbly tyres which will be harder work on the road and a true road bike is unsuitable for off road
Spend wise decide on a budget and go from there
Im sure a lot more knowledgeable people on here will give a better answer than i have
I recently bought a flat bar hybrid (Pinnacle Neon 2) from Evans and am more than happy with it
Cost me £775.00
User avatar
531colin
Posts: 14026
Joined: 4 Dec 2009, 6:56pm
Location: North Yorkshire

Re: Brands

Post by 531colin »

"Better" would be which ever you will stick at, when its cold, wet and gets dark early.
A hybrid/gravel bike will allow you to do both roads and local tracks.....or even a desperately unfashionable touring bike.

.....touche, Godzy!
thirdcrank
Posts: 32901
Joined: 9 Jan 2007, 2:44pm

Re: Brands

Post by thirdcrank »

If you are new to cycling, one of the main things to help you cope will be low gears. Lots of speeds does not necessarily = low gears. To put it at it's very simplest, a bike with drop handlebars is unlikely to have really low gears and a bike with flat handlebars generally will but it's not guaranteed.
Godzy89
Posts: 46
Joined: 10 Apr 2021, 3:00pm

Re: Brands

Post by Godzy89 »

531colin wrote: 17 Sep 2021, 8:16pm "Better" would be which ever you will stick at, when its cold, wet and gets dark early.
A hybrid/gravel bike will allow you to do both roads and local tracks.....or even a desperately unfashionable touring bike.

.....touche, Godzy!
👍👍😊😊
Jamesh
Posts: 2320
Joined: 2 Jan 2017, 5:56pm

Re: Brands

Post by Jamesh »

I'd second a gravel cx bike it's the only bike I can do everything one.

Brands such as boardman, Ribble, canyon, Merlin are all good value.

An alloy frame / carbon forks with claris / sora / tiagra groupset and disc brakes. Approx price £750++

Cheers James
Tangled Metal
Posts: 8223
Joined: 13 Feb 2015, 8:32pm

Re: Brands

Post by Tangled Metal »

Road bike, you can always take it off road if you know what you're doing!

https://youtu.be/5z1fSpZNXhU

Seriously I was looking for something of a do it all bike after my new mountain bike style hybrid got nicked. Really didn't like flat bars having ridden almost all my life on drop bars. Back then the specialised brand did a cyclo-cross bike that was more of a leisure bike than a true cx bike. It was what all the bike shops recommended. It was about when adventure bikes were starting to be a thing. About them a guy cycled the world on the newly released croix de fer.

Not having much i bought an planet x London road. They were selling it as a do anything bike, kind of whats now called a gravel bike. Later on they sold it as an urban bike whatever that is.

I use it mostly on the road but I've ridden it offload a bit too. I've done mountain bike trails on 32mm slick tyres before now but usually put my 38mm marathon pluses on for offroad. It's fun slipping sideways on a muddy slope on 32mm slicks, but controlling the bike all the same.

After I got this bike the gravel bike got fully developed and given that name. Now they're simply a tough bike you can fit out for road or off road or hybrid use. Get one capable of up to 50mm tyres and you can fit quite wide nobbly 700c tyres or slightly narrower more slick ones for when you're only doing the roads. You can also get ones capable of even wider in n650b wheels. Smaller wheels that are between the old 26"mtb and the 700 roadwheel. There's a whole range of mountain bikes in that tyre size so if b your rims can take wide it's a option with some gravel bikes.

My personal choice would be either a tour de fer or a croix de fer from genesis. I've wanted one for years. However kona look to be doing some similar touring gravel bikes. Not sure that's a thing but that's what I call those rugged, offroad capable bikes that have all the brackets and fixing points for every kind of touring and bike packing kit. The kona ones have several fork bolts to take those bikepacking luggage cages or front rack. Plus rear rack bolts, three bottle bosses, etc.

It's an exciting time for road style off road capable bikes.
DevonDamo
Posts: 690
Joined: 24 May 2011, 1:42am

Re: Brands

Post by DevonDamo »

Before we discuss, perhaps it would make sense to ask the OP one question, like whether they've got any idea of the type of riding they'd be interested in - e.g. on-road, on-gravel, on trails, and what sort of roads/terrain they're likely to be on in their local area.

Oldjohnw
Posts: 7721
Joined: 16 Oct 2018, 4:23am
Location: South Warwickshire

Re: Brands

Post by Oldjohnw »

My first thought is: what would nearby rides involve? Can you ride from your front door?

If getting to the start from home is too complex you may set yourself up to fail. Of course, if a ride does require some other transportation at the start there is another discussion.
John
mattsccm
Posts: 4066
Joined: 28 Nov 2009, 9:44pm

Re: Brands

Post by mattsccm »

First pick your style of bike. Of course that may be tricky but will depend on what is outside the door I would think.
Second consider a compromise. Modern so called "gravel " bikes work nicely on the road with lighter tyres or nicely off road with knobblier tyres. You adjust the bike to suit :D A gravel bike with flat bars will be called a hybrid and vice versa . And you'll have a million variations here.
Third. The more you pay the higher spec you get. Just like everything else. Thing is, do you need the higher spec and is it actually better for YOU? Some of us want super light and stuff the longevity. Some want it to last for ever and care nowt for weight.
Fourth. Road or off road can be equally good for fitness. It's how hard you ride that matters.
Finally. The universal questions about string length is more specific than the one you have asked :D .Just too big to answer I suppose. Try to have a look at what people are riding near you. Talk to people in cafes. Join Facebook groups etc. Just keep at it.
Jdsk
Posts: 11174
Joined: 5 Mar 2019, 5:42pm

Re: Brands

Post by Jdsk »

Englishhammer wrote: 17 Sep 2021, 6:08pmAlso…is my opinion that road cycling would be better for the heart to build up endurance or would mountain biking do the same?
Welcome.

What advice on exercise have you been given by your healthcare professionals?

The most important factor in choice of exercise is what will encourage you to keep it up. Try them both, see what you enjoy and what you don't.

Road cycling is an excellent low-impact way of improving cardiovascular fitness.

Jonathan
Englishhammer
Posts: 6
Joined: 17 Sep 2021, 6:01pm

Re: Brands

Post by Englishhammer »

DevonDamo wrote: 17 Sep 2021, 10:30pm Before we discuss, perhaps it would make sense to ask the OP one question, like whether they've got any idea of the type of riding they'd be interested in - e.g. on-road, on-gravel, on trails, and what sort of roads/terrain they're likely to be on in their local area.

Amazing answers so far, thanks. To answer this it doesn’t help I’m also a bit indecisive. Cornwall isn’t flat and so I believe the road cycling would be hard although it is the one I’m slightly more drawn to. Also living where I am, the town itself is built for cyclists but outside of town not so great. Hills galore.
Probably to make my decision easier is the fact I live close to 3 gardens/forests etc that have official mountain bike trails.

To give some more context. It would get daily use on short road journeys to work, but if it was also capable I’d definitely try it out at the local trails too.
Last edited by Englishhammer on 18 Sep 2021, 8:52am, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
TimeTraveller
Posts: 129
Joined: 7 Mar 2019, 8:49pm

Re: Brands

Post by TimeTraveller »

Get a bicycle (hybrid NON electric ) flat bars can help loads with getting a comfey ride sorted...
Begin slowly but begin, dont set targets too soon just get out and enjoy that riding...

Things I found uselful

Persistence (stay with it even when your unhappy with your progress)
Tenacity ( begining can be easy but often is not, again stay with it)

Learn about the bike and all its doings with regards to repair at home and while out, this saves some of the hassles that can put you off and gives you confidence to go a bit further without worry.

Ride often but dont push too hard to begin with !
The rest will come with time.
Rough Stuff rider since 1979
Englishhammer
Posts: 6
Joined: 17 Sep 2021, 6:01pm

Re: Brands

Post by Englishhammer »

Jdsk wrote: 18 Sep 2021, 8:15am
Englishhammer wrote: 17 Sep 2021, 6:08pmAlso…is my opinion that road cycling would be better for the heart to build up endurance or would mountain biking do the same?
What advice on exercise have you been given by your healthcare professionals?
Basically I’m limited in what I can do, but he wants me to push to the boundaries of what I can do. After 18 months of being told not to do more than a brisk walk (I’m only 38) I need to
A) build up the fitness
B) find my limitations and stick to it, don’t overload myself

So I’ll never be doing 30mile rides :lol:
Post Reply