How the spirit of cycling has changed

General cycling advice ( NOT technical ! )
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mjr
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Re: How the spirit of cycling has changed

Postby mjr » 15 Apr 2016, 11:51am

Sweep wrote:I used to lead lots of rides. One chap, not exactly a mamil but with poseur tendencies came along without water. Can't remember why but it was either because it would spoil the lines of the bike or involve the carrying of surplus weight. Begged me for water half way through the ride. Reader, I refused.

Well, I think that's a bit mean. I guide rides (rather than lead), but I have altered routes to call at a lottery shop or service station when it becomes clear that several of the group were low on water because it had been much warmer than forecast. It's probably not good if a rider suffers from dehydration on a group ride because you wouldn't help.

I've also been given water by another rider, but that was mainly because it was cooler than forecast and they didn't need it, so it saved the group time waiting for me to get a refill from the cafe stop and saved them carrying it home. Give and take... give and take...
MJR, mostly pedalling 3-speed roadsters. KL+West Norfolk BUG incl social easy rides http://www.klwnbug.co.uk
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ericonabike
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Re: How the spirit of cycling has changed

Postby ericonabike » 15 Apr 2016, 1:01pm

I recently gave up my part time job as a chauffeur, ferrying directors and senior managers of various organisations around the country. It surprised me at first how often they would turn out to be into cycling. But all too often I felt no real connection with them as fellow cyclists. They always made a point of stressing the cost of their machines, rarely showed any interest in what I had to say, and instead explained in some detail how they were increasing their average speed. For them, cycling really is the new golf!
Motorists' mantra: Cyclists must obey the law and the Highway Code AT ALL TIMES. Unless their doing so would HOLD ME UP.

scottg
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Re: How the spirit of cycling has changed

Postby scottg » 15 Apr 2016, 2:41pm

In a similar vein to many comments here, it surprising the number of so called serious cyclists
who buy their wheels pre-built, not to mention riding clinchers, the horror.

Off to shellac my wooden rims and put some oil in the Sturmey K hub.
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Bicycler
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Re: How the spirit of cycling has changed

Postby Bicycler » 15 Apr 2016, 3:33pm

I don't think many posters have engaged in that kind of reactionary criticism of anything modern. People haven't been objecting to those with modern gear. I bet the vast majority of us have lots of cycle stuff. The objections to the way some people treat flashy gear as a form of status symbol or those occasions where flashy gear and racer image lead to people coming unstuck at the first hint of trouble ("all the gear and no idea").

Regarding ill manners and not acknowledging others, it's a wider social trend. Like Crocodile Dundee I was brought up to say hello when passing people on paths. At one time a reply was almost guaranteed. Now some people are even surprised when you do greet them. A young cyclist will see no more reason to greet a stranger on a bike than than a fellow walker on a path. The very notion probably seems strange to many. It would be a mistake for us to take it personally.

reohn2
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Re: How the spirit of cycling has changed

Postby reohn2 » 15 Apr 2016, 3:37pm

scottg wrote:In a similar vein to many comments here, it surprising the number of so called serious cyclists
who buy their wheels pre-built, not to mention riding clinchers, the horror.

Off to shellac my wooden rims and put some oil in the Sturmey K hub.


What a breath of fresh air to read a post from a real serious cyclist! :wink:
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morzov
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Re: How the spirit of cycling has changed

Postby morzov » 15 Apr 2016, 4:21pm

It looks as if the author isn't even a cyclist - he seems to be into running

https://tommarriage.wordpress.com/about/

What he says is nothing new either. Yes there are lots of new cyclists with all the gear and I suppose that is where this term "cycling is the new golf" comes from. I'm not sure if that's accurate but what is true is that in golf many of those people faded away when something else took their attention. I've no doubt that will happen to many of the new breed and those who remain will probably turn out to be OK.

Incidentally we used to call the equivalent of MAMILS LOMBARDS! Lots of money but a real........

reohn2
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Re: How the spirit of cycling has changed

Postby reohn2 » 15 Apr 2016, 4:55pm

morzov wrote:...... Yes there are lots of new cyclists with all the gear and I suppose that is where this term "cycling is the new golf" comes from........


I've always thought cycling being regarded as the new golf because business could be done in group rides and at cafe stops,rather than on the golf course and in the club house over a G&T or a pint.
I've always thought cycling as an escape from work/business*,a feeding of the spirit in the environment of nature and exercise,a meditation of rhythmic beauty where the inner being soars and where no one else is needed to chatter to about anything,least of all work/business.
To me using cycling as a bye product to further my career or business would be to <i>[derogatory word removed]</i> it in some way.


*I ran my own business for 25+years and never sought cycling as a way to promote my business,that's not to say business didn't come my way as a result of cycling but it was never sought by me.
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nirakaro
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Re: How the spirit of cycling has changed

Postby nirakaro » 15 Apr 2016, 5:08pm

I think the biggest common factor between cycling and golf, is that when you’re not as good as you’d like to be, it’s proverbially easy to blame your equipment, and repeatedly spend a lot of money in the hope of improvement...

reohn2
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Re: How the spirit of cycling has changed

Postby reohn2 » 15 Apr 2016, 5:25pm

nirakaro wrote:I think the biggest common factor between cycling and golf, is that when you’re not as good as you’d like to be, it’s proverbially easy to blame your equipment, and repeatedly spend a lot of money in the hope of improvement...

How right! :lol: :lol: :lol:
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deliquium
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Re: How the spirit of cycling has changed

Postby deliquium » 15 Apr 2016, 5:32pm

nirakaro wrote:I think the biggest common factor between cycling and golf, is that when you’re not as good as you’d like to be, it’s proverbially easy to blame your equipment, and repeatedly spend a lot of money in the hope of improvement...


No to mention darts or even sex.
Current pedalable joys

"you would be surprised at the number of people in these parts who nearly are half people and half bicycles"

reohn2
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Re: How the spirit of cycling has changed

Postby reohn2 » 15 Apr 2016, 7:47pm

deliquium wrote:Not to mention darts or even sex.


Did someone mention something?
Psst,I don't think anyone noticed
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drossall
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Re: How the spirit of cycling has changed

Postby drossall » 15 Apr 2016, 8:18pm

I sympathised with the Guardian article in some ways.

It's great to see such take-up of cycling. When I started, we were all weirdos, and riding twenty miles was strictly for Superman. Even now, not everyone wants to do it, but many offices must have a number of people who do.

On the other hand, to read The Comic, you'd think that you need a six-month training programme, a coach, a diet and a bike fit to consider riding five miles to work.

But, presumably, people are ignoring all that, because commuters in London come in all shapes and sizes, and all types of bike.

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Sweep
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Re: How the spirit of cycling has changed

Postby Sweep » 15 Apr 2016, 10:40pm

mjr wrote:Well, I think that's a bit mean. I guide rides (rather than lead), but I have altered routes to call at a lottery shop or service station when it becomes clear that several of the group were low on water because it had been much warmer than forecast. It's probably not good if a rider suffers from dehydration on a group ride because you wouldn't help.

I've also been given water by another rider, but that was mainly because it was cooler than forecast and they didn't need it, so it saved the group time waiting for me to get a refill from the cafe stop and saved them carrying it home. Give and take... give and take...

I think you are rather missing the point that this person,an experienced rider, deliberately came out without water. They didn't forget. A change in weather/climactic conditions was not involved. There was no chance of serious consequences - we were in the home counties, barely beyond london, not in the sahara. Several folk i know said they would have done the same because of the background. It was laughed about at the time and since. Water was given by someone else in the group. No mamils were harmed in the production, though one may have learned a useful lesson. Guide on, o good shepherd.
Sweep

Geoff.D
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Re: How the spirit of cycling has changed

Postby Geoff.D » 16 Apr 2016, 10:55am

deliquium wrote:
nirakaro wrote:I think the biggest common factor between cycling and golf, is that when you’re not as good as you’d like to be, it’s proverbially easy to blame your equipment, and repeatedly spend a lot of money in the hope of improvement...


No to mention darts or even sex.


I'm no nearer a double top or a bullseye, despite being a lot poorer.
Perhaps I'll turn my attention to darts.

reohn2
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Re: How the spirit of cycling has changed

Postby reohn2 » 16 Apr 2016, 11:02am

Geoff.D wrote:I'm no nearer a double top or a bullseye, despite being a lot poorer.
Perhaps I'll turn my attention to darts.


Don't point that thing at anyone,particularly if you've got three of them :shock: :shock: :shock:
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