How the spirit of cycling has changed

General cycling advice ( NOT technical ! )
Samuel D
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Re: How the spirit of cycling has changed

Postby Samuel D » 17 Apr 2016, 12:56pm

reohn2 wrote:
Samuel D wrote:Chiefly, not on a bike!


Why's that then? :?

I’m only joking – hey, some of my best friends wear sunglasses! – but the idea that it’s necessary to have £100 ‘eyewear’ to go for a ride is one way the “spirit of cycling” has changed. But what if a bee hit my eye going downhill?!

There was a distinct lack of ‘eyewear’ even among pro racers in the past:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7hnLjiTzejo
(Eddy Merckx documentary, Tête de la Course)

reohn2
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Re: How the spirit of cycling has changed

Postby reohn2 » 17 Apr 2016, 1:12pm

DaveP wrote:The quality of an activity doesn't seem to be as important as it's ability to yield numbers, which can then be tabulated and talked about ad nauseam. Produce some sort of score and you've been doing significant and manly stuff. OTH no score - you've been playing. Frittering your time away. Unreasonable to expect proper adults to take an interest.

Personally I have no objection whatever to cyclists in training taking a detailed interest in their own performance or discussing it with like minded souls. Strava seems to be ideal for the purpose. I just think it's sad that so many seem unable to see any other form of satisfaction to be had from their wheels - "Go for a ride and Not try for a personal best - You kidding me?"

I think that's right in part for some people,I'd suggest it's a carry over from the work ethic/results that could be at the heart of it.

I used the term "manly" on purpose. I suspect that women may well have different views. I would be more than happy to read them...

Going off the increasing number of fit(in the athletic sense)women I see riding quality sportive type bikes at respectable rates,and the same goes when I'm riding the trails on quality MTB bikes(damn them all coz they're faster than me!),I'd say you're off target with that remark.
These,mostly young,though not exclusively,women appear to be upwardly mobile go getters,so to speak,and personally I find it heartening to see more people riding,especially women,which it must also be for women who've ridden for decades through the male dominated era that cycling was and to a lesser extent it is these days.

IMO the older generation,and I count myself in that sector,have to accept and embrace the changes cycling has seen and will continue to see,yes there'll be Stravaites,no mudguards,number oriented riders,along with the grizzled old pharts,those queer folks who ride those lying down bikes,and those riding bikes with one or more too many wheels,and those with more than one person on board(pedalling or not :? ),or heaven forbid recumbent tricycle tandems,but unfortunately it's all cycling :shock: .

Seriously though what causes me dismay in regard to certain sectors of the cycling public by other sectors is such terms as, "Ah,but they're not proper cyclists" :? .Or as I read in the last issue of the Rough Stuff Fellowship,usually an all embracing club if ever there was one,was an article pointing a gnarly old finger at the 'MAMIL' with disdain,going in great detail of how it had all become how much their bike's worth and what labels were displayed :?
Whether in jest or not,and I'm still not sure which,it does cycling no good but proves,to me at least,why cycle campaigning as a whole is so in effective at bringing change for the better on our roads,as we(cyclists) cant even decide what 'proper' cycling is! :?
Cycling's in danger of becoming(if it's not already) like religious denominations(within any given religion),claiming to be the only true way,due to whatever set of rules and rites set out in it's particular cannon.
Cannons,if not treated with respect,can do a lot of damage to the people firing them if not loaded right with the resultant explosion leave the target unharmed.
My 2d's worth FWIW :)
Last edited by reohn2 on 17 Apr 2016, 2:02pm, edited 2 times in total.
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reohn2
Posts: 40130
Joined: 26 Jun 2009, 8:21pm

Re: How the spirit of cycling has changed

Postby reohn2 » 17 Apr 2016, 1:14pm

Samuel D wrote:
reohn2 wrote:
Samuel D wrote:Chiefly, not on a bike!


Why's that then? :?

I’m only joking – hey, some of my best friends wear sunglasses! – but the idea that it’s necessary to have £100 ‘eyewear’ to go for a ride is one way the “spirit of cycling” has changed. But what if a bee hit my eye going downhill?!

There was a distinct lack of ‘eyewear’ even among pro racers in the past:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7hnLjiTzejo
(Eddy Merckx documentary, Tête de la Course)


Some folks find it necessary to go to Lidl in a Range Rover behemoth complete with vanity plates,such is life,unfortunately :wink:
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reohn2
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Joined: 26 Jun 2009, 8:21pm

Re: How the spirit of cycling has changed

Postby reohn2 » 17 Apr 2016, 1:16pm

horizon wrote:
Vantage wrote:Wot he said^^^

My prescription glasses are those reactolight things and go almost black in bright sunshine. Sunglasses in that respect can't be helped :?


Don't worry Vantage, it's not the sunglasses per se, it's what comes with them . . .


Usually an 'anti static' cleaning cloth :D
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lingy
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Re: How the spirit of cycling has changed

Postby lingy » 17 Apr 2016, 1:48pm

All interesting stuff. I've been watching the rise of non-traditional cycling clubs and have heard the opinion that they are catering for people with less free time. For people working long hours, more weekends and not feeling they have enough time for an all-day meander, these new clubs offering fastish rides give people concentrated cycling exercise. I remain firmly of the view that we should support cycling in all its forms and not be judgemental of folk who don't do it the way we do it. Interestingly, in terms of friendly nods, my son (loves fast cycling with Strava!...also a CTC/CUK member) says that touring cyclists can sometimes be less than friendly to him.


I'm a trendy consumer. Just look at my wobbly bog brush using hovercraft full of eels

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horizon
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Re: How the spirit of cycling has changed

Postby horizon » 17 Apr 2016, 2:11pm

lingy wrote: my son (loves fast cycling with Strava!...also a CTC/CUK member) says that touring cyclists can sometimes be less than friendly to him.



The question is, how did he know they were touring cyclists? Were they on tour? Did they have panniers? Or were they just having a Sunday ride? So he's obviously aware that there are different types of cyclists.

I think it's worth noting that sophisticated marketing isn't interested one jot in whether two people ride bikes as their common denominator. What they want to know is, what are their core values? In which case you sell to those values and, with a bit of luck, offer all the other (even non-cycling) products associated with those values. So if one cyclist is an ambitious go-getter, on the look out for a promotion at work, he'll get the branding, gadgets and gels that allow for competitive differentiation. For the bearded no-hoper there will be free membership of English Heritage as a bonus offer.

It's these much more deeply held values that get exhibited (very publicly) every Sunday - no wonder the writer got upset about it all. Cycling is hardly immune from this and indeed offers a multitude of opportunities to express your beliefs (even if you would rather it didn't).
When the pestilence strikes from the East, go far and breathe the cold air deeply. Ignore the sage, stay not indoors. Ho Ri Zon 12th Century Chinese philosopher