Croggy - a new one on me.

General cycling advice ( NOT technical ! )
PJ520
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Croggy - a new one on me.

Postby PJ520 » 18 Oct 2017, 2:29pm

According to The Virtual Linguist the OED now defines croggy as “a ride given to a passenger on a bicycle, in which the recipient sits on the crossbar, handlebars, or behind the person pedalling”.

Has this been introduced to UK English since the 1970s because I've never heard of it. How do you use it in a sentence? When I was a kid at primary school I saddled a schoolmate home sometimes.
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NUKe
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Re: Croggy - a new one on me.

Postby NUKe » 18 Oct 2017, 2:38pm

I have heard and used it in the 1970's in west Yorkshire.
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PJ520
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Re: Croggy - a new one on me.

Postby PJ520 » 18 Oct 2017, 2:44pm

NUKe wrote:I have heard and used it in the 1970's in west Yorkshire.

Ah well...it wasn't too far from Lancashire where I grew up, perhaps we were contaminated.
You only live once, which is enough if you do it right. - Mae West

John_S
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Re: Croggy - a new one on me.

Postby John_S » 18 Oct 2017, 2:51pm

Where I grew up it was called a seatie but when I was at uni the discussion came up of what various people called this and someone did say croggy and another said a backie.

eileithyia
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Re: Croggy - a new one on me.

Postby eileithyia » 18 Oct 2017, 5:01pm

Always known it as a 'croggy' as in 'give us a croggy' Or 'can give you a croggy'
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keyboardmonkey
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Re: Croggy - a new one on me.

Postby keyboardmonkey » 18 Oct 2017, 5:38pm

PJ520 wrote:According to The Virtual Linguist the OED now defines croggy as “a ride given to a passenger on a bicycle, in which the recipient sits on the crossbar, handlebars, or behind the person pedalling”.

Has this been introduced to UK English since the 1970s because I've never heard of it. How do you use it in a sentence? When I was a kid at primary school I saddled a schoolmate home sometimes.


It's a term used in East Yorkshire from at least the 70s. I still hear it. I don't thing there is any danger that it will be replaced by 'toptubey' [sp?].

"Any chance of a croggy home from school?" might be an example of its usage.

keyboardmonkey
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Re: Croggy - a new one on me.

Postby keyboardmonkey » 18 Oct 2017, 5:46pm

eileithyia wrote:Always known it as a 'croggy' as in 'give us a croggy'...


Yes, and for those from a sheltered linguistic upbringing: the person asking the question was not enquiring on behalf of a group of people, but typically just for their own benefit. :)

thirdcrank
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Re: Croggy - a new one on me.

Postby thirdcrank » 18 Oct 2017, 6:02pm

It was in general use around here for giving somebody a ride on the top tube in my teens. I've always assumed it was a corruption of cross bar. IME, it never extended to a ride on the saddle, which would have been described as a "saddle."

(Ken Dodd had a salty joke about getting into trouble with the police for giving a young lady a ride on the cross bar, the punch line being "It was her bike."

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ferrit worrier
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Re: Croggy - a new one on me.

Postby ferrit worrier » 18 Oct 2017, 6:38pm

Just to throw the cat amongst the pigeons, when a were a lad we used to call it a "crossy" for a ride on the cross bar.
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PJ520
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Re: Croggy - a new one on me.

Postby PJ520 » 18 Oct 2017, 6:41pm

Seems I had a sheltered up bringing in our woolen enclave of W Yorks, perhaps I didn't go out and laik enough.
You only live once, which is enough if you do it right. - Mae West

Grarea
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Re: Croggy - a new one on me.

Postby Grarea » 18 Oct 2017, 7:03pm

We used to call it a whippy.

As in 'give us a whippy'.
Although, I am slightly unsure of the spelling as I have not seen it written down.
Thinking about it, not sure if it meant ' a lift on the bike' or more specifically sitting on the saddle while the rider stood up and pedalled.

keyboardmonkey
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Re: Croggy - a new one on me.

Postby keyboardmonkey » 18 Oct 2017, 7:16pm

thirdcrank wrote:IME, it never extended to a ride on the saddle, which would have been described as a "saddle."


Round these parts that would have been called a "seater". (As an aside, when I Googled it in an expression "seater" was autocorrected to "sweater", which in turn I would call a "jumper".)

Anyway... I remember giving rides on the metal saddlebag support that clamped to the top of my seat stays. That practice - and having someone sitting on the handlebars - had no designated term that I recall.

gloomyandy
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Re: Croggy - a new one on me.

Postby gloomyandy » 18 Oct 2017, 8:06pm

I grew up in the E Mids (Notts/Derby border), in the 60s/70s it was always a croggy there! Ay'Up mate gis a croggy! Now living in W. Yorks and a mention of this to my cycling friends resulted in blank expressions!

LollyKat
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Re: Croggy - a new one on me.

Postby LollyKat » 18 Oct 2017, 9:34pm

In my part of the world it's always a "backie" - I've never heard any of the other expressions.

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TrevA
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Re: Croggy - a new one on me.

Postby TrevA » 18 Oct 2017, 9:43pm

Yep, grew up in Notts in the 60's and 70's and Croggy was a commonly heard term. Everyone knew what it meant.
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