Ryanair bike policy

General cycling advice ( NOT technical ! )
Rob_Judge
Posts: 2
Joined: 11 Apr 2018, 1:29pm

Re: Ryanair bike policy

Postby Rob_Judge » 13 Apr 2018, 12:18am

Thanks to everyone for their suggestions. Part of the issue is that I've been offered a Thule bike box https://www.thule.com/en-gb/gb/bike-accessories/bike-travel-cases/thule-roundtrip-transition-_-1683469 which is very nice but quite a beast weighing in at 17.6kg. Add a 9kg bike and we're not quite at the 30kg I mentioned but certainly over the 20kg limit. I'm beginning to think I might take my saddle and pedals and hire just in case Ryanair decide to sting me. Next time it will be EasyJet both ways!

Graham O
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Joined: 27 Jan 2007, 7:54am

Re: Ryanair bike policy

Postby Graham O » 13 Apr 2018, 3:03am

From Ryanairs T's and C's:
"Sporting or musical equipment including but not limited to large fishing rods, golf clubs, bikes* (bikes have a weight limit of 30 kilos), scooters, fencing equipment, pole vaults, javelin, surfboards, bodyboards, snowboards and skis and large musical instruments including but not limited to harps, double bass and drums are inherently unsuitable for carriage by airlines operating fast turnarounds such as Ryanair. However, these items may be carried in the hold of the aircraft in addition to your personal checked baggage allowance up to a limit of 20 kilos per item. Fees apply, click here for details."

https://www.ryanair.com/gb/en/useful-in ... _368204930

Just take a printed copy of these t's and c's in case of query.

pete75
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Joined: 24 Jul 2007, 2:37pm

Re: Ryanair bike policy

Postby pete75 » 13 Apr 2018, 6:06am

Flying with Ryanair is an entirely voluntary act. If you don't like their terms and conditions or charges don't fly with them. There are other airlines.

millimole
Posts: 512
Joined: 18 Feb 2007, 5:41pm
Location: Leicester

Re: Ryanair bike policy

Postby millimole » 13 Apr 2018, 8:25am

Rob_Judge wrote: Next time it will be EasyJet both ways!


You see, this is the problem - I've vowed never to fly with EasyJet ever again, and would choose to fly Ryanair every time.
This is after being completely screwed over following a cancelled flight and their total disregard of their legal obligations.

The more general point is that when we 'pay cheap' it's great until the slightest thing goes wrong and we discover that the business is all front, and there's zero customer service behind the front end.

I'm a trendy consumer. Just look at my gormless idiot phone.
Leicester; Riding my Hetchins since 1971; Audaxing on my Dawes; Riding to work on a Decathlon Hoprider

CiaranJam
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Joined: 15 Oct 2018, 12:43am

Re: Ryanair bike policy

Postby CiaranJam » 15 Oct 2018, 12:56am

I've found this thread quite useful, so thanks for all of the posts so far.

In regard to Ryanair's baggage policy they list Sports Equipment (up to 20kg) and Bikes (up to 30kg). From another forum (KiteForum), it seems as though Sport Equipment can have a dimension of 119x119x81cm.

Considering there are bike boxes that weigh under 20kg with a carbon bike which are smaller than 119x119x81cm, what's stopping someone from just booking the case as Sport Equipment for £35? Do the staff actually ask you what's in the case/ask you to show them? It just seems a little ridiculous that you have to pay an extra £25 just because the case contains a bike but I guess that's Ryanair for you.

Serenabikelover
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Joined: 15 Oct 2018, 3:47am

Re: Ryanair bike policy

Postby Serenabikelover » 15 Oct 2018, 4:19am

Is there anyone who knows the Ryanair and Easyjet policy for wheels? I want to take 2 extra wheels with me in round wheel bags with air-protector, will they be considered as normal cabin luggage or special sports luggage?

Graham O
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Joined: 27 Jan 2007, 7:54am

Re: Ryanair bike policy

Postby Graham O » 15 Oct 2018, 7:28am

CiaranJam wrote: It just seems a little ridiculous that you have to pay an extra £25 just because the case contains a bike .......


If the bike is disassembled and fits into a box/case which is within normal luggages sizes, then it can go as normal checked in luggage which is cheaper. It only goes as a bike if it is in one piece and hence is longer than normal luggage. I asked Ryannair about this in 2017 and they confirmed it, although, of course, policies can change. In the end I flew with it as a bike as it was more convenient.

Graham O
Posts: 635
Joined: 27 Jan 2007, 7:54am

Re: Ryanair bike policy

Postby Graham O » 15 Oct 2018, 7:30am

Serenabikelover wrote:Is there anyone who knows the Ryanair and Easyjet policy for wheels? I want to take 2 extra wheels with me in round wheel bags with air-protector, will they be considered as normal cabin luggage or special sports luggage?


From what I found out last year, see above post, if the wheels fit inside a normal size piece of luggage/case or box, then treat them as checked in luggage. They won't fit in the cabin, but there should be no need to declare them as special sports equipment. But check before you fly.

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100%JR
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Joined: 31 May 2016, 10:47pm
Location: High Green,Sheffield.

Re: Ryanair bike policy

Postby 100%JR » 15 Oct 2018, 3:08pm

We flew to Mallorca again in May (from Manchester) with the bike(Carbon) and all luggage inside a BikeboxAlan and it was still under the weight limit.
Outward-EasyJet £35.
Inward Ryan Air €49.
The only issue,that wasn't really and issue,was CO2 canisters.As I declared them at check-in in Manchester a "dedicated" member of staff had to be called in to put a sticker on the box.RyanAir would not allow them in the hold on the return journey but allowed them in my hand luggage!?!?
We saw plenty of people carrying wheel bags at the Airport(s) but not sure how they booked them.We also saw one bloke at Manchester Airport with wheels(in a wheel bag) strapped to the outside of his bike box :o Not sure I'd want to do this after witnessing the staff throwing Bike boxes into the hold!
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Serenabikelover
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Joined: 15 Oct 2018, 3:47am

Re: Ryanair bike policy

Postby Serenabikelover » 16 Oct 2018, 3:15am

Graham O wrote:
Serenabikelover wrote:Is there anyone who knows the Ryanair and Easyjet policy for wheels? I want to take 2 extra wheels with me in round wheel bags with air-protector, will they be considered as normal cabin luggage or special sports luggage?


From what I found out last year, see above post, if the wheels fit inside a normal size piece of luggage/case or box, then treat them as checked in luggage. They won't fit in the cabin, but there should be no need to declare them as special sports equipment. But check before you fly.


Thanks Graham
I will connect the two wheel bags together as one check-in luggage.

simonhill
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Joined: 13 Jan 2007, 11:28am
Location: Essex

Re: Ryanair bike policy

Postby simonhill » 16 Oct 2018, 8:08am

Why not put them in cardboard box. They will be better protected and you can add a bit of extra padding.as well. Also no chance of them getting separated.

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CJ
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Joined: 15 Jan 2007, 9:55pm

Re: Ryanair bike policy

Postby CJ » 22 Feb 2020, 6:13pm

Ryanair seem to have altered that bit of their terms and conditions linked to above. The same link (under heading 3.6) now says nothing about bikes being able to weigh up to 30kg. And the T&Cs never did say exactly what was meant by that, although the context suggests that it must be the same kind of limit as the 20kg limit applying to other luggage and sports equipment, ie the point at which excess baggage charges kick in. This is sort of confirmed under the next heading (3.6) by the use of a different and bigger number of kg as the actual limiting limit, the heaviest ANYTHING can be never mind how much you pay, ie 32kg. (Unless its mobility equipment, so perhaps if you're a disabled cyclist... !?)

I'm a bit annoyed about this apparent movement of the goalposts, because I carefully checked the T&Cs when I booked my flight last December and even did a live chat session on Ryanair's website, in which I was assured that yes, my bagged bike could weigh up to 30kg without attracting excess baggage charges. So I've now spent a while casting about Ryanair's website for some evidence that this was ever the case and fortunately found this page that gives good reason for one to suppose that this still is the case. Scroll down to 'Travelling with sports equipment'.
RyanairSportsEquip.png
Here it says:
Any sporting item weighing over the 20 kilos allowance will be charged for the excess at the applicable excess baggage rate per kilo.
*Bicycles (max weight 30kg), - MUST be contained in a protective box or protective bike bag...
Still somewhat ambiguous wording, but it'll have to do.

I like the picture even better: a shot of a skier standing with a pair of skies nearly as long as he is tall. What could this be meant to illustrate other than the kind of sports equipment you can take with you on the 'plane: skis, and clearly a good deal longer than the 119cm also stated given in their T&Cs (heading 3.7), just after the 32kg maximum weight, as the largest of the maximum dimensions (81cmx119cmx119cms) for anything to be taken on the plane, or carried in the hold. A lot of cardboard bike boxes and some bags are a bit longer than that, mine included, but not (unless the man's a midget) as long as those skis! I've not heard of anyone getting stopped due to excess length of bike-box or bag, but it's good to have some evidence for one's assumptions.

So I've printed a screenshot of that part of that page and will take it with me to check-in. Fingers crossed.
Chris Juden
One lady owner, never raced or jumped.

tim-b
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Joined: 10 Oct 2009, 8:20am

Re: Ryanair bike policy

Postby tim-b » 23 Feb 2020, 6:13am

Hi
It's too late now, but either print live chats to a PDF printer, e.g. Foxit, or print screen (PRT SCR on keyboards) and paste as an image. You'll keep a record that you can email to your smart phone or print on paper as needed
Stable door, bolts and all that, hope that it all works out
Regards
tim-b
~~~~¯\(ツ)/¯~~~~

Fairweather
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Joined: 14 Feb 2020, 12:43pm

Re: Ryanair bike policy

Postby Fairweather » 23 Feb 2020, 8:46am

I've traveled with a steel bike on Ryanair many times. I put it in a clear plastic bag, so the handling staff can see exactly what it is (stops them standing on it!)

Never had an issue, but I would probably draw the line at a carbon bike/wheels.

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CJ
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Re: Ryanair bike policy

Postby CJ » 10 Mar 2020, 7:07pm

I thought you might like to know that it all went fine, even though the 'Bicycle Sports Equipment' luggage item actually weighed about 31kg. I told RyanAir's check-in staff "about 30kg" when asked and there were no quibbles, either outward at East Midlands or return from Arrecife. I don't think they actually had any means of weighing it at check-in. I daresay it gets weighed on the Large Items luggage conveyor, but that's a long way from the original check-in desk, which has already given it a baggage tag and by this stage there is no apparent process for collecting excess baggage fees. Although the generic handling staff here could and doubtless would refuse anything that was obviously over the general 32kg limit.

Here's a photo of how the bike looks when I lift it out of the package, which is a large DHB bag (larger than any they curently seem to sell) in which I put a very snug-fitting cardboard bike delivery box about 1.4m long. It's a shame you can't easily buy a bike bag this big anymore, because leaving the rear wheel in keeps your chainset off the ground and avoids all the hassle of removing the rear mudguard and carrier (and possibly the rear lamp wiring) on a touring bike. Box-in-bag seems a good combination, box for stiffness and bag to protect the cardboard from abrasion, but makes it harder to keep under the weight limit, especially as I planned the broadest possible interpretation of the phrase 'sports equipment' (cycling being the whole purpose of my trip after all), to put nearly ALL of my stuff in there and not to pay for any other item of luggage. For I had noted that (unlike EasyJet) Ryanair says nothing about other things than the bike itself going into the box/bag and they do, after all, charge more than any other airline for carrying a bike!

MysteronPacked.jpg

The front guard is nestled with the relevant wheel in the wheel-bag and the package strapped under the top tube is a pair of off-bike Crocs, to provide frame cushioning as well as reducing pannier bulk. A rack-top-bag (containing helmet stuffed in and around with sundry small items of bike gear) went in the bottom of the box just behind the forks, followed by the saddle & post, inverted with padded post between crank and frame. Pedals, by the way, are strapped together and onto the rear wheel with the left one screwed in the back of its crank. The panniers - Ortlieb front sized - were half emptied to make them slim enough to stow one bottom-left behind the front wheel-bag and the other on the right of the frame (under the Crocs).

Half the contents of the panniers, my OMD camera and a small handlebar bag (Ortlied Compact) containing additional lenses, went in a shoulder bag (conference freebie) that exactly satisfies the very restrictive underseat stowage size limits (40x25x20cm) of the one luggage item Ryanair allow you for free. This bag, containing the clothes I wore to travel in, was left inside the bike-box/bag at the start/finish hotel. And in case you're thinking it would've made more sense to travel in the Crocs rather than cycling shoes with metal cleats, which are noisy and slippery on tiled floors and have to be taken off at X-ray, I wholeheartedly agree. However I couldn't risk their extra weight (Crocs weigh almost nothing) taking the bike-box/bag over the 32kg limit!

And by the way, it IS a carbon bike: Holdsworth Mystique gravel bike frame, which makes a surprisingly good touring bike - given a few minor modifications and if equipped quite differently from how Planet-X like to sell it!
Chris Juden
One lady owner, never raced or jumped.