Getting used to Clipless Pedals

General cycling advice ( NOT technical ! )
Thornyone
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Re: Getting used to Clipless Pedals

Postby Thornyone » 16 Apr 2018, 8:07am

Redvee wrote:Having ridden SPD pedals for 25+ years I've still had moments with them but rarely, I had my first moment after 2 minutes of riding :oops: but I'm so used to them now that I usually come to a complete stop before I unclip.

Even after 25 years!!! I just didn’t feel that I could afford a “moment” when riding in traffic, given my capacity to fall sideways when there was no traffic. If setting off in heavy traffic at a junction and finding that you have to stop suddenly after about five feet, how do you overcome the problem of wanting your foot out of the clip at almost the very moment that it has just clunked in because the very act of applying force to the pedal engages the cleat? I just envisaged myself falling sideways under a bus :( .

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anniesboy
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Re: Getting used to Clipless Pedals

Postby anniesboy » 16 Apr 2018, 8:44am

Why not use one pedal clipless and the other non clipless ,when you are confident just clipless with both.

My concern after many years clipless is my foot coming off when not expecting it,I also once had a problem when one the two screws on plate came off allowing the plate to swivel.

Airsporter1st
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Re: Getting used to Clipless Pedals

Postby Airsporter1st » 16 Apr 2018, 8:57am

Thornyone wrote:
Redvee wrote:Having ridden SPD pedals for 25+ years I've still had moments with them but rarely, I had my first moment after 2 minutes of riding :oops: but I'm so used to them now that I usually come to a complete stop before I unclip.

Even after 25 years!!! I just didn’t feel that I could afford a “moment” when riding in traffic, given my capacity to fall sideways when there was no traffic. If setting off in heavy traffic at a junction and finding that you have to stop suddenly after about five feet, how do you overcome the problem of wanting your foot out of the clip at almost the very moment that it has just clunked in because the very act of applying force to the pedal engages the cleat? I just envisaged myself falling sideways under a bus :( .


I use the multi release SPD cleats and since changing to them, I have never had a problem of releasing in a hurry. I started off at the lowest tension and have gradually increased - now about mid-way. I’ve only used them for a relatively short time but already I don’t even think about them anymore.

Thornyone
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Re: Getting used to Clipless Pedals

Postby Thornyone » 16 Apr 2018, 9:22am

Airsporter1st wrote:I use the multi release SPD cleats and since changing to them, I have never had a problem of releasing in a hurry. I started off at the lowest tension and have gradually increased - now about mid-way. I’ve only used them for a relatively short time but already I don’t even think about them anymore.

Sounds like I may have got on better had those been available years ago when I took the plunge (metaphorically and literally). I think I’m now too old to learn new tricks :lol:

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Re: Getting used to Clipless Pedals

Postby Vorpal » 16 Apr 2018, 9:29am

You can try using them on a turbo or spinning bike for a bit before riding on the road.

You can also just have a go a few time at a country park, or another place with some off road tracks.
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mjr
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Re: Getting used to Clipless Pedals

Postby mjr » 16 Apr 2018, 10:00am

Just remember they're not obligatory or necessary. I gave up on clipping in years ago. I don't need to sprint (which is where it helps - ignore the random usually-unsubstantiated claims about efficiency because the evidence about that is very weak and mixed) so can't really see any point, plus my knees and ankles sometimes lock up (which can obstruct unclipping) and my feet aren't the easiest to find good shoes for.
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pjclinch
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Re: Getting used to Clipless Pedals

Postby pjclinch » 16 Apr 2018, 10:27am

I've long used Time ATACs which have loads of float and have no need of faffing about with release tension. I was about to say I've never had any trouble releasing, but am reminded of a general issue with two-bolt systems which is make sure they're tight (and grease the threads first). If they're not tight then the shoe can twist while the cleat stays put which increases the chances of everything going The Way Of The Pear quite dramatically (don't ask me how I know this...).

That shouldn't affect 3-bolt road systems, but with my use profile if I can't walk sensibly I'm not interested.

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pjclinch
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Re: Getting used to Clipless Pedals

Postby pjclinch » 16 Apr 2018, 10:55am

mjr wrote:Just remember they're not obligatory or necessary. I gave up on clipping in years ago. I don't need to sprint (which is where it helps - ignore the random usually-unsubstantiated claims about efficiency because the evidence about that is very weak and mixed) so can't really see any point, plus my knees and ankles sometimes lock up (which can obstruct unclipping) and my feet aren't the easiest to find good shoes for.


They're certainly not necessary, but suggesting it's all mainly sprinting is a bit odd. I use them to help me get heavy loads up hills on my cargo bike, where I can assure you sprinting is not happening!

The efficiency thing is pretty straightforward but widely misunderstood. People go on about being able to pull up as well as push down which is all a bit dubious on a concerted effort, but the really handy thing is being able to push the pedal forwards at the top of the stroke, where a plain platform relies on inertia to get it through the dead spot. They allow you to get closer to the mythical "pedalling in circles", and at high cadences help keep your feet in place which again helps keep things running nicely. It looks as if they've been deprecated a fair bit off-road in recent years with people going for studded platform pedals and shoes with thick soft outsoles, which can be thought of as a very loose but still positive retention grip.

My general hack bike has one-sided clipless pedals with a mech on one side and a platform on the other. It works fine in normal shoes, but if I'm going to put on outdoor shoes anyway I'll usually choose my cleated ones as they make hills that bit easier.

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Audax67
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Re: Getting used to Clipless Pedals

Postby Audax67 » 16 Apr 2018, 11:18am

Double-faced SPDs for me: fast & easy to use. And in the cases where I've come off the bike for unrelated reasons, they've always unclipped without me doing anything.
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tatanab
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Re: Getting used to Clipless Pedals

Postby tatanab » 16 Apr 2018, 11:23am

pjclinch wrote:People go on about being able to pull up as well as push down which is all a bit dubious on a concerted effort,
Or ---pull backwards. Being so used to clipless (23 years preceded by 25 with toeclips) I was not aware of how I pull backwards at the bottom the the stroke when pulling away. I discovered this when I fitted toeclips to a utility machine and found myself pulling my foot out as I moved off.

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mjr
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Re: Getting used to Clipless Pedals

Postby mjr » 16 Apr 2018, 1:00pm

pjclinch wrote:[...] the really handy thing is being able to push the pedal forwards at the top of the stroke, where a plain platform relies on inertia to get it through the dead spot.

Crushing one's toes in an effort to push forward with something bolted to the sole doesn't sound like it can be efficient. It seems much better to take a micro-rest through the dead spot, or if you're struggling to pass the dead spot, lean back to push forwards.

pjclinch wrote:They allow you to get closer to the mythical "pedalling in circles", and at high cadences help keep your feet in place which again helps keep things running nicely. It looks as if they've been deprecated a fair bit off-road in recent years with people going for studded platform pedals and shoes with thick soft outsoles, which can be thought of as a very loose but still positive retention grip.

Plus it has the benefit of varying the position more than if you're clipped to one "right" place, which I suspect helps to reduce the risk of cramp that seems to afflict so many clippers.
MJR, mostly pedalling 3-speed roadsters. KL+West Norfolk BUG incl social easy rides http://www.klwnbug.co.uk
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pjclinch
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Re: Getting used to Clipless Pedals

Postby pjclinch » 16 Apr 2018, 4:08pm

mjr wrote:
pjclinch wrote:[...] the really handy thing is being able to push the pedal forwards at the top of the stroke, where a plain platform relies on inertia to get it through the dead spot.

Crushing one's toes in an effort to push forward with something bolted to the sole doesn't sound like it can be efficient. It seems much better to take a micro-rest through the dead spot, or if you're struggling to pass the dead spot, lean back to push forwards.


What is this "crushing one's toes" of which you speak?
You did say you had problem getting suitably fitting shoes so i guess that's involved, but my toes come out resolutely un-crushed, and not only when I'm in my SD65 SPuD sandals...

Leaning back to push forwards more efficient than just pedalling in circles? I have my doubts, noting that the smoothest most efficient power delivery is associated with TT specialists where nothing much is moving aside from their legs. And if you don't want to push forwards nobody forces you to: it's an option you have.

mjr wrote:Plus it has the benefit of varying the position more than if you're clipped to one "right" place, which I suspect helps to reduce the risk of cramp that seems to afflict so many clippers.


Who are these "many clippers" of whom you speak?

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Airsporter1st
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Re: Getting used to Clipless Pedals

Postby Airsporter1st » 16 Apr 2018, 5:29pm

Thornyone wrote:I think I’m now too old to learn new tricks :lol:


I came back to cycling at age 63, having previously used toe clips/straps, so age is no barrier!

the_twin
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Re: Getting used to Clipless Pedals

Postby the_twin » 16 Apr 2018, 6:06pm

For the benefit of the OP, I doubt there is any disagreement that some way of making a secure connection between foot and pedal is a very good idea. All methods, clipless pedals, toe clips and straps or DMR V8s and a pair of cast off Vans have their pros and cons. A DMR V8 in the shin is definitely something to be avoided. However without doubt one of the more unpleasant experiences on a bike is a foot slipping off a wet cheap rubber pedal followed rapidly by the family jewels whacking the crossbar or a falling off.

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Re: Getting used to Clipless Pedals

Postby busb » 16 Apr 2018, 6:51pm

I had a pair of the original Shimano SPDs & shoes. The pedals weighed more than the rest of the bike! I set them & several new pairs since to fairly minimal release torque. As long as I can heft the bike into the air without disengaging - that's fine for me.
I did fall over at a T junction when I didn't unclip soon enough a week in, the lorry driver behind me was probably amused. 80k or so miles later, I've fallen off about 4 times when stationary but never felt I'd had a close shave. I've no experience of road clipless - I've studiously avoided them - preferring to be able to walk properly & not damage pub floors!