Lightweight ladies bike

General cycling advice ( NOT technical ! )
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The utility cyclist
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Re: Lightweight ladies bike

Postby The utility cyclist » 16 Sep 2018, 12:50am

grufty wrote:Brompton?

Over rougher terrain/trails, wheels size isn;t ideal, even less so for someone who is relatively inexperienced, bigger wheelsize offers more stability/control

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Re: Lightweight ladies bike

Postby Vorpal » 16 Sep 2018, 1:09am

I suggest that you put together a list of three or four bikes for your friend to try, and let her decide if something like hydraulic brakes is an unnecessary complication or a nice system. She may find them easier to use.
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Re: Lightweight ladies bike

Postby Bonefishblues » 16 Sep 2018, 8:27am

The utility cyclist wrote:
iandusud wrote:Thanks for those suggestions. I've sent her a few links, including the Trek, which is my pick of the bunch, although I've suggested that if she does go for it that she gets the shop to swap the tyres out for something a bit wider, 35 or 38mm. I've avoided bikes with disc brakes as I consider them an unnecessary complication for the leisure usage that she has in mind.

Hydraulic disc brakes should be less maintenance than rim brakes according to most that use them. Personally I'm happy with Vs/mini Vs fully loaded though they are higher end arms and pads..

The good thing about the Trek is that it has carbon forks, it'll help dampen some of the vibrations, the description says it comes with 35mm tyres, so odd that it has 32mm in the spec further down :?
I would also get rid of the aluminium riser bar which I reckon will be too stiff and too wide, a narrower (56cm) carbon fibre one would be perfect, they aren't that expensive and they really are beneficial for increasing comfort for the hands, arms & shoulders. I've been using a carbon flat bar on my daily for the last 10 years and it's one of the best investments I ever made.

good luck with it all.

I confess to a slight giggle at your linking a couple of bikes with discs and the OP regarding their use as unnecessary :D

BTW I agree with you, lest you think I'm having a go!

OP - as the budget's a good one, how about:

https://www.evanscycles.com/pinnacle-ch ... e-EV306268 . There are cheaper options in the range, but I think this might be an out of the box solution, even down to the tyres.

It's a straight copy of the Kona Coco with extended gears as far as I can see. If your friend wanted lower gears (although the low's pretty low as-is), then a triple could be fitted pre-sale.

Kona Coco for comparison:
https://winstanleysbikes.co.uk/kona-coc ... bike-small

grufty
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Re: Lightweight ladies bike

Postby grufty » 16 Sep 2018, 8:59am

The utility cyclist wrote:
grufty wrote:Brompton?

Over rougher terrain/trails, wheels size isn;t ideal, even less so for someone who is relatively inexperienced, bigger wheelsize offers more stability/control


I agree in principle with the bigger wheelsize/stability thing and yes the Brompton can be twitchy until you get used to it. Offsetting these factors you have more nimble steering on rougher tracks, surprisingly useful suspension, upright position and low stepover (as requested by the OP).
Bromptons are often our preferred choice (over Trolls) where we live in south lakeland for many routes that include offroad, much to the chagrin of many mtb-ers. This is mainly due to their relative lightness/ease of carrying and the ability to use public transport. A bit cheaper than a Jubilee and excellent residual value.

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Re: Lightweight ladies bike

Postby The utility cyclist » 16 Sep 2018, 12:11pm

grufty wrote:
The utility cyclist wrote:
grufty wrote:Brompton?

Over rougher terrain/trails, wheels size isn;t ideal, even less so for someone who is relatively inexperienced, bigger wheelsize offers more stability/control


I agree in principle with the bigger wheelsize/stability thing and yes the Brompton can be twitchy until you get used to it. Offsetting these factors you have more nimble steering on rougher tracks, surprisingly useful suspension, upright position and low stepover (as requested by the OP).
Bromptons are often our preferred choice (over Trolls) where we live in south lakeland for many routes that include offroad, much to the chagrin of many mtb-ers. This is mainly due to their relative lightness/ease of carrying and the ability to use public transport. A bit cheaper than a Jubilee and excellent residual value.

and all the bikes I linked had low stepover, upright as much as you want and the bigger tyres give you all the suspension you'll need. Sorry, just don't see how a brommie is superior