Wrist mirror

General cycling advice ( NOT technical ! )
Mike_Ayling
Posts: 185
Joined: 25 Sep 2017, 3:02am
Location: Melbourne Australia

Re: Wrist mirror

Postby Mike_Ayling » 13 Dec 2018, 9:59am

Mick F wrote:
Greystoke wrote:Helmet ones seem a good idea but haven't tried one.


First, you need a helmet to fit it to. :wink:
I no longer own one.


I live in a nanny statewhere helmets are mandatory!

Mike

User avatar
Mick F
Spambuster
Posts: 47126
Joined: 7 Jan 2007, 11:24am
Location: Tamar Valley, Cornwall

Re: Wrist mirror

Postby Mick F » 13 Dec 2018, 10:44am

I've cycled in Tasmania, Sydney, Adelaide, Melbourne and Bunbury.
This was back in 1988 and helmets hadn't been invented. :wink:
Mick F. Cornwall

User avatar
Mick F
Spambuster
Posts: 47126
Joined: 7 Jan 2007, 11:24am
Location: Tamar Valley, Cornwall

Re: Wrist mirror

Postby Mick F » 13 Dec 2018, 10:46am

Tasmania.
On my way from Hobart to Port Arthur.
Wombats.jpg
Wombats.jpg (94.09 KiB) Viewed 304 times
Mick F. Cornwall

scottg
Posts: 675
Joined: 10 Jan 2008, 8:44pm
Location: Highland Heights Kentucky,, USA

Re: Wrist mirror

Postby scottg » 13 Dec 2018, 1:39pm

Oy, you can also fit them to your glasses.

Pic of the late Chuck Harris with eyeglass mirror, maker of helmet & glasses mirrors.

dsc_01571.jpg
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Why not the best, buy Cyclo-Benelux.

iandriver
Posts: 2197
Joined: 10 Jun 2009, 2:09pm
Location: Cambridge.

Re: Wrist mirror

Postby iandriver » 13 Dec 2018, 3:43pm

I use a mirror all the time. I generally position it so that it's seen from the hand position on the bars that covers the brakes. I tend to find if I need to be looking in the mirror, I'm likely to need the brakes at a similar time.
Supporter of the A10 corridor cycling campaign serving Royston to Cambridge http://a10corridorcycle.com. Never knew gardening secateurs were an essential part of the on bike tool kit until I took up campaigning.....

User avatar
andrew_s
Posts: 4995
Joined: 7 Jan 2007, 9:29pm
Location: Gloucestershire

Re: Wrist mirror

Postby andrew_s » 13 Dec 2018, 4:44pm

Speaking as a drop bar user, the only mirror I've found useful is the Mirrycle (Original in my case; there is an STI version that fits some Shimano STI levers).

The primary use of handlebars is for your hands, so anywhere that obstructs a regularly used hand position is no good.
Anything that requires you to adjust your own riding position (eg move your arm, or your head to look round the arm) is no good - you lose the "quick glance" check, and may as well just turn your head and look properly.
A bar end mirror is behind the arm in a normal riding position (quite apart from bar end shifters using the position), and often isn't set wide enough that the view isn't obstructed by your hip, the saddlebag pockets etc.
Down tube mirrors are obstructed by you, and by any luggage you may be carrying on the rear of the bike.
Eyeglass mirrors have a field of view that is too narrow to see behind without moving the head (to say nothing of obstruction by hair, hats etc). I don't use a helmet, but I expect a helmet mirror is similar.

A wrist mirror may be useful if you almost always use the same riding position (eg on the lever hoods), but I wouldn't think it's likely enough to warrant spending money to find out.

Flat bar mirrors are much easier, generally being a bit higher and wider than what you'd get on a drop bar. The main problem would be parking knocks changing the alignment, or crash damage.

Brucey
Posts: 36191
Joined: 4 Jan 2012, 6:25pm

Re: Wrist mirror

Postby Brucey » 13 Dec 2018, 5:13pm

a small curved (convex) helmet mirror has the potential to offer a good solution; offering a (steerable) wide angle view with minimal obstruction. But theory is one thing, practice is another. When I get old and stiff/deaf enough not to be able to turn around or hear vehicles coming up behind I'll investigate mirrors more thoroughly but in the meantime I'm happy enough without.

cheers
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Brucey~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Mike_Ayling
Posts: 185
Joined: 25 Sep 2017, 3:02am
Location: Melbourne Australia

Re: Wrist mirror

Postby Mike_Ayling » 13 Dec 2018, 9:36pm

Mick F wrote:I've cycled in Tasmania, Sydney, Adelaide, Melbourne and Bunbury.
This was back in 1988 and helmets hadn't been invented. :wink:


They had certainly been invented by then!

I think that Victoria was the first cab off the rank in about 1990.

Mike

User avatar
Mick F
Spambuster
Posts: 47126
Joined: 7 Jan 2007, 11:24am
Location: Tamar Valley, Cornwall

Re: Wrist mirror

Postby Mick F » 14 Dec 2018, 6:01am

Mike_Ayling wrote:
Mick F wrote:I've cycled in Tasmania, Sydney, Adelaide, Melbourne and Bunbury.
This was back in 1988 and helmets hadn't been invented. :wink:


They had certainly been invented by then!
No doubt they had been, but not as a "device" for normal everyday cyclists.
Mick F. Cornwall

gxaustin
Posts: 519
Joined: 23 Sep 2015, 12:07pm

Re: Wrist mirror

Postby gxaustin » 14 Dec 2018, 3:25pm

A bar end mirror is behind the arm in a normal riding position (quite apart from bar end shifters using the position), and often isn't set wide enough that the view isn't obstructed by your hip, the saddlebag pockets etc.


Er, no it isn't obstructed by my arm, my saddlebag is sufficiently narrow and I don't use bar end shifters. Mine is just fine and very useful for keeping a group ride together as well as spotting traffic. It might be obstructed by one's arm if permanently on the drops - but I ride on the hoods for the most part.

Mike_Ayling
Posts: 185
Joined: 25 Sep 2017, 3:02am
Location: Melbourne Australia

Re: Wrist mirror

Postby Mike_Ayling » 15 Dec 2018, 9:33am

Mick F wrote:
Mike_Ayling wrote:
Mick F wrote:I've cycled in Tasmania, Sydney, Adelaide, Melbourne and Bunbury.
This was back in 1988 and helmets hadn't been invented. :wink:


They had certainly been invented by then!
No doubt they had been, but not as a "device" for normal everyday cyclists.


https://www.davison.com/blog/2013/05/14 ... le-helmet/

Extract from above:

By the 1970’s, a group called the Snell Foundation began comprehensive testing of bicycle helmets and found that none of the helmets on the market were really effective, so they established some basic criteria for head protection, which coincided with the bike boom of the 1970’s, when many American adults took up cycling as an exercise and a sport. Then in 1975, Bell Auto parts invented the first real helmet for cyclists. It consisted of a hard plastic shell padded with a foam-like material. This was the beginning of the modern helmet.

Mike

thirdcrank
Posts: 28684
Joined: 9 Jan 2007, 2:44pm

Re: Wrist mirror

Postby thirdcrank » 15 Dec 2018, 10:37am

There can't be many types of recumbent where the rider easily turn round to for a rear view

User avatar
mjr
Posts: 14215
Joined: 20 Jun 2011, 7:06pm
Location: Norfolk or Somerset, mostly
Contact:

Re: Wrist mirror

Postby mjr » 15 Dec 2018, 11:03am

thirdcrank wrote:There can't be many types of recumbent where the rider easily turn round to for a rear view

Nor many small bar end mirrors that would work. Many helmet or glass mirrors would be full of seat back, too. I only recall seeing those long arm foldable ones on recumbents but I'm forgetful.
MJR, mostly pedalling 3-speed roadsters. KL+West Norfolk BUG incl social easy rides http://www.klwnbug.co.uk
All the above is CC-By-SA and no other implied copyright license to Cycle magazine.

Brucey
Posts: 36191
Joined: 4 Jan 2012, 6:25pm

Re: Wrist mirror

Postby Brucey » 15 Dec 2018, 11:20am

Image

Bell 'biker' from 1975

Image

Bell 'V1 pro' from 1983

cheers
Last edited by Brucey on 15 Dec 2018, 11:34am, edited 1 time in total.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Brucey~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

thirdcrank
Posts: 28684
Joined: 9 Jan 2007, 2:44pm

Re: Wrist mirror

Postby thirdcrank » 15 Dec 2018, 11:33am

mjr wrote: ... Nor many small bar end mirrors that would work. Many helmet or glass mirrors would be full of seat back, too. I only recall seeing those long arm foldable ones on recumbents but I'm forgetful.


As I posted above, a recumbent rider of my acquiantance dangles a mirror from his wrist. When it's needed, he holds it rather like a make-up mirror but for looking behind rather than at his mush. Whatever the ideological objections, it's very effective.