Bike washing

General cycling advice ( NOT technical ! )
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foxyrider
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Bike washing

Postby foxyrider » 31 Dec 2018, 6:19pm

I don't think my bikes have ever been as mucky as they've got this autumn/winter, i'm actually a bit embarrassed by the muck. I live in an upper floor flat so wet washing isn't going to happen anytime soon - or is it?

Has anyone got/used a self contained 'power' washer, either battery or hand pumped? I've had a quick look and there are models from @ £15 to Gott knows.
So recommendations/experience, do you use soap or just water? Which models do you have? How much water will give a thorough wash?
I've got some Chrimbo money burning a hole so i'm keen to purchase soon!
Convention? what's that then?
Airnimal Chameleon touring, Orbit Pro hack, Orbit Photon audax, Focus Mares AX tour, Peugeot Carbon sportive, Owen Blower vintage race - all running Tulio's finest!

mnichols
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Re: Bike washing

Postby mnichols » 31 Dec 2018, 6:29pm

I used a garden sprayer for a while, the type that you spray weeds with on large areas such as an allotment. I bought it from wikinsons. You pump a hand!e that creates pressure in the cyclinder and then release via a nozzle spray.

The pros/cons was that it was a very low pressure mist. Enough to wet it, but not enough to dislodge stuck on mud. The benefit was it was so low pressure as to not worry the seals and bearings.

I went back to a bucket and sponge after a while, now using a bucket and brush

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Mick F
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Re: Bike washing

Postby Mick F » 31 Dec 2018, 6:36pm

Do you have a bike stand?
What I've done in the horrible weather when I need to clean the bike, is to mount the bike on the stand in the kitchen and remove the wheels. They get washed in the kitchen sink.
The frame etc gets wiped down with a damp cloth and rinsing it in the sink.
Reassemble, and let it all dry.
Mick F. Cornwall

mnichols
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Re: Bike washing

Postby mnichols » 31 Dec 2018, 6:41pm

I have a bike stand, kitchen sink and wife

They are not compatible

whoof
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Re: Bike washing

Postby whoof » 31 Dec 2018, 7:36pm

When the mud is dry brush it with an old tooth brush then wash with a bucket and sponge. You can put the brush and bucket on the ground floor then go and get the bike. I doubt anyone will steal your brush and bucket whilst you are getting your bike.

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LinusR
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Re: Bike washing

Postby LinusR » 31 Dec 2018, 7:47pm

foxyrider wrote:I don't think my bikes have ever been as mucky as they've got this autumn/winter, i'm actually a bit embarrassed by the muck. I live in an upper floor flat so wet washing isn't going to happen anytime soon - or is it?

Has anyone got/used a self contained 'power' washer, either battery or hand pumped? I've had a quick look and there are models from @ £15 to Gott knows.
So recommendations/experience, do you use soap or just water? Which models do you have? How much water will give a thorough wash?
I've got some Chrimbo money burning a hole so i'm keen to purchase soon!


I live two floors up so have to wash my bikes on the street. I use a hand pumped pressure washer. Powerful enough to shift mud but not enough to wreck the bearings. https://www.drapertools.com/product/82469/Pressure-Sprayer-(10L) It is best to wash the bike as soon as possible after riding as it is easier to shift the muck. After day or two stuff gets caked on and you have to attack it with a stiff brush. I use cold water in the sprayer and have a bucket of hot soapy water with a cloth to deal with the muckier bits. Since I got a mountain bike I seem to have to do a lot more bike washing :?

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foxyrider
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Location: Sheffield, South Yorkshire

Re: Bike washing

Postby foxyrider » 31 Dec 2018, 8:36pm

whoof wrote:When the mud is dry brush it with an old tooth brush then wash with a bucket and sponge. You can put the brush and bucket on the ground floor then go and get the bike. I doubt anyone will steal your brush and bucket whilst you are getting your bike.


You're kidding right? They'd nick the hub caps off a moving car! :lol:
Convention? what's that then?
Airnimal Chameleon touring, Orbit Pro hack, Orbit Photon audax, Focus Mares AX tour, Peugeot Carbon sportive, Owen Blower vintage race - all running Tulio's finest!

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foxyrider
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Location: Sheffield, South Yorkshire

Re: Bike washing

Postby foxyrider » 31 Dec 2018, 8:38pm

LinusR wrote:
foxyrider wrote:I don't think my bikes have ever been as mucky as they've got this autumn/winter, i'm actually a bit embarrassed by the muck. I live in an upper floor flat so wet washing isn't going to happen anytime soon - or is it?

Has anyone got/used a self contained 'power' washer, either battery or hand pumped? I've had a quick look and there are models from @ £15 to Gott knows.
So recommendations/experience, do you use soap or just water? Which models do you have? How much water will give a thorough wash?
I've got some Chrimbo money burning a hole so i'm keen to purchase soon!


I live two floors up so have to wash my bikes on the street. I use a hand pumped pressure washer. Powerful enough to shift mud but not enough to wreck the bearings. https://www.drapertools.com/product/82469/Pressure-Sprayer-(10L) It is best to wash the bike as soon as possible after riding as it is easier to shift the muck. After day or two stuff gets caked on and you have to attack it with a stiff brush. I use cold water in the sprayer and have a bucket of hot soapy water with a cloth to deal with the muckier bits. Since I got a mountain bike I seem to have to do a lot more bike washing :?


Mine are road bikes - oozing more mud and stuff this winter than the MTB ever did!
Convention? what's that then?
Airnimal Chameleon touring, Orbit Pro hack, Orbit Photon audax, Focus Mares AX tour, Peugeot Carbon sportive, Owen Blower vintage race - all running Tulio's finest!

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foxyrider
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Re: Bike washing

Postby foxyrider » 31 Dec 2018, 8:41pm

Mick F wrote:Do you have a bike stand?
What I've done in the horrible weather when I need to clean the bike, is to mount the bike on the stand in the kitchen and remove the wheels. They get washed in the kitchen sink.
The frame etc gets wiped down with a damp cloth and rinsing it in the sink.
Reassemble, and let it all dry.


I could use the bath and do the whole bike but TBH i'd rather not! As for the w/s - it makes enough mess just doing a service without all the [inappropriate word removed] Farmer Giles and co thin my bike needs to wear being added to that. You must have a big sink, even my Airnimal wheels wouldn't go in my sink!
Convention? what's that then?
Airnimal Chameleon touring, Orbit Pro hack, Orbit Photon audax, Focus Mares AX tour, Peugeot Carbon sportive, Owen Blower vintage race - all running Tulio's finest!

whoof
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Re: Bike washing

Postby whoof » 31 Dec 2018, 8:53pm

foxyrider wrote:
whoof wrote:When the mud is dry brush it with an old tooth brush then wash with a bucket and sponge. You can put the brush and bucket on the ground floor then go and get the bike. I doubt anyone will steal your brush and bucket whilst you are getting your bike.


You're kidding right? They'd nick the hub caps off a moving car! :lol:

If someone would steal a used toothbrush and old bucket the streets near you must be pristine as they would be stealing the fag butts off the pavement.

PH
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Re: Bike washing

Postby PH » 31 Dec 2018, 10:35pm

I use the jet wash at the garage up the road, power rinse setting is plain water, keep it away from the bearings and wash along the bike rather than across it and I've never had a problem. IMO it's a quid well spent.

reohn2
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Re: Bike washing

Postby reohn2 » 31 Dec 2018, 11:28pm

I use an ex Cillit Bang squirty bottle filled with water with a good squirt of washing up liquid in it.Squirt it all over the bike then brush with a soft brush bought as a part of one of those dust pan and brush sets.
I then rinse the bike off with the hose but can't see why one of those hand pumped garden sprayers wouldn't do the trick,I reckon 5ltr of water would do the trick,something like this perhaps?:- https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Home-Chemica ... ect=mobile

I then give th bike a good bounce to rid it of excess water then wipe it down with an old bath towel.
The job takes no more than about 10minutes.
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mjr
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Re: Bike washing

Postby mjr » 1 Jan 2019, 12:53am

Bucket of hot water and zip wax to wash the frame with a noodle sponge mitt, then engineer's brush, fancy £2 cassette cleaning hook and oily rags to clean the chain and cogs.
MJR, mostly pedalling 3-speed roadsters. KL+West Norfolk BUG incl social easy rides http://www.klwnbug.co.uk
All the above is CC-By-SA and no other implied copyright license to Cycle magazine.

francovendee
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Joined: 5 May 2009, 6:32am

Re: Bike washing

Postby francovendee » 1 Jan 2019, 9:07am

:D :D :D :D :D :D
mnichols wrote:I have a bike stand, kitchen sink and wife

They are not compatible

jimlews
Posts: 225
Joined: 11 Jun 2015, 8:36pm

Re: Bike washing

Postby jimlews » 1 Jan 2019, 10:48am

whoof wrote:When the mud is dry brush it with an old tooth brush then wash with a bucket and sponge. You can put the brush and bucket on the ground floor then go and get the bike. I doubt anyone will steal your brush and bucket whilst you are getting your bike.


+1

Stand bike on newspapers, brush off dry mud onto latter. Wrap and dispose of. Wipe over bike with oily rag.