Looks about 100 kilometers is me maxed out

General cycling advice ( NOT technical ! )
ndwgolf
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Re: Looks about 100 kilometers is me maxed out

Postby ndwgolf » 28 Jan 2019, 9:04am

We smashed it
Image
Looking at the numbers, first ride in October on a MTB and 119 kilos. Today’s ride on a road bike and 108ish.
Can’t wait to go back out on Friday and do the same ride again but on Friday it will be after my bike fitting on Wednesday.......... funny enough no knee pain today just lower back pain after all the hills, hopefully the bike fit will sort that bit out.
Neil


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thirdcrank
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Re: Looks about 100 kilometers is me maxed out

Postby thirdcrank » 28 Jan 2019, 2:53pm

If you spend / waste a lot of time looking at your computer, it may be that the 100 is a bit of a mental block. I've always found that no matter what the distance, I begin to feel bad when I'm "nearly there." For that reason I've never split a long ride up into chunks because each interim target has just meant more pain, to be dissipated again at the restart. (I'm using the present tense but my distance riding days are long-gone.) If your computer has dual distance mode, try switching to measuring in miles. The distance ridden will be the same, but the "ton" will take longer to appear on your screen.

Otherwise, forget the computer and enjoy your riding.

Vorpal
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Re: Looks about 100 kilometers is me maxed out

Postby Vorpal » 28 Jan 2019, 3:27pm

Well, I think it's a matter of perspective.

I can comfortably do 100 kilometres with relatively little training, but only if I take my time doing it.

An average speed of 27.3 km/h is pretty fast. My typical speed is more like 17 or 18 kph. Up to 20 - 22 kph if I am particularly fit and been cycling lots. Shorter distances I can do faster, if I'm so inclined, but I don't usually.

27.3 kph for 100 km? I'd be knackered, and probably have some pain in various places, as well.

I wouln't worry too much about it. If you want to go further, relax and spin more.
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Mistik-ka
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Re: Looks about 100 kilometers is me maxed out

Postby Mistik-ka » 28 Jan 2019, 5:20pm

thirdcrank wrote: … If your computer has dual distance mode, try switching to measuring in miles. The distance ridden will be the same, but the "ton" will take longer to appear on your screen.

I'd sooner stick to metric measurement. 100 kilometres sounds much nobler to me than 62 miles. 8)

thirdcrank
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Re: Looks about 100 kilometers is me maxed out

Postby thirdcrank » 28 Jan 2019, 5:30pm

Mistik-ka wrote: ... I'd sooner stick to metric measurement. 100 kilometres sounds much nobler to me than 62 miles. 8)


When assessing what's been achieved, then kms are ideal, but when contemplating the task ahead, I'm all for miles.

thelawnet
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Re: Looks about 100 kilometers is me maxed out

Postby thelawnet » 29 Jan 2019, 1:43pm

Samuel D wrote:
thelawnet wrote:Tbh if I do 100km on the road in England my knees will feel it a bit, but the point is more that the fatigue is greater in the heat so any perceived tiredness in various limbs is greater and hence more time is required to rest.

Depends on the person to a large extent. I go better the warmer it gets until well over 30°C. The greatly reduced resistance to cycling at higher temperatures and higher humidities (for a list of reasons) mean less power is needed for a given speed, so even though working at a given power may be harder, you don’t need to work as hard. For these reasons Bradley Wiggins had the velodrome climate set to tropical for his hour record. Outdoors the difference is even greater because we need bulky winter clothing in the winter, which further harms aerodynamics.


I deal with people doing walking in the jungle in Indonesia. The temperature is less than 30 C, but at lot of people are completely wiped out, despite having walked 100s of miles in Peru or whatever. Admittedly some of this is due to lack of grip - Westerners tend to cope poorly with slippery surfaces, but primarily it's a function of very high humidity.

Cycling might be slightly different, but the problems with cycling IME are the fluid loss, which is about 4x faster than in tropical weather than in freezing conditions, and the sun - around noon, plus or minus a few hours, the heat & direct sunshine will wipe you out very quickly.

I don't think aerodynamics really come into things in that there's no real reason you would cycle at the same speed in the tropics as you would in the English winter - if you are suffering more air resistance (and this is not necessarily the case, unless your hot weather clothes are suitably tight), then you can simply cycle slower - a given amount of effort is a given amount of effort, that one results in more distance because of aero clothing is not really the issue.

Samuel D
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Re: Looks about 100 kilometers is me maxed out

Postby Samuel D » 29 Jan 2019, 3:13pm

Walking is indeed different because you don’t get cycling’s rapid evaporative cooling of sweat. (You’re so right about westerners coping badly with poor grip! I lived in Brazil for years and noticed a great contrast between the average Brazilian’s ability to handle their own body and the average European’s. Balance, poise, reaction times, appropriate physical reaction in a panic situation, the Brazilians are just far better at it all. Talking about average people, not young athletes who are obviously good in all countries.)

thelawnet wrote:if you are suffering more air resistance (and this is not necessarily the case, unless your hot weather clothes are suitably tight)

Not sure I understand this wording. Cycling in the cold is harder because cold air is substantially denser; you need draggy clothing for that cold, so you take a second aerodynamic hit; dry air is denser (especially at high temperatures, i.e. high humidity at 30+°C is beneficial); tyres have higher rolling resistance at low temperatures; and bearing and chain lubricants have higher viscosity at lower temperatures. My typical speed in the summer is much higher for these reasons, even though I ride all year around.

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foxyrider
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Re: Looks about 100 kilometers is me maxed out

Postby foxyrider » 29 Jan 2019, 3:16pm

Vorpal wrote:Well, I think it's a matter of perspective.

I can comfortably do 100 kilometres with relatively little training, but only if I take my time doing it.

An average speed of 27.3 km/h is pretty fast. My typical speed is more like 17 or 18 kph. Up to 20 - 22 kph if I am particularly fit and been cycling lots. Shorter distances I can do faster, if I'm so inclined, but I don't usually.

27.3 kph for 100 km? I'd be knackered, and probably have some pain in various places, as well.

I wouln't worry too much about it. If you want to go further, relax and spin more.

It is a goodly pace for a pleasure ride, that said last year I did 178km at 37kph avg (including stops). I wouldn't want to ride that pace every day, I generally average between 21 and 28kph depending on terrain/weather.
Convention? what's that then?
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