New hybrid - Trek vs Marin ?

General cycling advice ( NOT technical ! )
washtenaw
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New hybrid - Trek vs Marin ?

Postby washtenaw » 7 Feb 2019, 5:02pm

Looking for relatively cheap hybrid but want something a bit above entry level models. Would be for frequent long rides out into quite hilly countryside, some off-road use on bridleways, bike paths etc but mostly on-road use. Definitely want wider tires and flat bars of hybrid. Old bike had v-brakes but want to try discs now. 2 main options :

Trek FX 2 Disc 2019 £450 https://www.teamcycles.com/products/trek-fx-2-disc

In stock in store (quite rare, sold out everywhere else, none available till March), have actually seen it and sat on it (not test ridden though) and think it looks great !!!

Marin Fairfax SC3 2018 £399 (w/ 10% discount £360) https://www.cyclesurgery.com/p/marin-fairfax-sc3-2018-Q3214220.html

Will need to be ordered into store, have seen similar models and same model in smaller size. Not too impressed with appearance, look a bit flimsy and not the best colours. Only found out about Marin through this review which praised Fairfax SC1 over Trek/Giant etc https://thewirecutter.com/reviews/best-hybrid-commuter-bike/

Marin has some better components, and is 27 speed as opposed to 24, but as of now can get it for £90 less than Trek.

Front De-railleur - Marin : Altus / Trek : Tourney
Rear De-railleur - Marin : Alivio Shadow 9-speed / Trek : Acera 8-speed
Hydraulic Disc Brakes - Marin : Shimano BR-M315 / Trek : Tektro HD-M275

Marin would be obvious winner, however the shop selling it does not have very good online reviews. Its a national chain, and reviews are for every store and on-line sales, so not necessarily reflective of local store, but doesn't bode well. Shop selling Trek is complete opposite, very good reviews.

The bike shops near me that sell Treks tend to be more reputable, shops selling Marins not so much. I don't think this means that Marins are worse in any way, and at reduced prices are likely a much better value bike. But I think in terms of things like aftercare etc or if anything goes wrong, Trek is the better choice, even if more expensive with lesser components.

Can anyone see a clear choice over one or the other considering the circumstances ?!?!

Cheers

thelawnet
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Joined: 27 Aug 2010, 12:56am

Re: New hybrid - Trek vs Marin ?

Postby thelawnet » 7 Feb 2019, 9:19pm

They are both pretty entry-level. I'm not sure how much after-sales service you need on a bike like that really - there's nothing exotic or what have you. The frame or fork won't break. The chains & cables will wear out as a service item.

Marin is a bit lighter (700 g?)

The Schwalbe tyres on the Marin are rubbish, the Bontrager idk, maybe similar?

The Marin has EF shifters, which I don't like as they look naff & are combined brake & gears. The Trek has better shifters, for sure.

The Tourney FD is fine.

I am not sure that the Alivio RD necessarily shifts better than the Acera ones.

The Shimano hydros are their cheapest ones, they do work very well , but not necessarily better or worse than Tektro?

8 speed vs 9 speed is the same really.

Marin is the same thing as Polygon -t hey are made in Indonesia. Trek, probably made in China?

The gearing is 48/36/26 and 11-34 on the Marin & 48/38/28 with 11-32 on the Trek. Quite similar, though the Marin has a slightly easier gear if you wanted ever to fit MTB tyres or something and go off road?

This is probably a bit small for you, but £323 after discount code. https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Pinnacle-Lit ... 3086121165 It's probably made in the same factory as the Marin; spec is a bit like the Trek, but with Shimano discs, rather than Tetkro it's slightly more off-road oriented
Last edited by thelawnet on 8 Feb 2019, 9:45am, edited 1 time in total.

washtenaw
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Joined: 7 Feb 2019, 4:05pm

Re: New hybrid - Trek vs Marin ?

Postby washtenaw » 7 Feb 2019, 11:08pm

Thanks for the reply . . .

thelawnet wrote:They are both pretty entry-level. I'm not sure how much after-sales service you need on a bike like that really - there's nothing exotic or what have you. The frame or fork won't brake. The chains & cables will wear out as a service item.


Considering this then, there is another bike I was looking at, but had ruled it out as the store selling it is about 25 miles away and not the easiest to get to with public transport (don't drive).

Giant Escape 2 Disc 2018 £350 https://www.infinitycycles.co.uk/27525/products/giant-escape-2-disc-hybrid-bike.aspx

Similar/same components as the Trek, except has Altus RD instead of Acera. My old bike has Altus, never had any problems with it.

thelawnet wrote:Marin is a bit lighter (700 g?)


This wouldn't surprise me, Marin frame def looks lighter, although also looks less sturdier than Trek.

thelawnet wrote: The Schwalbe tyres on the Marin are rubbish, the Bontrager idk, maybe similar?


I actually have Schwalbe Road Cruiser tyres on my old bike and think they're great, that being said they did replace very old and worn Continental Contacts I had on that bike for years. I don't particularly like the look of the tread on the Luganos though. They actually have the Road Cruisers on the model below though, the Fairfax SC2 (almost same as SC3 but with v-brakes).

thelawnet wrote:The Marin has EF shifters, which I don't like as they look naff & are combined brake & gears. The Trek has better shifters, for sure.


Thanks for pointing that out, didn't even realise !!!

thelawnet wrote:The Tourney FD is fine.


From what I've heard the FD tend to be less crucial/fiddly than the RD

thelawnet wrote: Trek, probably made in China?


I've heard that (some?) Trek frames are actually made in the Giant factory in Taiwan.

thelawnet wrote:The gearing is 48/36/26 and 11-34 on the Marin & 48/38/28 with 11-32 on the Trek. Quite similar, though the Marin has a slightly easier gear if you wanted ever to fit MTB tyres or something and go off road?


I suppose an easier gear would be helpful for the hilly area I live in, but def no desire to ever fit MTB tyres, I want to be as fast as possible with the option of a bit of off-road if needed.

thelawnet wrote:This is probably a bit small for you, but £323 after discount code. https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Pinnacle-Lit ... 3086121165 It's probably made in the same factory as the Marin; spec is a bit like the Trek, but with Shimano discs, rather than Tetkro it's slightly more off-road oriented


Yes, unfortunately a bit small, def need XL size as am 6'1

thelawnet
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Re: New hybrid - Trek vs Marin ?

Postby thelawnet » 8 Feb 2019, 10:34am

washtenaw wrote:I actually have Schwalbe Road Cruiser tyres on my old bike and think they're great, that being said they did replace very old and worn Continental Contacts I had on that bike for years. I don't particularly like the look of the tread on the Luganos though. They actually have the Road Cruisers on the model below though, the Fairfax SC2 (almost same as SC3 but with v-brakes).


Schwalbe make good tyres, but Luganos aren't them.
https://www.bicyclerollingresistance.co ... ugano-2015

I suppose an easier gear would be helpful for the hilly area I live in,


TBH a 28/32 is quite low for the road already. There's never any harm in having a lower gear, but it depends how unfit you are.

Jamesh
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Re: New hybrid - Trek vs Marin ?

Postby Jamesh » 8 Feb 2019, 7:40pm


washtenaw
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Re: New hybrid - Trek vs Marin ?

Postby washtenaw » 11 Feb 2019, 2:45pm

Jamesh wrote:Marin is cheap at Rutland?
https://www.google.com/shopping/product ... _UQgjYI5AY


They do indeed, they have the Marin Fairfax SC1 for £280 (which was specifically in Wirecutter review I mentioned).

Unfortunately they had a few bad reviews and I really want to pick up my bike from an actual shop, knowing that it's been put together correctly and to which I can take it back to in case of any after-purchase issues. Also, almost all shops around me have a free servicing 6 to 10 weeks after purchase. Would have to pay for that if I went with Rutland.

Bonefishblues
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Location: Near Bicester Oxon

Re: New hybrid - Trek vs Marin ?

Postby Bonefishblues » 11 Feb 2019, 3:17pm

washtenaw wrote:
Jamesh wrote:Marin is cheap at Rutland?
https://www.google.com/shopping/product ... _UQgjYI5AY


They do indeed, they have the Marin Fairfax SC1 for £280 (which was specifically in Wirecutter review I mentioned).

Unfortunately they had a few bad reviews and I really want to pick up my bike from an actual shop, knowing that it's been put together correctly and to which I can take it back to in case of any after-purchase issues. Also, almost all shops around me have a free servicing 6 to 10 weeks after purchase. Would have to pay for that if I went with Rutland.

I have bought from Rutland. Excellent. They set up and maintain dozens of bikes that get used and abused every single day on their hire fleet. A proper professional outfit IME. Insist on pick up in person from one of their centres and you can try before you buy.

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The utility cyclist
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Re: New hybrid - Trek vs Marin ?

Postby The utility cyclist » 11 Feb 2019, 4:18pm

I was recently looking for a friend for a new hybrid, came across this. Unfortunately in Bridlington so not much use unless you're local to the shop but seems well specc'd for the price and has a carbon fork and guards to boot so even better. https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/GIant-bike-s ... SwW8RbHwI7

I've always bought near new used for the value, my own Specialized Globe pro as a barely used bargain, under £300 and fitted with LX/XT components, plus carbon post, seatstays, handlebars. My sons' Sirrus pro was £330 and again that got him 105 drivetrain with Ultegra flat bar shifters plus carbon stays and forks.

If you're buying a low end disc braked bike then you might as well open yourself to the option of V brake bikes, all things considered why have low end discs when you can have better Vs for less? Personally I see no benefit for road riding of discs over rim at any level of riding and the price jump for disc braked bikes takes them up a notch over their v braked cousins.

hope your choice works out for you.

thelawnet
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Re: New hybrid - Trek vs Marin ?

Postby thelawnet » 11 Feb 2019, 11:02pm

The utility cyclist wrote:If you're buying a low end disc braked bike then you might as well open yourself to the option of V brake bikes, all things considered why have low end discs when you can have better Vs for less? Personally I see no benefit for road riding of discs over rim at any level of riding and the price jump for disc braked bikes takes them up a notch over their v braked cousins.


Low-end discs aren't all that low-end. At least, the Shimano ones aren't.

I don't think you'll find better brakes than the M315s on any hybrid bike.

Better disc brakes are more relevant to mountain biking and you might get ceramic disc brakes, more pad choices, more brake disc styles, etc.

The best v-brake Trek hybrid has the same v-brakes as the cheapest Trek hybrid, so I don't think the v-brakes will be particularly high quality compared to any other v-brake on the market. Of course if you prefer v-brakes for other reasons, that's fine, but the brakes fitted to either disc or v-brake models are likely to be adequate examples of either brake type.

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The utility cyclist
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Re: New hybrid - Trek vs Marin ?

Postby The utility cyclist » 12 Feb 2019, 11:02pm

thelawnet wrote:
The utility cyclist wrote:If you're buying a low end disc braked bike then you might as well open yourself to the option of V brake bikes, all things considered why have low end discs when you can have better Vs for less? Personally I see no benefit for road riding of discs over rim at any level of riding and the price jump for disc braked bikes takes them up a notch over their v braked cousins.


Low-end discs aren't all that low-end. At least, the Shimano ones aren't.

I don't think you'll find better brakes than the M315s on any hybrid bike.

Better disc brakes are more relevant to mountain biking and you might get ceramic disc brakes, more pad choices, more brake disc styles, etc.

The best v-brake Trek hybrid has the same v-brakes as the cheapest Trek hybrid, so I don't think the v-brakes will be particularly high quality compared to any other v-brake on the market. Of course if you prefer v-brakes for other reasons, that's fine, but the brakes fitted to either disc or v-brake models are likely to be adequate examples of either brake type.

Disc brakes still offer no discernable benefit, riders go faster, brake later, just like ABS and bigger discs on motors they don't improve overall safety and for bike riders we are at the point where we are running out of thinking time because people think they can brake ever later in any given scenario.
If I can still brake just fine with 100kg person plus load in the alps on Vs (having done faster on single pivot weinmann's BITD), brake just fine at circa 40mph in wet/dry in the UK and urban riding year after year then IMO there's absolutely no need for discs at all unless you're bothered about wearing through your carbon braking surface.
It's not surprising that disc braked bikes are giving less value by comparison to caliper/Vs, in addition far too often one reads about poor braking from discs on bikes far more expensive than that the OP is considering.
So if you can get same safety and better spec/wider choice of bike why wouldn't you at least consider the options?

I'll never go disc, I have all the bikes/frames and bits I'll need for a very long time (all 4 main materials) so I'm confident that I've acquired for at least the next 20 years hopefully more, that will see me through to my 70s, that includes a (branded) full carbon with pannier/mudguard eyelets that has Avid 7 Vs.
Each to their own but restricting your choice and paying more for getting less isn't that great a decision.