... about kickbikes?

General cycling advice ( NOT technical ! )
hercule
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... about kickbikes?

Postby hercule » 4 Jun 2019, 10:46pm

I was in our local John Lewis the other day, trying to amuse myself as my OH was engrossed in the haberdashery department when I noticed a woman wheeling something round that on first glance looked like a part folded folding bike. On closer inspection (discretely hiding behind the displays of diaries, pens, etc) it was no bike but some kind of scooter. It looked like it had 20" wheels and was a lot more bike-like than micro scooters that you sometimes see the local youff cavorting about on. Altogether more adult and possibly more practical.

I did some research after getting hime, searching for "big wheel scooters" didn't produce any meaningful results when suddenly I stumbled on Kickbikes (which I understand is the name of a Finnish company that makes these things).

Then I realise this might help a problem I have...

I am a keen runner but since last summer have been beset by knee problems (after shifting a 90kg slab, I hasten to add, nothing to do with running). Vigorous rehab has made enough difference to get me back running again but I am still limited and my fitness has taken a bit of a toll. Bizarrely cycling makes it worse, and attempts to while away the hours on my turbo in the winter resulted in a knee that swelled up to twice its usual size. Again I'm back on the bike (or in my case, recumbent trike) but I still can't put the effort in that I used to.

Kickbikes seem an interesting hybrid between running and cycling. Part of my running is exercising two of our energetic dogs, I take them out canicross-style several times a week but my own body weight's worth of pulling dogs doesn't help my achy knee. I've realised that I have in fact seen kickbikes before used as a variation of canicross.

Has anyone round here had any experience of them? My thoughts are that they might be a viable cross training alternative to running. I am a pretty poor mountain biker and in any case to get the sort of exercise I get out of running I need to spend at least twice the time if not more cycling to achieve the same effect. Bizarre perhaps, but I'm looking for something harder than cycling and more like running. A kickbike might also solve the dog exercise problem: I've never felt I have had sufficient control to manage the dogs off road on an MTB but something like a kickbike can hopefully be quickly dismounted if my hairy friends get a bit too excitable! Plus with no drivetrain they seem usefully low maintenance - more like running than cycling.

I've had passing interest in Eliptigos for a similar reason but they seem potentially very heavy and probably not as forestry track and dog compatible as I might like - and not very portable either.

Any experiences would be much appreciated! I live a long way from urban centres so testing one out is going to be challenging.

Norman H
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Re: ... about kickbikes?

Postby Norman H » 5 Jun 2019, 8:05am

This might interest you.

reohn2
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Re: ... about kickbikes?

Postby reohn2 » 5 Jun 2019, 8:54am

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hercule
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Re: ... about kickbikes?

Postby hercule » 5 Jun 2019, 1:17pm

Thanks - I’d read the LEJOG thread. The Swifty Mk3 looks exactly like what I saw part folded. New varifocals must have made the wheels look bigger!

ratherbeintobago
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Re: ... about kickbikes?

Postby ratherbeintobago » 6 Jun 2019, 7:10am

I’ve a friend who uses one to commute across Castlefield, but then he works in the ‘creative’ industries...

foreversummer
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Re: ... about kickbikes?

Postby foreversummer » 9 Jun 2019, 7:49am

My hubby and I have recently purchased Kick Bikes. I have a Yedoo Trexx, and my hubby a Yedoo Wolfer (racing model), Yedoos are made by a Czech company where kick biking is very popular. There are many different models available, with different wheel sizes and also folding ones.
With the front wheels removed they fit in our small car easily and so are great for exploring new cities, tow paths, large parks etc. The large front wheels enable the scooters to roll easily and they are light enough that you can pick them up and carry them if needed eg. down steps
They are really good fun and generate lots of smiles from the public.
The ride is harder work than cycling so they are great for fitness. We live close to a large park with varied terrain, I can do a 3 mile circuit of the park and be home in 30 minutes. We plan on using them for fitness in the winter when it is too cold to cycle.
I love mine and highly recommend it. If anyone is interested in them speak to Ondreij at Op Scooters https://www.opscooters.com



A0048AF9-CF08-4FC4-91B0-F43BD5285FC3.jpeg
Our kick Bikes

hercule
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Re: ... about kickbikes?

Postby hercule » 9 Jun 2019, 11:02am

Thanks for your comments, foreversummer. I seem to be in danger of flipping from the “those might be handy” to “I really need one!”

Half an hour’s running gives me a short but effective workout, it seems like a scooter could do the same; I really struggle to achieve the same sort of aerobic effect on a bike in that time, and now there is a high chance of my knee blowing up if I try.

I’ve thought that I need at least a 20” wheel at the back; I have one bike with 16”/305 wheels and it really becomes hard work off tarmac. Light weight also seems a must, there seems to potentially be a big difference between brands; there’s no gearing advantage for getting up hills.

I seem to be swithering between one of the Yedoo Trexx (7.9 kg) or the Kickbike Safari (heavier at just under 10kg but with Schwalbe tyres and full mudguards). The equivalent racing models (Yedoo Wolfer and Kickbike Race Max 20) look a bit too fragile for forest tracks without the clearances for say 32mm tyres on the front. Did you try out any other models before you got yours, and if so why did you choose the ones you have now?

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Mick F
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Re: ... about kickbikes?

Postby Mick F » 9 Jun 2019, 11:13am

How do you go up hills on them?
Mick F. Cornwall

hercule
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Re: ... about kickbikes?

Postby hercule » 9 Jun 2019, 11:41am

I'd imagined kick harder, or jump off and run or even walk... all good exercise!

reohn2
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Re: ... about kickbikes?

Postby reohn2 » 9 Jun 2019, 11:45am

Mick F wrote:How do you go up hills on them?

People who don't ride bikes ask the same question.
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hercule
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Re: ... about kickbikes?

Postby hercule » 9 Jun 2019, 11:51am

And everyone asks the that question about recumbents. In the case of trikes: slowly and in comfort!

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Mick F
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Re: ... about kickbikes?

Postby Mick F » 9 Jun 2019, 11:58am

reohn2 wrote:
Mick F wrote:How do you go up hills on them?

People who don't ride bikes ask the same question.
Yes, but when it's explained, they understand even if they couldn't do it themselves.

A push scooter is fine on the flat and is brilliant down hills, but absolutely pointless when you come to an uphill.
It is easier to pick it up and walk in the hope there's a downhill coming.

If I had a job in the centre of Plymouth and owned one, I could carry it up Gunnislake Hill to the station, take the train to Plymouth, and it's downhill all the way to the city centre.
On the way home, carry it to the station, take the train back to Gunnislake, and whizz down the hill home.

Sounds like fun ........... except for the carrying it uphill thing.
Mick F. Cornwall

reohn2
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Re: ... about kickbikes?

Postby reohn2 » 9 Jun 2019, 12:26pm

Whilst I admit steep hills would be a problem on a scooter/kickbike I don't think all hills are,obviously the example you give is in a particularly hilly part of the country and where most people wouldn't use such a machine for local transport,though they may choose an electrically powered scooter for such short trips were they legal,as preference over a bicycle.
I think it's important to understand what people's requirements are for short distance travel in preference to a car with all the disadvantages to overcome by using one if not now then possibly in future.

I don't think personal transport of this type and bikes are taken seriously enough by local and national government in this country,we have our heads stuck firmly in the car=transport scenario,that's mainly because we can't seem to think outside the box on four wheels :?
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Mick F
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Re: ... about kickbikes?

Postby Mick F » 9 Jun 2019, 12:35pm

Yes, you're right of course. I was just being argumentative! :lol:
The link https://swiftyscooters.com and the YouTube video says that these scooters are "go anywhere".

No they aren't.
Screen Shot 2019-06-09 at 12.34.01.png
Mick F. Cornwall

reohn2
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Re: ... about kickbikes?

Postby reohn2 » 9 Jun 2019, 12:54pm

I think I'd prefer 20in wheels front and rear wheels similar to the Swifty scooters but their prices are bonkers with the cheapest 20 inch wheel one at at £439 :shock: and I'm not convinced by the rear wheel fold being durable enough in daily use.
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