How important is familiarity in choosing equipment?

General cycling advice ( NOT technical ! )
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Sweep
Posts: 5638
Joined: 20 Oct 2011, 4:57pm
Location: London

Re: How important is familiarity in choosing equipment?

Postby Sweep » 9 Jul 2019, 9:56pm

I am totally with you on your approach horizon.

And like me (trust you won't take offence) I have the impression that you are a slow learner and forget things.

It's taken me a long time to get to know what little I know, I still do most things with a book in hand, and I am clever enough to know that I forget things. So have been known to come back here searching out my own posts :)

I won't be going above 9 speed but that's not because I'm a luddite - I just have no need of it.

I find it really satisfying to gradually tweak a bike build until it's near perfect. Or at least to me.

I see no need to go and buy a "new tech" bike to have to learn lots of extra stuff for the sake of it if it gives no benefit.

And to try to get a feel for it - never sure if it's my tinkering or the bike that isn't quite right.

I always think of new computer operating systems - am sure you know who I am talking about - you often have to upgrade to do no more.

At least there part of the justification may be so that you can share stuff/interact with folk on the latest systems.

Doesn't apply to bikes. My bike doesn't have to "talk to" other bikes - I can talk to their riders as I breeze along with them - whatever they are on.

Yes it's good for folk to learn new stuff but there's a lot of other new stuff to learn to keep your mind active.

And bike rides to plan and do.

Have just built up an 8 speed - rides wonderfully.

Am now collecting old bits - and as brucey says it is now very easy to get hold of them - often virtually new.

Oh am reminded of someone on another forum. He had had an XT front mech - said it had done very well on his bike and given years of sterling service. The mech is now discontinued so he was asking what to replace it with. I know that mech - it is excellent and I have a few as new second-hand ones laid up - one cost me a tenner. I advised him to get another one. Even though he had acknowledged that it was an excellent mech he found my advice odd - assumed the newer stuff must be better.
Sweep

Greystoke
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Joined: 8 May 2018, 7:41am
Location: Lincolnshire

Re: How important is familiarity in choosing equipment?

Postby Greystoke » 17 Jul 2019, 6:00pm

Well I'm still on 5 & 6 speed freewheels :shock:

reohn2
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Joined: 26 Jun 2009, 8:21pm

Re: How important is familiarity in choosing equipment?

Postby reohn2 » 17 Jul 2019, 8:32pm

Missed this thread.
horizon wrote:......... should I value familiarity over innovation?

Only if familiarity serves you better than the innovation

And is my inertia holding me back or making life easier?

Only if your inertia needs addressing through education if the innovation serves you better than your familiarity.
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I cycle therefore I am.

Brucey
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Re: How important is familiarity in choosing equipment?

Postby Brucey » 17 Jul 2019, 10:50pm

arguably it all boils down to risk vs consequence vs benefit , all as perceived of course.

cheers
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rfryer
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Re: How important is familiarity in choosing equipment?

Postby rfryer » 18 Jul 2019, 8:13am

horizon wrote:So my question is: should I value familiarity over innovation? And is my inertia holding me back or making life easier?

I don't think anyone can tell you what you "should" value. There's no right answer, unless you are using your bike as a tool with a very specific set of parameters that you are trying to optimize for.

Personally, I ride for pleasure, and get enjoyment in multiple aspects; just being out there, getting fitter, tinkering with the bike to make it better, getting experience of different technologies. Other people will enjoy different aspects, or possibly focus more on one, and that will affect what they value.

In answer to your second question, unless your current bike is holding you back in some way, you are almost certainly making life easier by sticking with the familiar. Parts will be cheaper, probably less fragile and easier to set up, and you'll already be equipped with the tools and techniques you need.

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horizon
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Re: How important is familiarity in choosing equipment?

Postby horizon » 21 Jul 2019, 7:26pm

rfryer wrote:In answer to your second question, unless your current bike is holding you back in some way, you are almost certainly making life easier by sticking with the familiar. Parts will be cheaper, probably less fragile and easier to set up, and you'll already be equipped with the tools and techniques you need.


I think this is where I'm at with it.
I have two doctors, my left leg and my right leg. (G. M. Trevelyan)
PS I always wondered why the YHA HQ was called Trevelyan House. :)