Vintage Bicycle Advertisements; good, bad. ugly...

General cycling advice ( NOT technical ! )
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Spinners
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Re: Vintage Bicycle Advertisements; good, bad. ugly...

Postby Spinners » 14 Aug 2019, 7:30am

A lovely thread this...
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reohn2
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Re: Vintage Bicycle Advertisements; good, bad. ugly...

Postby reohn2 » 14 Aug 2019, 9:18am

Love the Kynock poster :D
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Re: Vintage Bicycle Advertisements; good, bad. ugly...

Postby squeaker » 14 Aug 2019, 11:39am

Brucey wrote:Image

'It came with back ache' was my immediate thought :lol:

Definitely a thread for 'too good to loose'...
"42"

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Re: Vintage Bicycle Advertisements; good, bad. ugly...

Postby Brucey » 14 Aug 2019, 12:45pm

Terrot is a name that may be familiar to those interested in old, French, two wheeled things but is largely unknown outside France otherwise. They made both bicycles and motorcycles of high quality and were early adopters of new technologies. They made one of the first 'conventional looking' safety bicycles which were offered with both pneumatic tyres and a derailleur gear (the earliest with a derailleur was, I think, the 'whippet'). In the poster below the scene is of the ~950m Col du Frene, which has a steep (southern) side and a much gentler northern side. You would climb the steep side (as depicted) if you went from Grenoble to Annecy and you deliberately avoided going via Chambery. Going the other way was regarded as dangerous, bearing in mind the state of bicycle brakes at the time. Terrot made good brakes (the machine in question has a kind of pushrod-operated cantilever brake with a rising rate) but apparently even they didn't like to suggest it was actually safe to ride down roads like this.

The lass in question has clearly ascended without breaking sweat, on a gent's bike, leaving disgruntled folk (presumably on lesser machines) in her wake. All this before breakfast (the sun is in the east) too!
Quite what the gesture is meant to convey is lost on me; "oh it was simply nothing" perhaps? But the bicycle clearly sports a derailleur gear and that is where the magic is meant to have come from. You can see the gear lever mounted on the top tube.

Image

Even a detailed view of the mechanism (lower illustration; the upper shows the 'retro-direct' 2s gear) doesn't tell me how the mechanism works exactly; it is quite unlike modern mechanisms;

Image

In the picture above the chain isn't any any sprocket; this is how it looks mid-shift.

Just in case a 2s/3s derailleur was not enough for you, Terrot also offered a TEN SPEED machine as early as 1905, called the 'levocyclette' which used a treadle based drive, with ten positions on the levers for the drive chain.

This can be seen in the poster below on the man's bike.

Image

This poster appears to be based on the first (the posture of the lady rider is the same, but the rendition seems inferior). The location of this summit is unknown to me, but appears to be 108km from Chamonix, and (provided it isn't artistic licence) isn't so high that there are no trees at the summit.

More photos of the gear mechanism are to be found here;

http://www.museonicolis.com/en/terrot-1905/

The treadle drive and basic layout of the mechanism have cropped up several times since, IIRC in the most recent form using spools attached to the hubs (an idea which was used on the Star bicycle from the days of high wheelers I think). However the arrangement has never become accepted in the mainstream. At least the Terrot system ensured that the treadles went up and down in the conventional way; some other systems had no fixed synchronisation between the pedals.
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bagpussctc
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Re: Vintage Bicycle Advertisements; good, bad. ugly...

Postby bagpussctc » 14 Aug 2019, 3:58pm

Fascinating drive system .
Another French classic is the Schulz Funiculo from 1937 . You can see where the inspiration for the Paris Galibier came from .

ImageFuniculo_4_speed_main_image by rebalrid, on Flickr

The 40 tooth rear sprocket goes to show that the current large rear sprocket cluster is nothing new .
Last edited by bagpussctc on 14 Aug 2019, 8:24pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Vintage Bicycle Advertisements; good, bad. ugly...

Postby Brucey » 14 Aug 2019, 7:46pm

that Schulz is also perhaps the inspiration for the Raleigh twenty...? The slightly elevated chainstays seem daft to me; for one thing they will prevent you from fitting a smaller chainwheel and therefore having really low gearing. Interesting staggered seat tube though.

Not long after the safety bicycle was invented, very many frame configurations had already been tried. For example cross-framed designs were common and these obviously didn't have chainstays as we know them in most cases. But some did;

Image
Singer military safety bicycle, 1887, with semi-diamond frame

in this period of experimentation, the one thing they couldn't do (because suitable tubing simply didn't yet exist I suspect) was to use large diameter tubes.

cheers
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bagpussctc
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Re: Vintage Bicycle Advertisements; good, bad. ugly...

Postby bagpussctc » 14 Aug 2019, 8:30pm

Phillips street jewellery .
ImagePhillips Enamel Sign by rebalrid, on Flickr


Time to go shopping!
It got a design award as well.
ImageRaleigh Shopper by rebalrid, on Flickr

bagpussctc
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Re: Vintage Bicycle Advertisements; good, bad. ugly...

Postby bagpussctc » 14 Aug 2019, 8:59pm

Lamps and Bells.... Goes with bell bottom trousers 8)
ImageLucas Lamps & Bells shelf edge strips by rebalrid, on Flickr

Mike Sales
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Re: Vintage Bicycle Advertisements; good, bad. ugly...

Postby Mike Sales » 14 Aug 2019, 9:02pm

Were there still iron bicycles made when Raleigh and Phillips were advertising their all steel steeds?

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Re: Vintage Bicycle Advertisements; good, bad. ugly...

Postby Brucey » 14 Aug 2019, 9:05pm

For the fashionable MTB market, Nishiki went for innovation in 1990; a combination of steel and aluminium in their frameset and straight forks looked well trendy. Another cachet was that it was Cunningham-designed, too. Shame that the net result wasn't all that great to ride. The elevated chainstays seem like a large hammer to crack the flimsy nut that is chainsuck... Is there any real point to the kinked down tube?

There are practical difficulties too (not unique to this bike by any means); for example it is not clear how you get the bottle out of the cage closest to the saddle, or avoid poisoning yourself by drinking the inevitable crud on the third bottle either. The front brake cable is routed through the stem where it goes round a tiny roller inside, where it would be quietly fraying away, just where you couldn't see it, just waiting to break at the least convenient and life-threatening moment. The Deore XT componentry is pretty good stuff, but the chainrings are (despite lacking the usual decals) still those wretched biopace things in the photo. The gear cable for the RD has several (probably draggy, bare metal) guides to take it around various kinks of dubious necessity in the rear subframe. The bike is of course aimed at XC racing; that was 'the thing' then; suspension was for wimps, the handlebars are flat, set low and can't be raised far, and there are are no mounts for mudguards, carriers, or anything vaguely practical like that.

The patter in the ad seems confused; they cite lack of welds in the fork as a good thing, whilst glossing over the fact that the rest of the bike is held together with.... welds.

But in 1990 just looking different was enough to shift a few units. And at least the ad wasn't overtly trying to sell you 'a lifestyle' or anything vomit-inducing like that...

Image
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bagpussctc
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Re: Vintage Bicycle Advertisements; good, bad. ugly...

Postby bagpussctc » 14 Aug 2019, 9:14pm

Another workmate.

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Spinners
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Re: Vintage Bicycle Advertisements; good, bad. ugly...

Postby Spinners » 14 Aug 2019, 9:24pm

The Nishiki Alien and the Alpinestars Al Mega were the coolest MTB's in XC races in the early 1990's. Happy days.
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Brucey
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Re: Vintage Bicycle Advertisements; good, bad. ugly...

Postby Brucey » 14 Aug 2019, 10:02pm

'Landlubber' sold jeans, bells, shirts, jackets, pants, jumpsuits, overalls, western gear and other gear, they say. She's got none of that, and looks very pleased indeed about it. Why bother putting any of that boring clothing stuff in your ad? It can easily be made far more memorable....

The bicycle looks like something French, judging from the Mafac centre pulls and the nasty plastic Simplex RD. Nice bidons.

Image
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Re: Vintage Bicycle Advertisements; good, bad. ugly...

Postby RickH » 14 Aug 2019, 10:10pm

Brucey wrote:Steve Hegg's bike for the 1984 Olympics had lots of 'aero' parts but that didn't extend as far as the chainset or the pedals. Back then he may not have had the choice (Look pedals were just coming on the market at this time I think) but to this day clipless pedals are still not used by some track riders because they prefer the secure feel of (often twin) toes traps.

The majority of those using toestraps on the track these days appear to be using them with clipless pedals rather than instead of them. At least that is what it seems to me when watching both live at the velodrome in Manchester & on TV/Internet.

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Re: Vintage Bicycle Advertisements; good, bad. ugly...

Postby RUDDY » 14 Aug 2019, 10:14pm

Yes great stuff thanks for posting.
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