Vintage Bicycle Advertisements; good, bad. ugly...

General cycling advice ( NOT technical ! )
bagpussctc
Posts: 151
Joined: 27 Oct 2009, 6:45pm

Re: Vintage Bicycle Advertisements; good, bad. ugly...

Postby bagpussctc » 19 Aug 2019, 9:09pm

Paris cycles of London built some interesting machines under the leadership of Harry Rensch .

ImageParis cycles by rebalrid, on Flickr

Sun Bicycles now built by Carlton & both part of the Ti Raleigh set up

ImageSun Cycles by rebalrid, on Flickr

Holdsworths racing team did the taking for them.

ImageHoldsworth by rebalrid, on Flickr

rjb
Posts: 3622
Joined: 11 Jan 2007, 10:25am
Location: Somerset (originally 60/70's Plymouth)

Re: Vintage Bicycle Advertisements; good, bad. ugly...

Postby rjb » 19 Aug 2019, 9:40pm

this is one of my favourites, forget all this ebike nonsense. The best of British :lol:

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At the last count:- Focus Variado, Peugeot 531 pro, Dawes Discovery Tandem, Dawes Kingpin, Raleigh 20, Falcon K2 MTB dropped bar tourer, Longstaff trike conversion on a Falcon corsa. :D

Brucey
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Joined: 4 Jan 2012, 6:25pm

Re: Vintage Bicycle Advertisements; good, bad. ugly...

Postby Brucey » 19 Aug 2019, 11:11pm

when I was a kid, I had a bright orange Mk1 chopper. In nearly every practical respect it was a horrible machine, but I rode it with gusto nonetheless.

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Mine was pretty near a dead ringer for this one

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'Interesting design features' included a handlebar clamp that was incapable of holding the handlebars securely. Even a nine-year old could move the handlebars in the clamp quite easily, and this would happen under heavy braking. The revised chopper had the stem and bars brazed together as a single unit.

A hundred years of bicycle development had lead us to the highly triangulated diamond frame as an efficient solution. We obviously don't need any of that in a Chopper; the rear can be made a quadrilateral so that it will break at the corners. And they did....
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bagpussctc
Posts: 151
Joined: 27 Oct 2009, 6:45pm

Re: Vintage Bicycle Advertisements; good, bad. ugly...

Postby bagpussctc » 20 Aug 2019, 8:00am

Whilst this is not an add in the true sense of the word .It shows there is not much new it cycling.
The 1896 book by A Sharp B.S.c, on bicycles and tricycles an elementary treatise on their design and construction, shows a bicycles fitted with disc wheels.

Image1896 the first disc wheel for bicycles by rebalrid, on Flickr

Brucey
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Re: Vintage Bicycle Advertisements; good, bad. ugly...

Postby Brucey » 20 Aug 2019, 4:56pm

Adler (Eagle) were another company that had their fingers in many pies; bicycles, motorcycles, cars and typewriters amongst other things. Cars were no longer produced after WWII and motorcycle production had ceased by ~1957. I don't know when or if they stopped making bicycles but in their latter years (before various takeovers including eventually being bought out by Olivetti) they concentrated on typewriters and other office equipment.

This poster appears to date from before WWII but bikes with plunger brakes were still being made by some manufacturers well after WWII when they must surely would already have looked like an anachronism.

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geocycle
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Re: Vintage Bicycle Advertisements; good, bad. ugly...

Postby geocycle » 20 Aug 2019, 5:05pm

Brucey wrote:when I was a kid, I had a bright orange Mk1 chopper.
A hundred years of bicycle development had lead us to the highly triangulated diamond frame as an efficient solution. We obviously don't need any of that in a Chopper; the rear can be made a quadrilateral so that it will break at the corners. And they did....


I remember the white vinyl band across the seat saying 'This bicycle is not constructed to carry passengers' -yeah right! That was a challenge that couldn't be ignored.

RubaDub
Posts: 31
Joined: 30 Mar 2019, 10:27am

Re: Vintage Bicycle Advertisements; good, bad. ugly...

Postby RubaDub » 20 Aug 2019, 5:35pm

Brucey wrote:
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'Interesting design features' included a handlebar clamp that was incapable of holding the handlebars securely. Even a nine-year old could move the handlebars in the clamp quite easily, and this would happen under heavy braking. The revised chopper had the stem and bars brazed together as a single unit.

A hundred years of bicycle development had lead us to the highly triangulated diamond frame as an efficient solution. We obviously don't need any of that in a Chopper; the rear can be made a quadrilateral so that it will break at the corners. And they did....


Chopper Sprint.

Image (571).jpg

Brucey
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Re: Vintage Bicycle Advertisements; good, bad. ugly...

Postby Brucey » 20 Aug 2019, 7:53pm

geocycle wrote:
I remember the white vinyl band across the seat saying 'This bicycle is not constructed to carry passengers' -yeah right! That was a challenge that couldn't be ignored.


Mine had that exact message but IIRC a friend's machine (also a Mk1 with the long saddle and the dodgy handlebar clamp) didn't. I have always supposed that it either came off somehow or that perhaps the message didn't appear on the very first machines. The MkII ones had a shortened saddle and still had the message I think.

It was good fun with two on board for about a hundred yards. After that it was uncomfortable and/or just hard work.

cheers
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Brucey
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Re: Vintage Bicycle Advertisements; good, bad. ugly...

Postby Brucey » 20 Aug 2019, 7:57pm

More Adler stuff from the 1920s and earlier; don't let the dress fool you, she's not all she seems...

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Brucey
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Re: Vintage Bicycle Advertisements; good, bad. ugly...

Postby Brucey » 20 Aug 2019, 8:26pm

another retro-look poster

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Brucey
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Re: Vintage Bicycle Advertisements; good, bad. ugly...

Postby Brucey » 20 Aug 2019, 8:35pm

Favor was established as a manufacturer of bicycles in Clermont Ferrand by 1898. In 1919 they started to make motorcycles and continued until the late 1950s. They appear to have made 'cyclomoteurs' until 1974. Exactly when they stopped making bicycles is unknown to me. This poster is meant to be from 1937.

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this poster is in an earlier style

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this one is dated 1927

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there is a book which documents the history of the company, by Jean Malleret

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Brucey
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Re: Vintage Bicycle Advertisements; good, bad. ugly...

Postby Brucey » 20 Aug 2019, 10:15pm

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Brucey
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Re: Vintage Bicycle Advertisements; good, bad. ugly...

Postby Brucey » 20 Aug 2019, 10:19pm

indechirable = tear-proof, or tear-resistant. Presumably just the job if you are worried about terrible gnawing incidents.

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Brucey
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Re: Vintage Bicycle Advertisements; good, bad. ugly...

Postby Brucey » 21 Aug 2019, 7:53am

Bianchi are claimed by some to be the oldest bicycle manufacturing concern still in existence, having been founded in 1885. Like many other manufacturers they made motorcycles (until 1967) and cars until 1969 when the 'AutoBianchi' concern was sold outright to FIAT. Bianchi bicycles were used by Fausto Coppi, Felice Gimondi, and Marco Pantani, amongst others. The classic colour that is used by Bianchi on their race bikes most commonly is of unknown origin (there are plenty of theories) and is variously known as Celeste Blue or celeste green.

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1973 Bianchi team including Marino Basso (who won the 1972 world championship) and Felice Gimondi (who won the 1972 Italian national championship.

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Spinners
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Re: Vintage Bicycle Advertisements; good, bad. ugly...

Postby Spinners » 21 Aug 2019, 8:01am

Sadly, Felice Gimondi passed away last Friday (Aug 16th).
Cycling UK Life Member
PBP Ancien (2007)