Vintage Bicycle Advertisements; good, bad. ugly...

General cycling advice ( NOT technical ! )
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Sweep
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Re: Vintage Bicycle Advertisements; good, bad. ugly...

Postby Sweep » 13 Nov 2019, 8:28am

At the risk of spoiling your wonderful thread with pedantry brucey, surely you mean 18 dollars?
Vintage advertising technique.
Sweep

Brucey
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Re: Vintage Bicycle Advertisements; good, bad. ugly...

Postby Brucey » 13 Nov 2019, 10:14am

these days it would be 17.99 rather than 17.95....

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Bobbin
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Re: Vintage Bicycle Advertisements; good, bad. ugly...

Postby Bobbin » 13 Nov 2019, 11:23am

That would have been about £72 going by the P.G.Wodehouse exchange rate ! :D

RubaDub
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Re: Vintage Bicycle Advertisements; good, bad. ugly...

Postby RubaDub » 14 Nov 2019, 9:57am

Bobbin wrote:That would have been about £72 going by the P.G.Wodehouse exchange rate ! :D


Shouldn't that be in Reichsmarks?

Brucey
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Re: Vintage Bicycle Advertisements; good, bad. ugly...

Postby Brucey » 15 Nov 2019, 10:50pm

the kangaroo was an early form of safety bicycle, in a category of its own known as 'dwarf ordinary', presumably for those who found the idea of a driven rear wheel a bit of a departure from the conventional. I can only imagine that there would have been a fair amount of flex in the frame where the cranks were mounted, and that the bearings to support the cranks must have been very highly loaded. I would expect the drive not to be super-smooth, either, because chains and sprockets at that time were usually of coarse pitch and may not have had rollers either; in 1885 chains had only been in use on bicycles for a few years, and various designs were duking it out for market supremacy. The 'Rover' safety bicycle came out in 1885 and was the first successful safety bicycle of the now familiar form. Arguably the safety bicycle really came into its own when the pneumatic tyre was invented; prior to that there was a school of thought that favoured larger wheels because they rolled more easily on the rough roads of the time.

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The high wheeler didn't die off without a struggle; in the ad below (exact date unknown) it is described as 'more fun than a low wheeler', presumably where fun = risk, this line may have had some appeal to natural dare-devils...

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cheers
Last edited by Brucey on 16 Nov 2019, 9:14am, edited 1 time in total.
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Brucey
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Re: Vintage Bicycle Advertisements; good, bad. ugly...

Postby Brucey » 15 Nov 2019, 11:41pm

1895; 'perfection attained' they say. Well, at 22lbs with chainguard and mudguards, it would shame many modern machines. I'm not quite sure what they mean by 'double-tube pneumatic tyres' unless it is exactly literal; you get two chances before the tyre has to come off the rim (or be unsewn) for the tubes to be patched. Note that the bike is referred to as 'wheels', hence 'the league of American wheelmen' and so on.

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cheers
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drossall
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Re: Vintage Bicycle Advertisements; good, bad. ugly...

Postby drossall » 15 Nov 2019, 11:47pm

Brucey wrote:1895; 'perfection attained' they say.

It's easy to tell. Any company that truly believes that it has achieved perfection, or the ultimate product, will immediately stop developing any new version, model or upgrade. What would be the point?

Polisman
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Re: Vintage Bicycle Advertisements; good, bad. ugly...

Postby Polisman » 16 Nov 2019, 6:14am

I'm trying to find an advertisement for a French (I think) bicycle featuring a monkey on a bike, any ideas?

Brucey
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Re: Vintage Bicycle Advertisements; good, bad. ugly...

Postby Brucey » 16 Nov 2019, 9:13am

Polisman wrote:I'm trying to find an advertisement for a French (I think) bicycle featuring a monkey on a bike, any ideas?


if you search this thread for 'monkey' and 'parrot' you will find one upthread. IIRC it is a Columbia ad; is that the one you were thinking of?

cheers
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Brucey
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Re: Vintage Bicycle Advertisements; good, bad. ugly...

Postby Brucey » 16 Nov 2019, 2:27pm

Other Hercules ads from the 1930s featured steady middle-class types. The more basic model Hercules 'H' model was being pitched at the kind of young man who chatted up shop girls, wearing flannels that are mysteriously unmarked by the astonishingly tight-looking chainguardless chain.

Image

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Brucey
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Re: Vintage Bicycle Advertisements; good, bad. ugly...

Postby Brucey » 16 Nov 2019, 2:30pm

from about 1920; lots of superfluous tubes in the handlebars, frame and fork shows signs of the 'more is more' culture, but when it comes to useful stuff such as chainguards, luggage carriers or more than one brake..... naah, you don't need any of that.... :roll:

Seems to have been going for the 'longest stem and widest bars' trophy.

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