“Dutch” bike brakes

General cycling advice ( NOT technical ! )
ratherbeintobago
Posts: 324
Joined: 5 Dec 2010, 6:31pm

“Dutch” bike brakes

Postby ratherbeintobago » 15 Aug 2019, 5:35pm

(Dutch in inverted commas, as I’ve been in French/Belgian Flanders rather than the Netherlands, and they’re everywhere…)

Why do Dutch bikes have hub brakes rather than discs?

Brucey
Posts: 35544
Joined: 4 Jan 2012, 6:25pm

Re: “Dutch” bike brakes

Postby Brucey » 15 Aug 2019, 7:04pm

because they go for many years without very much maintenance, and take lots of casual bike parking knocks without so much as a murmur of complaint. For utility riding, disc brakes are a flimsy maintenance-intensive joke by comparison.

cheers
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~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Brucey~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

ratherbeintobago
Posts: 324
Joined: 5 Dec 2010, 6:31pm

Re: “Dutch” bike brakes

Postby ratherbeintobago » 15 Aug 2019, 7:26pm

Seems fair enough, though my Hope X2s have had hardly any maintenance in the last 5y (one has been bled once, the other hasn’t) apart from pads, and I wouldn’t be going through those so much if I wasn’t riding in Pennine mud.

How well would hub brakes stop a laden cargo bike?

Brucey
Posts: 35544
Joined: 4 Jan 2012, 6:25pm

Re: “Dutch” bike brakes

Postby Brucey » 15 Aug 2019, 8:19pm

dare I suggest that you won't have treated your bike the same way as everyday transport bikes are treated in the low countries? Quite often these bikes rarely see a spanner or an oilcan between visits to a bike shop. Visits to a bike shop are most usually precipitated by such things as the rear tyre failing, which might be once every 8000 miles or something if heavy duty tyres are used.

Hub brakes vary. So does terrain. If you have a fully laden cargo bike and you have hills, you potentially have a problem. IME 90mm SA hub brakes will stop pretty much anything but if you go down an alpine pass using a heavy/aerodynamic machine such as a velomobile (which has the unfortunate effect of shielding the brakes from the cooling breeze.. :roll: ) then such brakes can overheat.

cheers
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~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Brucey~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

thelawnet
Posts: 2199
Joined: 27 Aug 2010, 12:56am

Re: “Dutch” bike brakes

Postby thelawnet » 16 Aug 2019, 4:49am

Brucey wrote:because they go for many years without very much maintenance, and take lots of casual bike parking knocks without so much as a murmur of complaint. For utility riding, disc brakes are a flimsy maintenance-intensive joke by comparison.

cheers


why the comparison with disc brakes? British utility brakes tend to have v brakes, which on utility bikes are often disconnected, misaligned, stiff and numerous other afflictions.

disc brakes are on slightly more expensive and probably better maintained steeds, not really utility bikes

brynpoeth
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Joined: 30 Nov 2013, 11:26am

Re: “Dutch” bike brakes

Postby brynpoeth » 16 Aug 2019, 5:58am

I love my back-pedal or coaster brake
Entertainer, juvenile, curmudgeon
Cycling-of course, but it is far better on a Gillott
We love safety cameras, we love life

millimole
Posts: 463
Joined: 18 Feb 2007, 5:41pm
Location: Leicester

Re: “Dutch” bike brakes

Postby millimole » 16 Aug 2019, 7:32am

brynpoeth wrote:I love my back-pedal or coaster brake
So do I - I've used them for many years.

I'm seeing disc brakes appearing on newer bargain-basement machines, I would guess these will be the first point of failure.

I'm a trendy consumer. Just look at my gormless idiot phone.
Leicester; Riding my Hetchins since 1971; Audaxing on my Dawes; Riding to work on a Decathlon Hoprider

thelawnet
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Joined: 27 Aug 2010, 12:56am

Re: “Dutch” bike brakes

Postby thelawnet » 16 Aug 2019, 7:45am

millimole wrote:
brynpoeth wrote:I love my back-pedal or coaster brake
So do I - I've used them for many years.

I'm seeing disc brakes appearing on newer bargain-basement machines, I would guess these will be the first point of failure.



cheapest bikes in Halfords are v's.
next level up is mechanical discs.
hydraulic is a bit pricier and the bargain basement shopper doesn't care or know

Brucey
Posts: 35544
Joined: 4 Jan 2012, 6:25pm

Re: “Dutch” bike brakes

Postby Brucey » 16 Aug 2019, 7:56am

thelawnet wrote:
Brucey wrote:because they go for many years without very much maintenance, and take lots of casual bike parking knocks without so much as a murmur of complaint. For utility riding, disc brakes are a flimsy maintenance-intensive joke by comparison.

cheers


why the comparison with disc brakes? ...


because that is what the OP asked about.

cheers
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~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Brucey~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

thelawnet
Posts: 2199
Joined: 27 Aug 2010, 12:56am

Re: “Dutch” bike brakes

Postby thelawnet » 16 Aug 2019, 11:38am

Brucey wrote:
thelawnet wrote:
Brucey wrote:because they go for many years without very much maintenance, and take lots of casual bike parking knocks without so much as a murmur of complaint. For utility riding, disc brakes are a flimsy maintenance-intensive joke by comparison.

cheers


why the comparison with disc brakes? ...


because that is what the OP asked about.

cheers


so he did. A bit of an odd comparison really as they aren't the simplest or cheapest choice

Brucey
Posts: 35544
Joined: 4 Jan 2012, 6:25pm

Re: “Dutch” bike brakes

Postby Brucey » 16 Aug 2019, 12:01pm

I agree, but a casual acquaintance with the way bikes are pitched/sold over the last few years might suggest

rim brakes = cheap bike
disc brakes = more expensive bike
other brakes = weird bike

I think that way of thinking isn't uncommon.

cheers
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~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Brucey~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

brynpoeth
Posts: 10986
Joined: 30 Nov 2013, 11:26am

Re: “Dutch” bike brakes

Postby brynpoeth » 16 Aug 2019, 6:21pm

Brucey wrote:I agree, but a casual acquaintance with the way bikes are pitched/sold over the last few years might suggest

rim brakes = cheap bike
disc brakes = more expensive bike
other brakes = weird bike

I think that way of thinking isn't uncommon.

cheers

Back-pedal brake: for people with more sense than money :wink:
Entertainer, juvenile, curmudgeon
Cycling-of course, but it is far better on a Gillott
We love safety cameras, we love life

Galloper
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Re: “Dutch” bike brakes

Postby Galloper » 16 Aug 2019, 7:22pm

One of the principle advantage of hub brakes is that they're unaffected by the weather and if you ride all year round as do the majority of riders in many parts of Europe, that's important. Rim brakes can suffer a momentary lag when the rims are wet. Disc brakes are less affected now that the motorbike industry has sorted them out and trickled down the tech to the bike industry.

On an aesthetic note, they also tend to be quieter, a squealing disk or rim brake drives me nuts! :oops:

ratherbeintobago
Posts: 324
Joined: 5 Dec 2010, 6:31pm

Re: “Dutch” bike brakes

Postby ratherbeintobago » 16 Aug 2019, 8:00pm

Galloper wrote:On an aesthetic note, they also tend to be quieter, a squealing disk brake drives me nuts! :oops:


Avids. They howl like dying dogs.

Edit: as a total aside is there any truth in the rumour that IM70 roller brakes can be had with an adaptor for disc-mount forks?

Brucey
Posts: 35544
Joined: 4 Jan 2012, 6:25pm

Re: “Dutch” bike brakes

Postby Brucey » 16 Aug 2019, 9:41pm

ratherbeintobago wrote:
Edit: as a total aside is there any truth in the rumour that IM70 roller brakes can be had with an adaptor for disc-mount forks?


IIRC that is how the Carrera Subway 8 was supplied.

cheers
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