New verb

General cycling advice ( NOT technical ! )
lbomaak2
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New verb

Postby lbomaak2 » 17 Aug 2019, 3:13pm

We are used to brand name becoming verbs; after all, who has never googled? Now in the Cyclopedia section of the latest Cycle magazine, a correspondent says that his wheel "pringled". The meaning is obvious, at least to anyone who has ever seen Pringles. But have I been leading a sheltered life, never having seen this verb before, or will future editions of the Oxford English Dictionary cite the August 2019 edition of Cycle as the first appearance of the verb "pringle"?

tatanab
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Re: New verb

Postby tatanab » 17 Aug 2019, 3:19pm

I first came across that term more than 20 years ago in the USA. Begs the question - was the Pringle snack named after the wheel shape?

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gaz
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Re: New verb

Postby gaz » 17 Aug 2019, 3:21pm

lbomaak2 wrote:But have I been leading a sheltered life, never having seen this verb before, ...

Yes. Pringle first appears as a verb on this forum on 31 Dec 2007.

I suspect it's origins are even older still.
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sizbut
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Re: New verb

Postby sizbut » 17 Aug 2019, 4:44pm

Google Trends is an interesting tool. Allows comparison of how often various words are search for. Sadly only goes back to 2004.

Using 'pringle' as a based line search, "pringled' isn't searched for very often.

Comparing "pringled" and "buckled" - not surprisingly "buckled" is 30 to 40 times more frequently searched for.

Comparing "pringled" and "buckled wheel" does shows "pringled" becoming regularly used since 2010 and on a slowly increasing trend.

Its an interesting word development and I look forward to playing it in Scrabble.

fastpedaller
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Re: New verb

Postby fastpedaller » 17 Aug 2019, 5:18pm

It would appear Pringles have been a snack since 1967

Bmblbzzz
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Re: New verb

Postby Bmblbzzz » 17 Aug 2019, 5:21pm

First recorded by Google ngrams in 1827. Didn't really take off till 1915, so might have originated as military slang.
https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?c ... le%3B%2Cc0

brynpoeth
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Re: New verb

Postby brynpoeth » 17 Aug 2019, 5:23pm

I buy cheap potato crisps

Has anyone ever eaten a pringle? How do they taste? What does the name mean? Maybe they could have been called 'Reginalds'
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Bmblbzzz
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Re: New verb

Postby Bmblbzzz » 17 Aug 2019, 5:24pm

tatanab wrote:I first came across that term more than 20 years ago in the USA. Begs the question - was the Pringle snack named after the wheel shape?

Or after the shape generally; other things, such as records, could also pringle. Certainly the verb and adjective came before the brand name but probably the existence of the snack helped keep the word in the public ear and preserve its non-snack use.

DaveReading
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Re: New verb

Postby DaveReading » 17 Aug 2019, 6:00pm

Bmblbzzz wrote:Certainly the verb and adjective came before the brand name

So more than 50 years ago ? Really ?

Brucey
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Re: New verb

Postby Brucey » 17 Aug 2019, 6:17pm

DaveReading wrote:
Bmblbzzz wrote:Certainly the verb and adjective came before the brand name

So more than 50 years ago ? Really ?


Pringle existed as a word a long time ago; for example Sir Arthur Conan Doyle is said to have used it. However his meaning (which is that still found in most dictionaries) is thought to be close to a composite of prickle and tingle, i.e. not close at all to the more recent meaning in relation to bicycle wheels.

IIRC (I must check this) Brandt used 'pretzel' to describe the shape of failed wheels in his book. The usage of 'pringle' in relation to failed wheels seems to me to be an alternative to the use of the word 'taco' in the same context. If Brandt didn't use either this suggests that both usages may be more recent/commonplace than when he wrote his book.

Proper Tacos are made from Maize flour. Pringles are made from an unholy mixture of wheat and potato, I think.

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nirakaro
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Re: New verb

Postby nirakaro » 17 Aug 2019, 6:27pm

brynpoeth wrote: How do they taste?

Personally, I think they taste horrible. Yet strangely, whenever I eat one, I find myself wanting another. And another. And another. That's a genius piece of product design.

brynpoeth
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Re: New verb

Postby brynpoeth » 17 Aug 2019, 6:28pm

Is the Gazette so far out of date that it has just noticed this old word?
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scottg
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Re: New verb

Postby scottg » 17 Aug 2019, 9:26pm

Never heard term pringled used for a taco'd wheel. :)
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drossall
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Re: New verb

Postby drossall » 17 Aug 2019, 9:32pm

Yes, I've used and heard the term pringled wheels a few times over the years. Not particularly new.

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Graham
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Re: New verb

Postby Graham » 17 Aug 2019, 9:35pm

" . . . . segway into . . . . . "

Now I've expressed that ugly psuedo-verb, I cannot use my blood pressure tester for several hours. < rude acronym deleted >.