sweating

General cycling advice ( NOT technical ! )
Tangled Metal
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Re: sweating

Postby Tangled Metal » 26 Nov 2019, 10:41pm

mattsccm wrote:Warm when I leave/ I just sweat a lot and get wet.

Try starting a little cold, not full on shivering just before that then warm up on your ride. Sweat is because you're too hot. Take off a layer or don't wear so much from the start. With a few rides you'll work out what clothing system works for a few conditions.

drossall
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Re: sweating

Postby drossall » 26 Nov 2019, 10:53pm

And several thin layers give more temperature control options than one thick one. Although, since it's the air trapped between layers that does the insulating, you may find that you have too many trapped air layers :roll:

Smudgerii
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Re: sweating

Postby Smudgerii » 27 Nov 2019, 8:12am

Advice I was given was. Dress for the 2nd 10k not for the 1st

Hope that makes sense

Tangled Metal
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Re: sweating

Postby Tangled Metal » 27 Nov 2019, 8:16am

Get a string vest. Works well for insulation and not holding sweat. I'm talking scandi style brynja mesh in synthetic fabrics not the rab c Nesbitt version.

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Tigerbiten
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Re: sweating

Postby Tigerbiten » 27 Nov 2019, 10:46am

The trick I use on long rides in very cold dry weather is to put my windproof/waterproof layer in the middle.
This way a thin inner layer will get damp with sweat while the thicker outer layer stays dry.
As daft as it sounds, I stay warmer in the long run.

YMMV ........ :D

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andrew_s
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Re: sweating

Postby andrew_s » 27 Nov 2019, 12:27pm

slowster wrote:Currently I reckon the best base layers for aerobic activity are Brynje Super Thermo mesh. If you have a rubbish synthetic baselayer or a merino one which you don't use because of how it feels, try wearing them under a Brynje mesh base layer. The mesh will hold the other baselayer's fabric away from your skin, so it doesn't matter if it's sodden, clammy or itchy, and a close fitting second base layer will help to trap air in the mesh gaps (and it's air that insulates, not the fabric, so you want to stop warm air moving away from your skin and being replaced by colder air).

My preferred base layer is Brynje Super Thermo too
However, I think a second baselayer has to be worn over the top of Brynje mesh, not under it.

I usually use a close fitting regular jersey over the top, for the longer zip. Unzipping outer layers to cool off is more effective with mesh than other base layers


Tigerbiten wrote:The trick I use on long rides in very cold dry weather is to put my windproof/waterproof layer in the middle.
This way a thin inner layer will get damp with sweat while the thicker outer layer stays dry.
As daft as it sounds, I stay warmer in the long run.

That's a common trick used in polar climates, particularly to stop sweat condensing in the down of your sleeping bag. Look up "vapor barrier liner"

cyclop
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Re: sweating

Postby cyclop » 27 Nov 2019, 12:57pm

Tigerbiten wrote:The trick I use on long rides in very cold dry weather is to put my windproof/waterproof layer in the middle.
This way a thin inner layer will get damp with sweat while the thicker outer layer stays dry.
As daft as it sounds, I stay warmer in the long run.

YMMV ........ :D

Interesting solution which I will try,along with other ideas.Have ordered a string vest.Went out today,sunny,light breeze,8degrees so not cold.Gilet plus lowe alpine polartec100 layer and a deliberately easy pace.No soaking wet base so will work from that point onwards.Cheers everyone for the input.

mattheus
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Re: sweating

Postby mattheus » 27 Nov 2019, 1:10pm

andrew_s wrote:
Tigerbiten wrote:The trick I use on long rides in very cold dry weather is to put my windproof/waterproof layer in the middle.
This way a thin inner layer will get damp with sweat while the thicker outer layer stays dry.
As daft as it sounds, I stay warmer in the long run.

That's a common trick used in polar climates, particularly to stop sweat condensing in the down of your sleeping bag. Look up "vapor barrier liner"


Oh wow - that has really messed with my head! Will have to think about this one ...

[Does this mean that a VPL - sorry, I mean VBL - would be even better worn next to the skin? Wrap yourself in clingfilm?? ]

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freiston
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Re: sweating

Postby freiston » 27 Nov 2019, 1:45pm

Bonefishblues wrote:Perhaps drop a line to Prince Andrew for advice?













Too soon?


Too soon - meaning that you beat me to it! :wink: :lol:
Disclaimer: Treat what I say with caution and if possible, wait for someone with more knowledge and experience to contribute. ;)

Tangled Metal
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Re: sweating

Postby Tangled Metal » 27 Nov 2019, 2:41pm

Three vapour barrier is usually worn next to skin but a thin base layer might be preferred. They work by keeping your skin at it's ideal moisture level such that the sweating is reduced. This is based on not sweating for exertion or overheating. Your body sweats in this state to maintain moisture levels to best suit the skin. Of course if you're sweating due to exertion or overheating then it's not ideal. It's basically non- breathable waterproof clothing.

It doesn't just make sense for serious cold. There's people sleeping in it in Scottish winter in 3 season bags for example. By preventing your sweat reaching the insulation layer the insulation layer can work more efficiently hence lighter weight kit can be used. VBLs are really you're province of experienced outdoors types. ULers with experience.

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Re: sweating

Postby Vorpal » 27 Nov 2019, 3:36pm

mattheus wrote:
andrew_s wrote:
Tigerbiten wrote:The trick I use on long rides in very cold dry weather is to put my windproof/waterproof layer in the middle.
This way a thin inner layer will get damp with sweat while the thicker outer layer stays dry.
As daft as it sounds, I stay warmer in the long run.

That's a common trick used in polar climates, particularly to stop sweat condensing in the down of your sleeping bag. Look up "vapor barrier liner"


Oh wow - that has really messed with my head! Will have to think about this one ...

[Does this mean that a VPL - sorry, I mean VBL - would be even better worn next to the skin? Wrap yourself in clingfilm?? ]


I guess the link quoted explains how it works for polar expeditions & stuff.

The way it works for cold & wet is that the vapour barrier prevents the wet-on-the-inside from coming into contact with a cold external barrier. A layer on the outside provides insulation to the vapour barrier and reduces condensation. The layer on the inside wicks sweat away. I learned to do that when I was working outdoors in work issued clothes, which were either insulating or waterproof (boil in the bag variety), but never both. I wore my own base layer(s) with the work waterproof over it, with the work warm jacket over that.

But honestly, I'd rather have Goretex or something that is, at least theoretically, waterproof & breathable as my outer layer. It doesn't keep me from soaking my base layer with sweat, but it's rather more comfortable, nonetheless. I suppose it because I get less condensation.
“In some ways, it is easier to be a dissident, for then one is without responsibility.”
― Nelson Mandela, Long Walk to Freedom

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freiston
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Re: sweating

Postby freiston » 27 Nov 2019, 3:46pm

I sweat a lot too. For cold (dryish) weather, I have an oldish winter cycling jacket from Aldi (Crane brand); It is windproof on the arms and the front of the torso but on the back it is smooth on the outside, slightly fleecy on the inside and extremely breathable (it's like it's not there when I hold it over my mouth and breath through it [my preferred test-method of breathability]). I wear a Decathlon long sleeved t-shirt (Quechua brand) underneath that has a high neck and a 10" zip. It too is smooth on the outside and fleecy on the inside but has mesh sections around the armpits. Either under or over the jacket, I might wear a Decathlon gilet (only £20). I can regulate temperature with up to three front zips. I usually find that with this combination and with removing/adding the gilet as required, I can regulate my temperature and my sweat will evaporate enough to keep comfortable. If it gets really cold, I can add another layer (usually an Altura Varium waterproof softshell with pit zips) and/or I will substitute one of the layers with a warmer layer. If it's raining enough to have to do something about it, I will use either the Altura Varium or a full cape.
Disclaimer: Treat what I say with caution and if possible, wait for someone with more knowledge and experience to contribute. ;)

fullupandslowingdown
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Re: sweating

Postby fullupandslowingdown » 15 Dec 2019, 3:40pm

I'm a thinking... Would a greater percentage of people who have difficulty keeping warm without sweating also suffer more than the average person from cold hands???
What I'm wondering is this: Cold hand syndrome is generally related to poor peripheral circulation whereby the blood supply to the hands is prematurely reduced. Hewman bodies are a bit poorly engineered IMHO and if the heat is being prematurely retained and shunted to the core, then this leads to a massive over heating in the active person hence sweating whilst still frozen clawed.
Maybe cyclists are even more prone to peripheral circulatory problems because we tend to put weight on our hands over a period of time leading to reduced nerve feeling (do recumbent cyclists suffer from a cold bum? )
I used to use the newspaper trick for one commute I used to do. More or less straight down a fast hill minutes after leaving home at 6.30amish and then having another hill to climb 5 minutes later. I think no technical clothing could balance my thermics with that range change.
Or as another poster said; maybe some of us are just wired differently. Once really warmed up I can wear just a T on top and still be warm to sweaty when racing around in winter conditions. The ex used to tease me how she could run in the heat of summer and never break sweat.

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Tigerbiten
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Re: sweating

Postby Tigerbiten » 15 Dec 2019, 4:05pm

Being in the recumbent position means your feet are higher than when your on an upwrong.
This reduces the blood pressure in them and hence reduces the blood flow.
So in winter they can freeze and summer the soles can burn.

Easy ........... :D

tim-b
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Re: sweating

Postby tim-b » 15 Dec 2019, 4:25pm

Hi
For me the trick with a windproof is to have the windproof panels forward facing and roubaix fleece panels facing rearward. Windproof all-over and I'm boiled-in-a-bag. Here are a couple of examples:
https://www.polaris-bikewear.co.uk/Windshear-Windproof-Road-Cycling-Jacket-p/pol01-6146-p.htm
https://www.decathlon.co.uk/rc-100-winter-road-cycling-jacket-yellow-id_8406498.html
Today (3C) I wore cycling shorts, roubaix bottoms and roubaix jacket, both with windproof fronts, long-sleeve thermal vest, long sleeve mid-layer (a second thermal vest would do) & windproof gloves, hat and buff. Two or three hours riding was fine, but my toes and finger ends were getting chilly. 0C and I'll add thermal leggings too.
Regards
tim-b
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