Repurposing old bike parts

General cycling advice ( NOT technical ! )
gregoryoftours
Posts: 1231
Joined: 22 May 2011, 7:14pm

Re: Repurposing old bike parts

Postby gregoryoftours » 27 Jul 2020, 10:53pm

Mr Evil wrote:Image
The tubes are hung from a right crank.

Is that a Kooka crank?

tim-b
Posts: 1419
Joined: 10 Oct 2009, 8:20am

Re: Repurposing old bike parts

Postby tim-b » 28 Jul 2020, 7:07am

Mr Evil wrote:If you do a lot of cycling, you're bound to end up with a lot of parts that aren't suitable for reuse, but it seems wasteful to throw them away. Inner tubes are a common one. I have used a few of those for suspending hard drives, to damp their vibrations and quiet them, like this:
Image
That's not something I am able to do as much anymore, now that hard drives are becoming obsolete.

Something to do with a disk break?
Regards
tim-b
~~~~¯\(ツ)/¯~~~~

Mr Evil
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Re: Repurposing old bike parts

Postby Mr Evil » 28 Jul 2020, 10:07am

gregoryoftours wrote:Is that a Kooka crank?

No, it's an ax-lightness crank. Too new to use for this really, but it's the only one I had spare.

Cyckelgalen
Posts: 80
Joined: 21 Sep 2018, 11:29am

Re: Repurposing old bike parts

Postby Cyckelgalen » 28 Jul 2020, 3:11pm

Rather than bike parts, I'd like to repurpose a whole bike to power a manual water pump of some sort to water my garden from a nearby pond. Last time I looked into it I didn't find any suitable affordable pump, only a rather costly commercially produced pump that had been developed as an aid to subsistence agriculture in the third world.
Any better ideas?

Brucey
Posts: 39778
Joined: 4 Jan 2012, 6:25pm

Re: Repurposing old bike parts

Postby Brucey » 28 Jul 2020, 3:17pm

Cyckelgalen wrote:Rather than bike parts, I'd like to repurpose a whole bike to power a manual water pump of some sort to water my garden from a nearby pond. Last time I looked into it I didn't find any suitable affordable pump, only a rather costly commercially produced pump that had been developed as an aid to subsistence agriculture in the third world.
Any better ideas?


you can get small pumps that are meant to mount to electric drills. You would need to gear up massively to get the correct spindle speed though. There may also be problems with self-priming (or to be exact not)) as well.

Mad thought; could you make a pedal powered Archimedes screw?

cheers
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~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Brucey~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Cyckelgalen
Posts: 80
Joined: 21 Sep 2018, 11:29am

Re: Repurposing old bike parts

Postby Cyckelgalen » 29 Jul 2020, 10:58am

Hi Brucey,
I ruled out the small pumps mounted on drills because of their very limited flow. I would need to use a pipe/hose of one or two inches diameter to fill a reservoir of around 1000 litres. Those little pumps are not up to the task, if would take ages and they wouldn't last long pumping regularly such an amount of water.
The Archimedes screw is a nice idea, but complex to make. The ones I have seen are designed to move grain, pellets etc and not watertight. Mi best best is probably sourcing a car engine waterpump with a pulley. Most pumps are integrated in the engine somehow but I hope to find one that can be detached from an old scrap engine and is operational as an independent unit.
I miss the days when you could just roam at scrapyards freely and scavenge for parts!

Mr Evil
Posts: 192
Joined: 21 Feb 2016, 11:42pm
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Re: Repurposing old bike parts

Postby Mr Evil » 29 Jul 2020, 11:10am

Cyckelgalen wrote:Rather than bike parts, I'd like to repurpose a whole bike to power a manual water pump of some sort to water my garden from a nearby pond. Last time I looked into it I didn't find any suitable affordable pump, only a rather costly commercially produced pump that had been developed as an aid to subsistence agriculture in the third world.
Any better ideas?

How about attaching the bike to a generator, and using an electric pump? There would be a loss of efficiency in the mechanical->electric->mechanical conversion, but you would gain a wider choice of pumps.