Carbon forks on my Croix de Fer

General cycling advice ( NOT technical ! )
Cyril Haearn
Posts: 12360
Joined: 30 Nov 2013, 11:26am
Location: Between the woods and the water

Re: Carbon forks on my Croix de Fer

Postby Cyril Haearn » 23 Dec 2019, 9:34pm

£349?
Enough to buy two complete cycles
Nice one Cyrille, nice one son..
Cycling-of course, but it is far better on 49" fixed
We love safety cameras, we love life "1330"

User avatar
The utility cyclist
Posts: 2945
Joined: 22 Aug 2016, 12:28pm
Location: The first garden city

Re: Carbon forks on my Croix de Fer

Postby The utility cyclist » 25 Dec 2019, 11:25pm

Brucey wrote:forks that bend before they break are absorbing energy. Forks that snap like a carrot (at high load or not) are not absorbing energy in the same way.

https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=broken+carbon+forks&FORM=HDRSC2

Safer? Not convinced. I'm also not convinced that the quality is always there in a typical manufacturing environment.

For example I don't think there is a single big bike maker that hasn't been forced to institute a recall on carbon forks that were shown to be unsafe.

The clincher for me is the failure mode; steel frame parts sometimes crack, then usually, the crack grows until the part is floppy, and you stop riding the bike before it actually breaks catastrophically. Other materials don't fail in quite the same way and (I think) are more likely to catch you out when they go.

cheers

Steel forks bend a lot and then snap/bend beyond the capability to spring back a lot more than carbon forks.
You're not convinced and yet we know that good carbon forks are stronger in most impacts and will fail less than good steel forks,
Higher standards in production and safety will induce more recalls, steel forks were for the most part garbage and would flake/fold in crashes that a carbon fork would survive and be completely fine.

< SNIP - completely unnecessary personal sniping deleted : Graham : Please learn the lesson. >

Des49
Posts: 668
Joined: 2 Dec 2014, 11:45am

Re: Carbon forks on my Croix de Fer

Postby Des49 » 26 Dec 2019, 12:29am

The utility cyclist wrote:Steel forks bend a lot and then snap/bend beyond the capability to spring back a lot more than carbon forks.
You're not convinced and yet we know that good carbon forks are stronger in most impacts and will fail less than good steel forks,
Higher standards in production and safety will induce more recalls, steel forks were for the most part garbage and would flake/fold in crashes that a carbon fork would survive and be completely fine.


If a crash will cause a steel fork to "flake" then certainly I would not ride a carbon fork that had sustained the same crash even if there is no visible damage.
I am still riding steel forks that are over 30 years old with full confidence, even if the bikes involved have had the odd crash.
Steel is generally predictable, I have broken a few steel frames over a few decades, all have given warning with a few creaks and wobbles, even allowing me to continue to ride carefully when failure was obvious. A carbon component is likely to suffer failure without much notice.

< SNIP of quotation. . . in view of my editing of the source post >

soapbox
Posts: 75
Joined: 27 Jun 2009, 12:20am

Re: Carbon forks on my Croix de Fer

Postby soapbox » 26 Dec 2019, 10:15am

The utility cyclist wrote:Oh, one other thing, carbon forks are stronger than the vast majority of even modern steel forks, less likely to fold or break in most impacts/incidents...


That simply isn't true.