New bike. Help

General cycling advice ( NOT technical ! )
RuiJG
Posts: 3
Joined: 20 Jun 2020, 10:07am

New bike. Help

Postby RuiJG » 20 Jun 2020, 10:27am

Hi guys. Need help to choose new bike

Ive decided to ditch the car and commute by bike.
Its about 4.6 miles ride on road, most in good condition.

Eventually i would like to use this bike for more than just commute, maybe some 30/50 miles on road rides with some friends.

The catch... needs to be through r2w scheme in evans cycles.

Budget £1500

After some search i found the
Pinnacle Arkose D3 2020 Gravel

Seems to have good reviews and good specs, but im no expert in bicycles.

Open to suggestions.
Last edited by RuiJG on 20 Jun 2020, 10:56am, edited 1 time in total.

mattsccm
Posts: 3233
Joined: 28 Nov 2009, 9:44pm

Re: New bike. Help

Postby mattsccm » 20 Jun 2020, 10:42am

They are popular in gravel circles. :D Good value. Other big and online suppliers can off much the same. Decathlon, Planet X, Ribble to name a few.
Check delivery date. Evans have been shocking due to increased demand but so have others.

RuiJG
Posts: 3
Joined: 20 Jun 2020, 10:07am

Re: New bike. Help

Postby RuiJG » 20 Jun 2020, 3:10pm

Would a change of tyres help perform better on road, ive read a few reviews that the tyres are very prone to get punctures so i was thinking of maybe changing the tyres to tubeless

https://www.evanscycles.com/continental ... e-EV357775

Would these be a good match? Or a bit too much?

tim-b
Posts: 1389
Joined: 10 Oct 2009, 8:20am

Re: New bike. Help

Postby tim-b » 21 Jun 2020, 6:04am

Hi
You'd be better to stick around the same tyre size; the 5000s have a max width of 32mm v the WTBs at 45mm. This means a loss in volume and so higher tyre pressures will be needed with a loss in comfort. I'd stick with the standard tyres and ask Evans to set the bike up as tubeless (it seems to be tubeless-ready on the OEM rims and tyres). The likelihood of a puncture causing a delay will be hugely reduced and you can still carry a spare inner tube and tyre boot to get you home with the more serious problems. Always hunt around for tyre prices, you can often find Contis discounted
Regards
tim-b
~~~~¯\(ツ)/¯~~~~

bikerider
Posts: 52
Joined: 30 Jan 2010, 9:44pm

Re: New bike. Help

Postby bikerider » 22 Jun 2020, 6:05pm

That is reasonable budget to spend on a good idea but possibly ending up gathering dust in the garage six months from now.
I suggest you save the larger part of that money for a later time. The first bike you buy will not be your first choice in a few months.
I suggest you concentrate on getting fit commuting twelve miles a day and
gradually increase your mileage by taking the long way home with a little extra mileage
perhaps at weekends.
after a few weeks you will know if you are going to stick with it or return to the car a frost
or rainfall may end this good idea.
For cycling in varying weather conditions you will need a bike that takes mudguards and a rack
for carrying spare clothes etc. Do ensure the bike takes a full mudguard and not those flimsy clip
on things that rattle and bend and eventually you get fed up with them.
there are lots of suitable bikes new and second hand for commuting.
During your getting fit period building up to fifty miles look around bikes that others ride confirm
it's road riding you want to do.Now go spend the rest of your budget and perhaps a bit more knowing what you want.
No cyclist has just one bike and you do not want to ride your pride and joy to work.

RuiJG
Posts: 3
Joined: 20 Jun 2020, 10:07am

Re: New bike. Help

Postby RuiJG » 28 Jun 2020, 9:29pm

bikerider wrote:That is reasonable budget to spend on a good idea but possibly ending up gathering dust in the garage six months from now.
I suggest you save the larger part of that money for a later time. The first bike you buy will not be your first choice in a few months.
I suggest you concentrate on getting fit commuting twelve miles a day and
gradually increase your mileage by taking the long way home with a little extra mileage
perhaps at weekends.
after a few weeks you will know if you are going to stick with it or return to the car a frost
or rainfall may end this good idea.
For cycling in varying weather conditions you will need a bike that takes mudguards and a rack
for carrying spare clothes etc. Do ensure the bike takes a full mudguard and not those flimsy clip
on things that rattle and bend and eventually you get fed up with them.
there are lots of suitable bikes new and second hand for commuting.
During your getting fit period building up to fifty miles look around bikes that others ride confirm
it's road riding you want to do.Now go spend the rest of your budget and perhaps a bit more knowing what you want.
No cyclist has just one bike and you do not want to ride your pride and joy to work.


I took your advice and got myself a second hand Charge Zester 2013 Hybrid

Bike Specs:

Frame
frame material Aluminium Double Butted
frame description Alloy, double butted tubing

Braking
brake caliper front Avid Elixir 1, 160mm
brake caliper rear Avid Elixir 1, 160mm
brake levers Avid Elixir 1

Drive
bottom bracket FSA powerdrive
bottom bracket drop / height 68mm
bottom bracket shell diameter 68mm
cassette (rear cogs) SRAM PG 1030 11-32t
chain YBN S10 CR
crank FSA Vero Compact, 46/36t powerdrive
pedals Wellgo Alloy trekking

Gearing
derailleur clamp size front 31.8mm
derailleur front SRAM Apex
derailleur rear SRAM Apex 10/s
gears 20
shifter(s) SRAM SL700 Flatbar 10/s

General
grips Charge Griddle lock-on
handlebar Shield Urban low riser, Double butted, 680mm wide
headset FSA No.8, Integrated
rigid forks Alloy 700c, Straight blade, Disc
saddle Charge Spoon
seat post Shield, 15 layback
seat release / collar Shield, bolt type
seat release / collar diameter 34.9mm
seatpost diameter 31.8mm
stem Shield, 31.8mm

Wheels
hub front SRAM Via GT, 32h
hub rear SRAM Via GT, 32h
rims WTB SX19, double wall
tire front Continental Contact 700x32c
tire rear Continental Contact 700x32c
wheel size 700C


The only thing i think was changed in the bike was the tyres, from 32 to 28

Is there anything anyone thinks would worth be changed to improve the bike?

mattsccm
Posts: 3233
Joined: 28 Nov 2009, 9:44pm

Re: New bike. Help

Postby mattsccm » 28 Jun 2020, 9:39pm

I would leave it as it is for a bit. Those Contacts are not bad tyres. Just dropping a size isn't the universal answer if you wnt more speed. Good quality tyres are more important.

bikerider
Posts: 52
Joined: 30 Jan 2010, 9:44pm

Re: New bike. Help

Postby bikerider » 30 Jun 2020, 10:38am

That is a very good first bike with a decent spec for your commute. As Matt says, no need to make any improvements to the bike – just ride it. Your first complaint may be the saddle being uncomfortable. They all are and will be until your bum and legs have become accustomed to it.

Once you are riding the bike confidently, the first change to consider are the pedals. Clip-ins are a positive improvement and you will eventually pull up as well as push down. Road bike shoes are light and stiff but walking in them is not easy with your feet at funny angles. Mountain bike pedals (google 'SPD') are my choice and a lot of road cyclists use them. Shimano PDM520 are cheaper than most, decent quality, efficient and last forever and you can walk normally in the shoes.

Hopefully your commute is a nice and easy flat ride. But to build cycling strength and fitness for your target 50-mile rides, you must seek out hills and conquer the aches that go with them and slowly increase your mileage. You must be relentless and determined and it will eventually get easy.

Just get through those first few weeks – some of the hardest cycling you will ever do and your bike won’t be gathering dust this winter.