Pricing a bike for sale

General cycling advice ( NOT technical ! )
puffin
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Pricing a bike for sale

Postby puffin » 29 Dec 2020, 11:56pm

I need to get from N+1 to N, which means selling one of my touring bikes. I'll post it on the Bikes For Sale Forum, but I don't know how to price it or what needs to be in the description. I can't see a similar one for sale anywhere else

Its a Spa Tourer (725) with a hub dynamo and lights. Its done LEJOG four times so there's not much of the original drive / wheels left, the main exception being the original front wheel. The good news is its been regularly serviced on a service plan, the bad news is its with Halfords (that's a bit harsh, they have done a great job).

I've attached a photo which is about 2 years old, but shows the model.

Has anyone got experience of a guide price I should offer it at, and what needs to be in the description?
Image Attachments
20180530_132646.jpg

pwa
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Re: Pricing a bike for sale

Postby pwa » 30 Dec 2020, 6:50am

You can ask any price you like, but if you want to sell it easily you will have to ask a price that might seem disappointing compared to what you have spent on it. Maybe a third of the cost of a new bike, assuming all is in good order.

List all the major parts. Frame and forks (what size?), cranks and cassette. How many teeth on the chain rings and the largest rear sprocket? Front and rear derailleurs, brake levers, gear levers (if they are not combined), wheel components, saddle, guards, rack...... The more you list, the better. Also worth saying what size of rider it might suit. Also comment on any imperfections in the paint.

I wonder if you might be better off hanging on for a while, as it has seemed to me that second hand tourers aren't shifting very well at the moment. Maybe when spring is a bit nearer some people might start thinking about what they want to do when the weather picks up...

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martin biggs
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Re: Pricing a bike for sale

Postby martin biggs » 30 Dec 2020, 8:09am

One thing for sure they are good bikes with a good following .
I would love another one at some point .
Make sure you list components , size , any knocks or bruises along with a good selection of pictures showing the good and bad points and include your location in advert as that helps.
As for price you will have a figure in your mind so try and aim for that .

yostumpy
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Re: Pricing a bike for sale

Postby yostumpy » 30 Dec 2020, 8:23am

£600

PH
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Re: Pricing a bike for sale

Postby PH » 30 Dec 2020, 8:44am

I'd advertise at around 60% of what that spec would cost new and accept that I might have to take a lower offer.
In part it depends on other things than the bike - if you'll post, where you are, time of year, how long you'll wait for the right buyer, where you sell it.
As said above it's a well known model with good reviews, against that is the popularity of disc brakes with many looking for a new tourer.

I have a similar Hewitt Cheviot, a lot older but resprayed and immaculate. There was no interest when I tried to get a reasonable price for it a few years ago, just a couple of very low offers. I've kept it, re-built to be different to my other bikes, and although it's my least used, I'm getting more value than the price it would have sold for (It's also occupying a space that I might otherwise fill with a new bike, so saving me money!)

Good luck

simonhill
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Re: Pricing a bike for sale

Postby simonhill » 30 Dec 2020, 9:17am

You obviously know a bit about bikes so.....

Sit down and think what would you want to know if buying a bike. Write down then read and reread. This will pretty much be what has been listed above, but you may think of a bit more.

Be brief without too much subjective stuff when describing bike and bits. An idea of condition and potential longevity would help purchaser to work out future expenses.

A brief separate 'what it's done' para is useful, but don't over egg it.

I've no idea of price, but again think as if you are buying. How much discount from new would you want for old, worn and dated components.

mikeymo
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Re: Pricing a bike for sale

Postby mikeymo » 30 Dec 2020, 10:20am

IF the frame is in good nick (and there have been complaints about Spa paint being "soft"), then maybe a little more than the price of a new Spa frame.

Look at it from the point of view of the buyer, especially if they are on this forum:

Things they are getting:

1. Good frame, with touring geometry, from respected outlet.
2. Some other components, with a fair bit of wear, "serviced" by major chain to some standard or other.

Things they aren't getting:

1. A guarantee.
2. The components they actually want.

Most people, especially here, may well have most/many/some of the "bits". And in fact may prefer the bits they've got in the shed to the ones attached to your bike.

Of course if somebody is looking for their first bike, or their first touring bike, and it's their size, it might be just the thing.
Last edited by mikeymo on 30 Dec 2020, 11:55am, edited 1 time in total.

Bonefishblues
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Re: Pricing a bike for sale

Postby Bonefishblues » 30 Dec 2020, 10:23am

pwa wrote:You can ask any price you like, but if you want to sell it easily you will have to ask a price that might seem disappointing compared to what you have spent on it. Maybe a third of the cost of a new bike, assuming all is in good order.

List all the major parts. Frame and forks (what size?), cranks and cassette. How many teeth on the chain rings and the largest rear sprocket? Front and rear derailleurs, brake levers, gear levers (if they are not combined), wheel components, saddle, guards, rack...... The more you list, the better. Also worth saying what size of rider it might suit. Also comment on any imperfections in the paint.

I wonder if you might be better off hanging on for a while, as it has seemed to me that second hand tourers aren't shifting very well at the moment. Maybe when spring is a bit nearer some people might start thinking about what they want to do when the weather picks up...

That first sentence of the first post nails it pretty well.

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squeaker
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Re: Pricing a bike for sale

Postby squeaker » 30 Dec 2020, 11:16am

Bonefishblues wrote:
pwa wrote:You can ask any price you like, but if you want to sell it easily you will have to ask a price that might seem disappointing compared to what you have spent on it. Maybe a third of the cost of a new bike, assuming all is in good order....


That first sentence of the first post nails it pretty well.
I'd agree with that, and of course your asking price will depend on your willingness to accept a lower offer...
"42"

puffin
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Re: Pricing a bike for sale

Postby puffin » 30 Dec 2020, 11:20am

Huge thanks as always for the advice, this is what I like and appreciate so much about the CTC forums. I have taken it on board, and PWA's advice to hold off till nearer the spring both makes sense and appeals to my sense of procrastination. I'll put it off for a while but will use all the advice to prepare a fully informative advert. For a start I'll make the title "Spa Tourer 57cm Buckinghamshire £:whatever"

I counted the cogs on the back (stuck a bit of blutac to a tooth to help me count) and I will now try to identify the other parts...though you do know I'll probably be showing you photographs and asking again for help.

Thanks again and keep safe.

puffin
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Re: Pricing a bike for sale

Postby puffin » 30 Dec 2020, 11:25am

simonhill wrote:You obviously know a bit about bikes so.....



You are very kind, but despite how much I big myself up as a LEJOG'er, I am still useless with bikes. I have never changed a puncture on the road, never managed to adjust the brakes by using the twisting threads, have never successfully adjusted my gears. A year ago I went on a 2 day cycle maintenance course, it was way over my head (truing up wheels etc). I don't take any pride in my lack of ability, and have sworn to book a learning session with my local independent bike mechanic.

PH
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Re: Pricing a bike for sale

Postby PH » 30 Dec 2020, 11:41am

puffin wrote:I'll put it off for a while but will use all the advice to prepare a fully informative advert. For a start I'll make the title "Spa Tourer 57cm Buckinghamshire £:whatever"

While I agree that you're more likely to find a buyer in the Spring, there seems little harm in advertising it now and re-advertising in a couple of months if it doesn't sell. You only need one buyer, and the participants of this forum come and go, for example someone may be planning an E2E, pop in with a couple of questions and never be seen again, that happens any time of year.
That you're not in a hurry to sell, does IMO greatly increase your chances of finding the right buyer, don't leave it till there's some reason you have to sell quickly.

De Sisti
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Re: Pricing a bike for sale

Postby De Sisti » 30 Dec 2020, 1:19pm

puffin wrote:A year ago I went on a 2 day cycle maintenance course,

Where did it take place and how much did it cost?

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horizon
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Re: Pricing a bike for sale

Postby horizon » 30 Dec 2020, 3:36pm

Bonefishblues wrote:
pwa wrote:You can ask any price you like, but if you want to sell it easily you will have to ask a price that might seem disappointing compared to what you have spent on it. Maybe a third of the cost of a new bike, assuming all is in good order.


That first sentence of the first post nails it pretty well.


+ 1 ! Good bikes seem to go for a song (until it's the one you want of course... :mrgreen: )

Points in favour:

1. What looks like an uncut steerer.
2. STIs, albeit with cantilever brakes I presume.
3. The frame is either 54 or 57 which means it suits its target market (averagely tall blokes).
4. Brooks saddle
5. Original owner with sales receipt (you can photo this)
6. Service history.
7. Vendor of good standing :wink:
8. Low mileage
9. Nice looking bike (colour may or may not be significant).
10. Bike has a good name in a niche market.
11. Hub dynamo
12. Rack

It helps to:

1. As others have said, do your research and put it all out there.
2. Take really good photos in good light, preferably on a sunny day.
3. Be prepared to post (at buyer's expense).

You might find that lack of disc brakes is a drawback, you might not. Generally though, as others have said, it is a buyer's market.
When the pestilence strikes from the East, go far and breathe the cold air deeply. Ignore the sage, stay not indoors. Ho Ri Zon 12th Century Chinese philosopher

wjhall
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Re: Pricing a bike for sale

Postby wjhall » 30 Dec 2020, 4:27pm

Given that a buyer cannot know the fatigue or corrosion status of the frame, and the consumption of the original drive components suggests that a good part of the nominal frame life could have been consumed, you could try starting the whole assembly at GBP 200 DDP* up to 200 km.

*Delivered Duty Paid