Pricing a bike for sale

General cycling advice ( NOT technical ! )
Bonefishblues
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Location: Near Bicester Oxon

Re: Pricing a bike for sale

Postby Bonefishblues » 30 Dec 2020, 4:34pm

It's a steel frame. Its life wouldn't trouble me at all, assuming it's corrosion-free, unless I'm misunderstanding the properties of steel frames.

mikeymo
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Joined: 27 Sep 2016, 6:23pm

Re: Pricing a bike for sale

Postby mikeymo » 30 Dec 2020, 6:50pm

wjhall wrote:Given that a buyer cannot know the fatigue or corrosion status of the frame, and the consumption of the original drive components suggests that a good part of the nominal frame life could have been consumed, you could try starting the whole assembly at GBP 200 DDP* up to 200 km.

*Delivered Duty Paid


I've forgotten. Remind me, what is the nominal frame life of a Reynolds 725 frame?

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SimonCelsa
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Re: Pricing a bike for sale

Postby SimonCelsa » 30 Dec 2020, 7:33pm

I think a realistic price to sell would be in the region of £350.

A good solid practical machine but most people want the latest 'tech'.

I hope you achieve a better price.

markjohnobrien
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Joined: 4 Oct 2007, 8:15pm

Re: Pricing a bike for sale

Postby markjohnobrien » 30 Dec 2020, 7:50pm

SimonCelsa wrote:I think a realistic price to sell would be in the region of £350.

A good solid practical machine but most people want the latest 'tech'.

I hope you achieve a better price.


I agree.

I once sold a mint Roberts Roughstuff - Campagnolo Chorus- Shimergoed- and after being for sale for ages, the best offer was £550 for a bike that would have cost at least £2-2.5k new.

Unfortunately, bikes depreciate in value which is great for the buyer but no so good for the seller.

Jamesh
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Re: Pricing a bike for sale

Postby Jamesh » 30 Dec 2020, 11:11pm

mikeymo wrote:
wjhall wrote:Given that a buyer cannot know the fatigue or corrosion status of the frame, and the consumption of the original drive components suggests that a good part of the nominal frame life could have been consumed, you could try starting the whole assembly at GBP 200 DDP* up to 200 km.

*Delivered Duty Paid


I've forgotten. Remind me, what is the nominal frame life of a Reynolds 725 frame?



Steel dosen't generally have a frame life unless

A) it's been damages by a crash.
B) it's been corroded by salt / wet weather
C) there is a stress riser in the frame causing a crack to develop.

I'd put steel above titanium CF and lastly Alu for frame durability.

Others might have different views

Cheers James

scottg
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Location: Highland Heights Kentucky,, USA

Re: Pricing a bike for sale

Postby scottg » 31 Dec 2020, 12:11am

Bikes with parts on them, go for little more than bike without parts.

If the bike was English and pre-1960, then it would be interesting to
the 'Bloody Bike Anoraks', the VCC or CR types.

If you have Grandad's Granby Taper Tube, with original paint,
packed in cosmoline in your shed, 23.5 to 24in let me know. :)
+++++++++++++++++++++++++
Deutsche Luftschiffahrts-AG
+++++++++++++++++++++++++

mikeymo
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Joined: 27 Sep 2016, 6:23pm

Re: Pricing a bike for sale

Postby mikeymo » 31 Dec 2020, 8:43am

Jamesh wrote:
mikeymo wrote:
wjhall wrote:Given that a buyer cannot know the fatigue or corrosion status of the frame, and the consumption of the original drive components suggests that a good part of the nominal frame life could have been consumed, you could try starting the whole assembly at GBP 200 DDP* up to 200 km.

*Delivered Duty Paid


I've forgotten. Remind me, what is the nominal frame life of a Reynolds 725 frame?



Steel dosen't generally have a frame life unless

A) it's been damages by a crash.
B) it's been corroded by salt / wet weather
C) there is a stress riser in the frame causing a crack to develop.

I'd put steel above titanium CF and lastly Alu for frame durability.

Others might have different views

Cheers James


I see, thanks. I wondered what the phrase "nominal frame life" used by wjhall meant.

alexnharvey
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Re: Pricing a bike for sale

Postby alexnharvey » 31 Dec 2020, 10:56am

Whatever your views on ebay, I find the sold items search very helpful as a guide to pricing,

https://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/i.html?_from ... Complete=1

as well as current asking prices for the same and similar bikes, noting that these may be optimistic.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/2019-Spa-Cyc ... SwGKJfu-hj

It's also worth noting that you can often expect to get the best price on ebay due to the wide 'reach' but there are the fees to take into account (unless you list on a £1 max fee weekend), hassle with buyers and returns, scams etc.

If I were going to put it on ebay I'd probably list it for 600 or 650 and allow buyers to make offers. If you list it here and the other touring bike forums maybe 500 would be a fair asking price?

mikeymo
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Re: Pricing a bike for sale

Postby mikeymo » 31 Dec 2020, 11:10am

alexnharvey wrote:Whatever your views on ebay, I find the sold items search very helpful as a guide to pricing,

https://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/i.html?_from ... Complete=1

as well as current asking prices for the same and similar bikes, noting that these may be optimistic.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/2019-Spa-Cyc ... SwGKJfu-hj

It's also worth noting that you can often expect to get the best price on ebay due to the wide 'reach' but there are the fees to take into account (unless you list on a £1 max fee weekend), hassle with buyers and returns, scams etc.

If I were going to put it on ebay I'd probably list it for 600 or 650 and allow buyers to make offers. If you list it here and the other touring bike forums maybe 500 would be a fair asking price?


Yes, use the "Advanced" option right next to the "Search" button, then specify "Sold", along with your search term (something like "Spa Cycles Tourer"). That will give you a better idea of what people are actually paying for things, rather than price the seller is hoping to get.

To be honest, I've never found any of the "make an offer" type things on ebay very satisfactory, either as a buyer or a seller.

Selling things, sometimes quite expensive things, what has been most satisfactory for me is simply to start off the auction with the bare minimum I'm prepared to accept - "I'd rather have it cluttering up the house than let it go for less than XXX". That sort of thing.

Then just resign yourself that it will probably go for less than you hope, but that that is the nature of markets. But I have sometimes sold things and been pleasantly surprised (non-functioning Apple computers are still worth money, it turns out).

And let the auction run, don't be tempted by the various - "how much will you take to stop the auction now" or "is there a buy it now price, mate?" messages you'll get.

Your biggest issue will be posting it, or not. It will almost certainly depress the price you'll get if you aren't willing to send it. If it were a 54cm I might be interested myself, but not if I have to collect it at the other end of the country.

puffin
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Location: Bicester / Aylesbury

Re: Pricing a bike for sale

Postby puffin » 31 Dec 2020, 12:38pm

Mikeymo and alexnharvey, thanks for your help and advice, its much appreciated. I am a fan of ebay and used the cold and completed searches, that's a good idea. There's a much newer version of my bike on there for I think around £900...mine is not worth that. I'm going to look into the logistics of posting the bike (its how I got this one, Spa couriered it down to me).

I'm goingto wait til lthe weather improves then pull all the excellent advice together and sell the bike then.

puffin
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Joined: 15 Aug 2010, 3:29pm
Location: Bicester / Aylesbury

Re: Pricing a bike for sale

Postby puffin » 31 Dec 2020, 12:40pm

De Sisti wrote:
puffin wrote:A year ago I went on a 2 day cycle maintenance course,

Where did it take place and how much did it cost?


It was in Aylesbury, ATG, and about £270.

Bonefishblues
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Location: Near Bicester Oxon

Re: Pricing a bike for sale

Postby Bonefishblues » 31 Dec 2020, 12:40pm

puffin wrote:Mikeymo and alexnharvey, thanks for your help and advice, its much appreciated. I am a fan of ebay and used the cold and completed searches, that's a good idea. There's a much newer version of my bike on there for I think around £900...mine is not worth that. I'm going to look into the logistics of posting the bike (its how I got this one, Spa couriered it down to me).

I'm goingto wait til lthe weather improves then pull all the excellent advice together and sell the bike then.

For bike courier services, many (most?) people use Paisley Freight, so start there, I suggest. I sold two bikes very quickly when a. I put them on eBay and b. I offered to post.

fenmanctc
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Joined: 15 Dec 2013, 10:10am

Re: Pricing a bike for sale

Postby fenmanctc » 31 Dec 2020, 1:39pm

Relating to counting teeth on sprockets and chainwheels and links on chains, I find tippex on one invaluable ( or blu-tak) I suppose.
Happy New Year to everyone.

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horizon
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Re: Pricing a bike for sale

Postby horizon » 31 Dec 2020, 1:55pm

One thing we might not have mentioned (unless I have missed it) is time of year. Easter is obviously better than January.

Another point is that posting has become a lot easier. You can pick up a bike box from an LBS and then eat into the mountain of bubble wrap and cardboard from all your other deliveries. Parcel Force (and others mentioned) do standard pricing.

Photographing is now a cinch and that means that the buyer can purchase unseen if you have really photographed every blemish. As a buyer I would also appreciate an assurance that the major seize points are free. These could also be photographed: BB, seatpost and stem. It is extra hassle but you end up having sold the bike at a better price and with a satisfied buyer.

I'm not sure that "extras" such as panniers really influence the price and are better sold separately.
When the pestilence strikes from the East, go far and breathe the cold air deeply. Ignore the sage, stay not indoors. Ho Ri Zon 12th Century Chinese philosopher

mikeymo
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Re: Pricing a bike for sale

Postby mikeymo » 31 Dec 2020, 2:58pm

horizon wrote:Photographing is now a cinch and that means that the buyer can purchase unseen if you have really photographed every blemish. As a buyer I would also appreciate an assurance that the major seize points are free. These could also be photographed: BB, seatpost and stem. It is extra hassle but you end up having sold the bike at a better price and with a satisfied buyer.


Indeed. I usually do fairly well with eBay sales, and I'm sure at least some of it is to do with taking as many photographs as possible. I usually wait till I can photograph things outside in the daylight, and I use a very good digital camera, with my best lens. Photos of declared blemishes are very good at establishing your straightforward honesty. Hell, I've even done videos of some things to prove they work to send to people who ask (audio/musical equipment). You could do the same - "here are the cranks going round" type thing. Maybe slightly weird, but you never know who it'll convince.

What puts me off eBay sellers are things which have few photos, or even worse, library photos from the manufacturer's website. Or things which are plainly incorrect. For instance I'm on the look out for a 9 speed triple Ultegra front derailleur. It's astonishing the number being advertised like that on eBay which obviously aren't (even to the extent of displaying a photograph of the back of the cage with the wrong number on it!).

Also honest descriptions - "I've had this for X years, reckon it's done about xx thousand miles, not perfect but well maintained, a few scratches as pictured but nothing major" - is a lot better than - "like new!!!" when it clearly isn't.