assymetry police....

General cycling advice ( NOT technical ! )
neilob
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assymetry police....

Post by neilob »

Some time ago there was a thread about people riding assymetrically with a single pannier and how bad it looks. This has worried me since then......but riding home yesterday I realised that bikes are naturally assymetric with chainsets, chains and changers all hanging off the right hand side. So there I am with a pannier (on the right), a mirror (on the right), and all my transmission bits (on the right). The answer to this challenging problem is surely to task Shimano with moving chainsets et al onto the left side? Otherwise I'd have to buy a new pannier.
james01
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Re: assymetry police....

Post by james01 »

neilob wrote:bikes are naturally assymetric with chainsets, chains and changers all hanging off the right hand side. .


doh !, I'd never thought of this. I always thought I looked well-balanced with either 2 or zero panniers. Now I won't sleep tonight.
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Mick F
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Post by Mick F »

I wonder why it's all on the right? There's no reason that it should be that way, except for convention.

There's a thread on here somewhere in that Thirdcrank told us of a track rider with two chainsets and two rear sprockets and two chains. His bike must be THE most symmetrical!
Mick F. Cornwall
reohn2

Re: assymetry police....

Post by reohn2 »

neilob wrote:Some time ago there was a thread about people riding assymetrically with a single pannier and how bad it looks. This has worried me since then......but riding home yesterday I realised that bikes are naturally assymetric with chainsets, chains and changers all hanging off the right hand side. So there I am with a pannier (on the right), a mirror (on the right), and all my transmission bits (on the right). The answer to this challenging problem is surely to task Shimano with moving chainsets et al onto the left side? Otherwise I'd have to buy a new pannier.


Which side(if this isn't too personal a question)do you dress?(assuming you're male(if not this doesn't apply)if you are male then you could redress(pun intended)the balance so to speak.
neilob
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Post by neilob »

maybe a penny farthing resurgence is what's needed.....
thirdcrank
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Post by thirdcrank »

In the days when the York Rally was for simple folk who enjoyed simple fun (like Thelwell :oops: cartoons) I remember at least once seeing a stand with a competition where you had to count all the faults on a wrongly assembled bike. Somebody must have gone to a lot of trouble because the entire drivetrain was on the LHS.
neilob
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Post by neilob »

Reohn, being a family forum I didn't want to add that specific fact, although there was a tendency to the right. And I always put my wallet in the right hand pocket of my jersey and my phone in the right hand compartment of the bar bag...... It gets worse doesn't it?? Surprised I'm not tacking like a yacht.
pigman
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Post by pigman »

many BMX bikes have transmission on the left. go to any BMX/skate park and you'll see em. The main problem must be needeing a left hand freewheel
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Mick F
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Post by Mick F »

pigman wrote:many BMX bikes have transmission on the left.


Why?
Is there a specific BMX reason?
Mick F. Cornwall
pigman
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Post by pigman »

no, its just posing. A few years ago, it was a unique talking point in the parks, now its still a bit different, but more common. Going to our local park, I'd have said between 10 to 20% of bikes are lefters and its the more specialist equipment, not the kiddies stuff
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360fix
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Post by 360fix »

neilob wrote:maybe a penny farthing resurgence is what's needed.....


Has anyone actually ridden a penny farthing (I mean recently)? It must be almost as hard as riding a unicycle, except its much farther to fall...
pigman
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Post by pigman »

never ridden a penny farthing, but Ive heard that as the wheel is bigger, its actually easier to balance at slow speeds. But, Im no scientist
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Mick F
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Post by Mick F »

Can you get a penny farthing with a smaller front wheel and a hub gear? Sounds a good idea. Absolutely maintenance-free. No chain!

Basically, a front-wheel-drive bike?
Mick F. Cornwall
neilob
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Post by neilob »

Mick, I'm rushing off to the patent office now!! But where do the panniers hang?
Using a car to take an adult on a three mile journey is the same as using an atomic bomb to kill a canary.
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Mick F
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Post by Mick F »

Very small ones, either side of the 'farthing'?

I wouldn't be in a rush to the patent's office, I'm always inventing stuff that's been invented before.

My ideas, that I can recall at the mo, have included:
Roller blades.
A small step-stool with casters so you can move it about easily, then the casters retract when you stand on it. (Seen in every supermarket)
Mick F. Cornwall
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