Where to hire a tricycle?

General cycling advice ( NOT technical ! )
Redbug

Where to hire a tricycle?

Postby Redbug » 13 Sep 2008, 2:51pm

Does anyone know if there is anywhere, not a million miles away from Leeds, where I can hire a small wheeled adult tricycle?

I'm trying to get my elderly mum back into cycling for basic transportation and, as she has balance issues, I think a trike would be worth a try. We are off to Centrparcs at the end of October and that would be a really good place for her to try one out, so I'm after hiring / borrowing one for a week or so then. I've got a trailer to pick it up, I just don't know where to try. Any ideas?

Karen Sutton
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Location: Greater Manchester

Postby Karen Sutton » 13 Sep 2008, 5:08pm

Redbug,

Trikes are not as easy to ride as they look. I bought our tandem trike from an elderly couple who thought it would be easier to balance than an ordinary tandem. They sold it to us after they had turned it on its side several times when falling foul of adverse camber on the lanes. This couple were experienced cyclists (ex racing), but they hadn't ridden a trike before.

Falling off is far worse the older you get as bones don't mend as easily. Riding a trike is completely different from a bike. It's very hard work on the shoulders due to the correcting that must be done to keep it upright on corners and on the afore mentioned adverse camber.

If you can borrow one to try then that would be the best bet. But try before you take it away on holiday if you can.

vernon
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Location: Meanwood, Leeds

Postby vernon » 13 Sep 2008, 7:11pm

Karen Sutton wrote:Redbug,

Trikes are not as easy to ride as they look. I bought our tandem trike from an elderly couple who thought it would be easier to balance than an ordinary tandem. They sold it to us after they had turned it on its side several times when falling foul of adverse camber on the lanes. This couple were experienced cyclists (ex racing), but they hadn't ridden a trike before.

Falling off is far worse the older you get as bones don't mend as easily. Riding a trike is completely different from a bike. It's very hard work on the shoulders due to the correcting that must be done to keep it upright on corners and on the afore mentioned adverse camber.

If you can borrow one to try then that would be the best bet. But try before you take it away on holiday if you can.


For many years I'd nurtured the desire to own a tricycle and last year a pal of mine had to tear me away from the tricycle display area at the York Rally telling me that ownership would end in tears. I desprately wanted to have a go on one of the demonstration trike but left the Rally before there was an available slot.

As we cycled along the York to Selby cycle path we met a couple of tricyclists coming in the opposite direction and one of them noticed me drooling and kindly offered me a go. I got off to a very wobbly start but managed to pedal 100m away from the group. Turning round and pedalling back provided several minutes of mirth as the almost imperceptible camber introduced a bias to the steering which led to me being deposited heading into a hedgerow.

It was an instant cure for my protracted desire for three whelled exotica.

thirdcrank
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Postby thirdcrank » 13 Sep 2008, 8:52pm

I'd endorse what others say about trikes. If anybody was going to be able to help in Leeds, I should have thought The William Merit Centrewould be the best place to start.

Anura
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Location: Near Risley Moss Warrington

Tricycle for your Mum

Postby Anura » 13 Sep 2008, 9:02pm

How about Wheels for all? I do have details somewhere, in fact was looking at the addresses today but will have to get back to you if I find them.

People can try things out in order to get them back into cycling or even just to start to cycle.

I will try to find my pieces of paper (not easy) but meantime you might just have a look.

Regards

Anura

Redbug

Postby Redbug » 14 Sep 2008, 1:02pm

Thanks for your help, especially for the leads 'Wheels for all' and the 'William Merit Centre'.

I do realise riding a trike is very different to a bike and I really don't know how my mum would get on. (so that's why we want to try one out)

I use a load-trike most days for shopping and kid transport. It has centre-point steering and riding it has been likened to riding a unicycle whilst pushing a shopping trolley. It is hilarious watching other people try the thing out. I use it daily though, for all our shopping and taking the kids to school, it's amazing what you can get used to. I've never crashed it, though I've come close a couple of times.

Anura
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Location: Near Risley Moss Warrington

How to hire a tricycle

Postby Anura » 15 Sep 2008, 12:09pm

Redbug

As promised I give below the address for Wheels for All Centre in Leeds.

South Leeds Stadium
Middleton Grove
Leeds
Yorks
LS11 5DJ
0113 3950159

I went to a local one once to try out a trike recumbent. You have to pay about £15 I think (maybe more now).
They cater for people new/returning to cycling & those cycling for health.

Am not quite sure what goes on nowadays but give them a ring and they may be able to help you.

I hope you manage to get some transport for your Mum but I agree with the others - upright trikes are not easy to ride, there is a definite knack.

Let us know how you go on with it.

Regards Anura

Redbug

Re: How to hire a tricycle

Postby Redbug » 15 Sep 2008, 1:25pm

Thank you. :)

Anura wrote:Redbug

As promised I give below the address for Wheels for All Centre in Leeds.

South Leeds Stadium
Middleton Grove
Leeds
Yorks
LS11 5DJ
0113 3950159

I went to a local one once to try out a trike recumbent. You have to pay about £15 I think (maybe more now).
They cater for people new/returning to cycling & those cycling for health.

Am not quite sure what goes on nowadays but give them a ring and they may be able to help you.

I hope you manage to get some transport for your Mum but I agree with the others - upright trikes are not easy to ride, there is a definite knack.

Let us know how you go on with it.

Regards Anura

thirdcrank
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Joined: 9 Jan 2007, 2:44pm

Postby thirdcrank » 15 Sep 2008, 4:02pm

Redbug

Having been to an event years ago at what I think is now the John Charles Stadium, I had forgotten about it. I thought it was a one-off by a visiting organisation, just using the stadium as a venue.

If you do get any joy there, can you post some feedback for the next time somebody asks?

Redbug

Follow up

Postby Redbug » 2 Nov 2008, 10:03pm

Interestingly, and impressively, Centerparcs, it turns out, do hire trikes suitable for adults. However due to the hills, slippy leaves etc. i couldn't persuade my elderly mum to try one for the week. She did borrow one from a bike shop in Cambridge and tried it out in a dead flat school playground: she couldn't ever steer it in those perfect conditions. :roll: So she'll persevere with her bike, 'till she falls off it again, and then that'll be it, i don't know what she'll do. Ho - hum.

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squeaker
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Location: Sussex

Try a recumbent trike?

Postby squeaker » 3 Nov 2008, 10:04am

With their much lower Cof G they don't seem have the same steering / falling over issues that DF based trikes have.
Hase do several wth relatively high seats but a reasonable turn of speed. IME 'Deltas' are easier to get on /off than 'tadpoles', but a Trice T might be worth a try. Give Kevin at D-Tek (in Ely) a call to see what's in his emporium: 01353648177 or dtekhpvs@btconnect.com
"42"

Redbug

Re: Try a recumbent trike?

Postby Redbug » 3 Nov 2008, 2:22pm

squeaker wrote:With their much lower Cof G they don't seem have the same steering / falling over issues that DF based trikes have.
Hase do several wth relatively high seats but a reasonable turn of speed. IME 'Deltas' are easier to get on /off than 'tadpoles', but a Trice T might be worth a try. Give Kevin at D-Tek (in Ely) a call to see what's in his emporium: 01353648177 or dtekhpvs@btconnect.com


Thanks for the sugestion, in her place it'd be right up my street. However the weird factor will prove overwhelming and i'm afraid this is a non-starter for her. :(

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paulah
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Postby paulah » 3 Nov 2008, 4:48pm

Image
how about this trilux trike? easy to get on / off, low centre of gravity and it folds

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squeaker
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Re: Try a recumbent trike?

Postby squeaker » 3 Nov 2008, 5:13pm

Redbug wrote:Thanks for the sugestion, in her place it'd be right up my street. However the weird factor will prove overwhelming and i'm afraid this is a non-starter for her. :(
Have you actually asked her? IMHO one of these, is far more 'weird' than one of these! But there again, I can't get my 94yr old father-in-law to sit on one of my 'bents either - 'they don't know what they are missing' etc., etc..
"42"

steve_m
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Re: Follow up

Postby steve_m » 3 Nov 2008, 10:24pm

Redbug wrote:Interestingly, and impressively, Centerparcs, it turns out, do hire trikes suitable for adults.


My wife hired one from Centreparcs this summer as she was 38 weeks pregnant at the time. She got on very well with it, although to be fair she was only using it to keep up with us when we were walking, not cycling. I had a go and I found it fine, no problems steering at all, just think of it as a different vehicle to a bicycle. Then again not everyone gets on with them, a friend borrowed it and whilst trying to set off the speed warning sign crashed it into a rock and bent one of the cranks! :-)