CYCLE TRAILERS

General cycling advice ( NOT technical ! )
jrg
Posts: 3
Joined: 14 Aug 2009, 1:48am
Location: London

Re: CYCLE TRAILERS

Postby jrg » 21 Aug 2009, 9:06am

climo wrote:However since I'm starting to cycle on rougher roads more and more I'm bought a Y frame which is more robust and higher so will not catch on central grass ridges on paths so much.

With your experience with the City, which size of Y-Frame did you go for?

jrg
Posts: 3
Joined: 14 Aug 2009, 1:48am
Location: London

Re: CYCLE TRAILERS

Postby jrg » 21 Aug 2009, 9:15am

niggle wrote:Just a word of warning, I bought one of these from Argos and had to take it back, the general quality was very poor and it had an inherent fault, [[...]] I turned a corner and the load slid against the fabric side causing it to rub on the tyre and this instantly rubbed a hole in the material. The bendy spring type hitch was not very impressive either. I would avoid anything with fabric sides and no protection between the sides and wheels: such as that German one appears to be.

That seems useful information. Of course, with the Y-Frame, flat-bed approach, the user has to provide the box or other side protection themselves. But I can see that it gives flexibility, to either put things in a box, or strap-on things already in a box.

niggle wrote:If you are an average handyman and can get hold of a couple of wheels from a dead BMX then building a trailer of your own is perfectly feasible, there are loads of different designs out there on the net, including the Carry Freedom bamboo design for instance and it appeals to me to use recycled materials.

and there's the rub - I'm already looking for something that'll fold down to take up less space, as "modern city living" doesn't come with much in the way of storage cupboards, and certainly not garden sheds or workshops for construction projects.

climo
Posts: 525
Joined: 29 Apr 2009, 8:08am
Location: Warminster

Re: CYCLE TRAILERS

Postby climo » 21 Aug 2009, 7:20pm

jrg wrote:
climo wrote:However since I'm starting to cycle on rougher roads more and more I'm bought a Y frame which is more robust and higher so will not catch on central grass ridges on paths so much.

With your experience with the City, which size of Y-Frame did you go for?

Small, as I want to go through doors. Overall it's roughly the same size as the city but probably not quite as flexible in usage. Not used it yet as I'm busy with other things not least our new puppy :D

climo
Posts: 525
Joined: 29 Apr 2009, 8:08am
Location: Warminster

Re: CYCLE TRAILERS

Postby climo » 21 Aug 2009, 7:23pm

MikeL wrote:
climo wrote:. Hence I may reluctantly sell the city. :(


Shall we haggle? :D

Dunno. I may keep it. However if someone offered me a sensible price I'll probably sell it. PM if you want details

Daniel B
Posts: 96
Joined: 16 Jul 2007, 10:13pm

Re: CYCLE TRAILERS

Postby Daniel B » 1 Dec 2016, 5:48pm

It's thread resurrection time :-)

Seemed silly to create a new one, and I feel a lot of details on this thread are still relevant, but prices have gone up, and maybe some new ideas have cropped up in the meantime.

My situation, is I am thinking about a trailer of sorts for the weekly shop - only about 2 miles away.
We already have a Kona Minute (Not the huge Ute) which has a childseat and panniers, but that clearly is not enough on it's own.

Hopefully not looking at spending many hundreds; the Burley Travoy caught my eye, but that is £200 without any bags or storage options.
For what I am after, I suspect a flat base would be most flexible, with a whopping great box on top.

I also have one of these, which I bought second hand, but was barely used, and we have not used it much, and soon my little girl will be too big, so perhaps I could cannibalise it:
Image

I have seen this box that looks to have pretty good dimensions of 960mm (L) x 560mm (W) x 460mm (H):
https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00UPEHMXY/ref=ask_ql_qh_dp_hza
Image

Alternative bases would seem to be the Carry freedom Y Frame trailer, but those are around £200, although I have put a watch alert on ebay in the hope of one localish turning up - you never know.

I have also seen items such as these:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Bike-Trailer-Cover-140-litres/dp/B00AQ1SXFM/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_product_top?ie=UTF8
Image

http://www.tredz.co.uk/.Avenir-Mule-Utility-Trailer_44913.htm
Image

Which I could potentially use, or cannibalise to fit a box onto.

Has anyone carried out anything like this recently, or have ongoing feedback\advice obtained from peoples past or current setups.

Additionally, I am not sure whether to go wheel attachment, or seatpost.
Planning to fit this to a single speed langster which is not QR, but old fashioned bolts, would that prove an issue does anyone know?

Thanks

Dan

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meic
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Location: Caerfyrddin (Carmarthen)

Re: CYCLE TRAILERS

Postby meic » 1 Dec 2016, 6:06pm

My trailer was fitted to a nutted rear axle without any problems.

I dont see why you cant just drop the shopping bags in the child trailer, it worked for me.
I could disconnect the fabric seat and lay it flat very easily when needed.
Yma o Hyd

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gaz
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Joined: 9 Mar 2007, 12:09pm
Location: Kent, car park of England

Re: CYCLE TRAILERS

Postby gaz » 1 Dec 2016, 6:19pm

+1 to meic's advice. At the very least it's a starting point.

If dropping your shopping bags into the child trailer works well then you've no need to make any additional investment.

Last year I picked up a second hand Avenir Mule and kitted it out with a Burley Hitch some hooking points, luggage straps and cargo net. Sub £40 for the lot. I really ought to use it more than I do.
2020 : To redundancy ... and beyond!

Daniel B
Posts: 96
Joined: 16 Jul 2007, 10:13pm

Re: CYCLE TRAILERS

Postby Daniel B » 2 Dec 2016, 12:20am

Thanks for the suggestions chaps, I will give the trailer as it is a go for sure, not sure why that had not occurred to me.

It is only a single child one, so I guess is a bit narrower than some, and hence not as much room as there might be.

Out of interest, the trailer you bought, what was the need for putting the different bits on, I know Burley are top drawer for bike related gear, so assume it is betetr quality tthan what was on the stock one you picked up second hand?

Thanks

Dan

Tangled Metal
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Joined: 13 Feb 2015, 8:32pm

Re: CYCLE TRAILERS

Postby Tangled Metal » 2 Dec 2016, 8:28am

I've seen some cheaper brands hitches and I reckon Burly hitches are better. I got a good deal for our burly trailer new so was happy. IMHO if you're towing your child/children then a good hitch and security strap is a given requirement.

Burly hitches aren't the only ones. There's a German brand I think that's better for hitches but not by much. Is it Witter like the towbars?

One point to note. With burly hitch bracket, make sure you're rear wheel QR is safe and secure using it. Same with other hitches from the QR.

rjb
Posts: 3837
Joined: 11 Jan 2007, 10:25am
Location: Somerset (originally 60/70's Plymouth)

Re: CYCLE TRAILERS

Postby rjb » 2 Dec 2016, 8:45am

Plenty of info in the too good to lose archive. This is one thread of several. viewtopic.php?f=5&t=14609

:wink:
At the last count:- Peugeot 531 pro, Dawes Discovery Tandem, Dawes Kingpin, Raleigh 20, Falcon K2 MTB dropped bar tourer, Longstaff trike conversion on a Falcon corsa. :D

ambodach
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Joined: 15 Mar 2011, 6:45pm

Re: CYCLE TRAILERS

Postby ambodach » 2 Dec 2016, 9:01am

I have a BoB trailer which I used for several tours. It was ok on a mountain bike but did not feel very good on a lighter road bike. Can be a bit of a handful in confined spaces and the load capacity is not really as good as advertised. About 12 kg was ok but more felt a bit more unstable. The single wheel is better on narrow roads but on balance I would not really recommend it unless for mountain biking or light loads. I now have a CF but not yet used it in anger. It is destined for behind my Brompton or Bike Friday once I get the hitch for the latter sorted out.

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gaz
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Location: Kent, car park of England

Re: CYCLE TRAILERS

Postby gaz » 2 Dec 2016, 9:24am

Daniel B wrote:Out of interest, the trailer you bought, what was the need for putting the different bits on, I know Burley are top drawer for bike related gear, so assume it is betetr quality tthan what was on the stock one you picked up second hand?

I'd been doing some research before hand and came across this review and this thread.

My Avenir Mule came with a chainstay clamp hitch. Based on my research I decided a Burley Hitch would be better. I was extremely luck to find one at a very good price.

I have managed to overturn it once. I had not distributed the load evenly (various tools and a heavy wooden post) and it went over as I moved from the road to the adjacent contra-flow cycle track in an overenthusiastic manner. A little unsettling but no harm done.

AIUI the Avenir Mule now has a hitch similar to that pictured on your child trailer, I expect I would have stuck with one like that.
2020 : To redundancy ... and beyond!

niggle
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Location: Cornwall, near England

Re: CYCLE TRAILERS

Postby niggle » 2 Dec 2016, 1:08pm

Daniel B wrote:Additionally, I am not sure whether to go wheel attachment, or seatpost.

Seems to me rear axle attachment is the way to go, bikes pretty much turn, left/right, around the rear axle and leaning causes more movement the higher up the attachment point. This should mean IMO that forces exerted on the rear axle by the trailer should be minimised and vice versa. Looks like you are going that way anyway :)

nigelnightmare
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Joined: 19 Sep 2016, 10:33pm

Re: CYCLE TRAILERS

Postby nigelnightmare » 2 Dec 2016, 1:19pm

niggle wrote:
Daniel B wrote:Additionally, I am not sure whether to go wheel attachment, or seatpost.

Seems to me rear axle attachment is the way to go, bikes pretty much turn, left/right, around the rear axle and leaning causes more movement the higher up the attachment point. This should mean IMO that forces exerted on the rear axle by the trailer should be minimised and vice versa. Looks like you are going that way anyway :)


Also axle mount effects handling LESS than seatpost mount with heavier loads.