Touring Tripod

General cycling advice ( NOT technical ! )
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zenzinnia
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Touring Tripod

Postby zenzinnia » 14 Aug 2009, 12:10am

I gotouring around onmy bike an take my DSLR along with me. Recently I've been getting more and more into taking photos that require a tripod - macros, low light, long lenses etc and I have a lovely manfroto tripod but it's a bit to long and hefty to be taking on tour. Has anyone got any suggestions for a reasonablt priced tripod suitable for touring?

PS I don't ant to use the bike as a steady objectto put a gorilla grip on or anything 'cos I often leave the bike at the bottom of a walk up a mountain or lockedup as I go elsewhere.

random37
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Re: Touring Tripod

Postby random37 » 14 Aug 2009, 12:41am

How about a beanbag? Even little tripods are a pain in the bum to carry.

stewartpratt
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Re: Touring Tripod

Postby stewartpratt » 14 Aug 2009, 8:59am

The Gorillapod and Ultrapod are the obvious choices. Both small (though available in more than one size) and capable of either free-standing or being attached to other objects.

(Edit: sorry, missed your PS)

Suggest not carrying them up your bum :)

byegad
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Re: Touring Tripod

Postby byegad » 14 Aug 2009, 9:06am

I bought a motorcycle mount for a camcorder from BuyBIts, usual disclaimer no connection other than as a customer. It was a RAM CAMERA & VIDEO HANDLEBAR MOUNT RAM-B-149Z-C1U (SKU 3622). No need for a tripod just a kick stand and use the bike as the tripod.
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Flinders
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Re: Touring Tripod

Postby Flinders » 14 Aug 2009, 9:21am

Have you tried a monopod? They're far less bulky, and I find they work well. I have a manfrotto tripod, it's great, but as you say, weighs a ton and is very bulky, but for steadying a heavy long lens I find a monopod is fine. I have a very heavy camera (Minolta D9 film body + grip) and surprisingly even with a 200/2.8 lens and 2xTC a cheap, light monopod can do the job. Of course, it wouldn't do for very long exposures, but to steady the lens to prevent hunting in low light it is fine. So long as I carry it carefully, holding the camera so as not to put too much strain on the quick-release, I can sprint across racecourses with it, which would be impossible for me with a big tripod, and you can follow action better with a monopod.

The one I got (a hama) has a quick-release thing you attach to the camera, which is handy. It's long enough to be used standing, and will go short enough to be used kneeling down. A mate of mine uses his set short and rests the foot in his belt, which he says makes it very steady, and still very mobile.

gilesjuk
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Re: Touring Tripod

Postby gilesjuk » 14 Aug 2009, 1:38pm

I bought a Gorillapod SLR from Jessops for about £30-40. Saw same tripod in ASDA for £18!!!!! GRRRR.

reohn2
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Re: Touring Tripod

Postby reohn2 » 14 Aug 2009, 7:41pm

As Flinders says a Monopod is good,I have one but tend not to use it nowadays prefering a telescopic walkingstick like this one:-http://www.amazon.co.uk/Camlink-CMP1-Walking-Stick-Monopod/dp/B001GCVF78
Or this one:-http://www.headtothehills.co.uk/outdoor-clothing-specialist/product.php/700/leki-sierra-fotosystem--fs-pole-
Or just rest the camera on the top of an ordinary tele w/stick
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Flinders
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Re: Touring Tripod

Postby Flinders » 15 Aug 2009, 3:17pm

I didn't think of that-Tele walking sticks with the camera thread are great- I've had one of the Leki ones for donkey's years- it's been great, never any problems with it. Great for sunsets or dramatic bad-weather-low-light shots, and in high winds on ridges! Packing-wise fine on the rucksack but mine would be a bit clumpy on the bike (Mine has the old cross-handles).
It is useful to have the quick-release plate they you get on a monopod sometimes, though.

climo
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Re: Touring Tripod

Postby climo » 15 Aug 2009, 6:00pm

gitzo carbon fibre range

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Phil_Lee
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Re: Touring Tripod

Postby Phil_Lee » 15 Aug 2009, 10:15pm

Even an extremely lightweight tripod can be made very rigid by carrying a string bag to hang underneath and fill with locally sourced rocks (or anything else heavy that's available). :D

Flinders
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Re: Touring Tripod

Postby Flinders » 16 Aug 2009, 11:25pm

Painters do that with easels, and it really does work! :wink:

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andrew_s
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Re: Touring Tripod

Postby andrew_s » 17 Aug 2009, 2:03pm

Phil_Lee wrote:Even an extremely lightweight tripod can be made very rigid by carrying a string bag to hang underneath and fill with locally sourced rocks (or anything else heavy that's available). :D
Note that the length of the sting you hang the bag from needs to be easily adjustable. The bag needs to be partly resting on the ground, otherwise is could swing and make matters worse.

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Phil_Lee
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Re: Touring Tripod

Postby Phil_Lee » 19 Aug 2009, 5:03am

andrew_s wrote:
Phil_Lee wrote:Even an extremely lightweight tripod can be made very rigid by carrying a string bag to hang underneath and fill with locally sourced rocks (or anything else heavy that's available). :D
Note that the length of the sting you hang the bag from needs to be easily adjustable. The bag needs to be partly resting on the ground, otherwise is could swing and make matters worse.


I never had that problem - it's not like you're not going to be able to see any swinging and stop it.
It was a common trick for pro photographers, but they tend to use the camera bag with at least half a dozen lenses and a couple of spare bodies & backs in, along with extra film, filters, a flashgun or two, batteries. . .
Can add up to 25Kg or so quite easily.
It was even heavier in the days I did it with medium format. :shock:
I think anything that moves that lot will probably move the scenery as well :D

Flinders
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Re: Touring Tripod

Postby Flinders » 22 Aug 2009, 10:46pm

I'm surprised you could still walk carrying that lot!

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Cunobelin
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Re: Touring Tripod

Postby Cunobelin » 23 Aug 2009, 9:30am

Slightly OT, but the Abus UGH bracket lets you cary a monopod / walking stick inside the carrier frame.