Puncture repairs with Evo-Stik?

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squeaker
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Re: Puncture repairs with Evo-Stik?

Postby squeaker » 12 Jan 2010, 9:33am

bovlomov wrote:p.s... Superglue's only good for eyelids and fingers.
And split lips, according to my mate Tony. Mind you, the way he waffles on, it surprised me that Casualty didn't Superglue both lips together for a bit of peace and quiet :lol:
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MarySkater
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Re: Puncture repairs with Evo-Stik?

Postby MarySkater » 12 Jan 2010, 11:27am

I remember once walking my bike home with a puncture, and digging out the puncture repair kit to find that the glue had completely dried up (not sure if it had ever been used, but it would have been a few years old). I put a patch on with Evostick because I had it available, and it worked okay.

Since then, I try to remember to buy a new tube of glue every year or so. I don't cycle much, and seldom more than a couple of miles from home, so punctures are a rare event. I've never yet had to fix one at the roadside, although I do carry a kit if I go further afield.

I doubt if Evostick would be cheaper, but I found it okay as a backup. I agree about Araldite drying rigid. If you ever want to, say, turn up a hem on a pair of overtrousers, use Evostick.

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mark a.
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Re: Puncture repairs with Evo-Stik?

Postby mark a. » 12 Jan 2010, 11:54am

How are the Park Tools glue-less patch kits like? After failing to use a normal puncture repair kit (it was really old so I don't hold it against it) I bought a few Park Tools patches, but have yet to use them. I'm hoping that (a) I won't need them ever but that (b) if I do need them they'll actually work.

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7_lives_left
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Re: Puncture repairs with Evo-Stik?

Postby 7_lives_left » 12 Jan 2010, 1:38pm

mark a. wrote:How are the Park Tools glue-less patch kits like?

I tried then many years ago with high pressure narrow tires. They worked and were
easy to use, but sometimes failed at a later date. When you removed the patch to
try to fit a replacement, it was difficult to clean up the inner tube. That usually meant
throwing away the inner tube.

bovlomov wrote:And split lips, according to my mate Tony. Mind you, the way he waffles on, it surprised me that Casualty didn't Superglue both lips together for a bit of peace and quiet

My brother told me that super glue was originally developed for battle field surgeons to glue together blood vessels to stop them bleeding.

I have some evostick at home that I used to stick the soles of my cycling shoes back on (it worked well so far). I might have a little experiment with an inner tube.

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Re: Puncture repairs with Evo-Stik?

Postby goatwarden » 12 Jan 2010, 2:23pm

7_lives_left wrote:bovlomov wrote:
And split lips, according to my mate Tony. Mind you, the way he waffles on, it surprised me that Casualty didn't Superglue both lips together for a bit of peace and quiet


I once put a large gash in my scalp by getting too iintimate with a steel joist at work. I assumed I would be unable to complete the task I had begun as I would be spending the afternoon in Casualty getting darned. I was pleasantly surprised when our works nurse just glued it shut with super glue and I was back at work ten minutes later.

Evo Stick is about the most rigid adhesive commonly available. As such it used to be used (probably still is?) to attach strain gauges to substrates sothat any movement of the substrate surface was entirely transferred to the gauge. It probably has thousands of other, equally dull and obscure, uses.

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Mick F
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Re: Puncture repairs with Evo-Stik?

Postby Mick F » 12 Jan 2010, 2:27pm

I just looked up Evo Stick on Wiki, do you know, there isn't a page!
I checked as all one word, hyphenated, and two words.

I wondered where the "Evo" came from.
I sort of understand the "stick" bit!
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pete75
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Re: Puncture repairs with Evo-Stik?

Postby pete75 » 12 Jan 2010, 3:22pm

Mick F wrote:I just looked up Evo Stick on Wiki, do you know, there isn't a page!
I checked as all one word, hyphenated, and two words.

I wondered where the "Evo" came from.
I sort of understand the "stick" bit!

I put evostik & wikipedia into google and it returned the Bostik page. Apparently evostik is just a brand name of bostik.

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Re: Puncture repairs with Evo-Stik?

Postby mark a. » 12 Jan 2010, 3:23pm

7_lives_left wrote:
mark a. wrote:How are the Park Tools glue-less patch kits like?

I tried then many years ago with high pressure narrow tires. They worked and were
easy to use, but sometimes failed at a later date. When you removed the patch to
try to fit a replacement, it was difficult to clean up the inner tube. That usually meant
throwing away the inner tube.


Thanks very much.

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Re: Puncture repairs with Evo-Stik?

Postby reohn2 » 12 Jan 2010, 3:29pm

Mick F wrote:I just looked up Evo Stick on Wiki, do you know, there isn't a page!
I checked as all one word, hyphenated, and two words.

I wondered where the "Evo" came from.
I sort of understand the "stick" bit!


Try "contact adhesive" you apply to bother surfaces wait to dry 10/15 minutes then carefully put the two surfaces together and thats it,its a one way trip.
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Mick F
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Re: Puncture repairs with Evo-Stik?

Postby Mick F » 12 Jan 2010, 3:36pm

Yes, but where does "Evo" come from?

We know what a "marmite" is and what WD stands for in WD40.
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Re: Puncture repairs with Evo-Stik?

Postby stevew » 12 Jan 2010, 3:47pm

squeaker wrote:
bovlomov wrote:p.s... Superglue's only good for eyelids and fingers.
And split lips, according to my mate Tony. Mind you, the way he waffles on, it surprised me that Casualty didn't Superglue both lips together for a bit of peace and quiet :lol:


I think you will find that cyno was originally developed for use in military hospitals on the front line. It's ability to stick flesh together quickly and effectively was far better than using stitches etc.
I often use it on cuts in the workshop, messy but it stops the blood straight away and allows one to get on with the job without spilling blood everywhere.
IMO one of the modern world's wonder products. There is always a bottle in the fridge, keeps for years there. Best place to buy it is in a Model (aircraft) Shop and get the thicker type as it sets slower and is easier to control. Also worth remembering is that it needs moisture to set, just what's in the air, but sometimes a bit of spit will help it go off.
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MikewsMITH2
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Re: Puncture repairs with Evo-Stik?

Postby MikewsMITH2 » 12 Jan 2010, 6:36pm

it needs moisture to set, just what's in the air, but sometimes a bit of spit will help it go off.

Top tip from modellers (my son got it from Games Workshop) is PVA on one surface and superglue on the other
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Re: Puncture repairs with Evo-Stik?

Postby drossall » 12 Jan 2010, 7:07pm

reohn2 wrote:...the best patches are the type with a feathered edge like these...

Curiously I can't get on with those at all. The only stuff I will buy is the sheets of solid strip that you cut into patches of whatever size (and shape) you want. With some good hard sanding, that sticks well.

I fix tubes if there's a pin-hole, but not cuts - they tend to elongate under the patch, and fail. Some of my tubes probably have six or ten patches before I get a puncture too near a previous patch to be readily mendable. I wouldn't want to waste a tube by just throwing it out though if it could be mended.

I haven't bought a full kit in 30 years. I just buy rubber solution and patches, and cut up sheets of sandpaper as well. If you get a lot of punctures, keep a large tube of solution in your toolbox and a small one in your on-bike kit, but with normal use I find that large tubes may dry out.

I, like others, carry several spare tubes and a puncture kit. On my last Audax, I got six punctures, so I used my spare tubes, plus everyone else's, and still had to mend some by the road...

I'd agree that there wouldn't be much saving in Evo-Stik.

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Re: Puncture repairs with Evo-Stik?

Postby reohn2 » 12 Jan 2010, 7:46pm

Mick F wrote:Yes, but where does "Evo" come from?

We know what a "marmite" is and what WD stands for in WD40.


EvoStik is a trade name part of Bostik :- http://www.bostik.co.uk/diy/brand/EVO-STIK
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Re: Puncture repairs with Evo-Stik?

Postby Gearoidmuar » 13 Jan 2010, 7:20am

Mick F wrote:My best puncture tip.
in my experience, tubes are never very good after they have punctured, so often I just chuck 'em out. It's not worth the effort to repair.
.


Can't agree. I've tubes with 6 patches on them. I never repair them at the time, unless absolutely necessary but carry spares. But when I'm really bored I sit down with a pile of them and will fix a load of them.

3 things you need to know.

1. You have to get ALL the shiny stuff off with sandpaper or similar. Otherwise the patch won't stick properly
2. A quarter of an inch of patch surrourding the puncture is what's necessary for a decent-sized puncture.
3. NEVER inflate a freshly fixed tube until it's fully in the tyre. Ideally leave them 24 hours.

It is fussier to do with narrow tubes, but mostly worth a go.