How much do you eat - on a LONG ride

General cycling advice ( NOT technical ! )
mattsccm
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Re: How much do you eat - on a LONG ride

Postby mattsccm » 5 Mar 2012, 7:26pm

Porridge for breaky and maybe some dried fruit in it. Several chewy cereal abrs as well and once the 50 odd miles is passed any shop selling cakes gets hit for something like bread pudding or jam doughnuts. Chocolate is just nice as well but I also like savouries. A bag of chips at lunch time goes down well although I always crave meat especially a kebab.
Actually I crave meat, especialy a kebab 24/7

Manx Cat
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Re: How much do you eat - on a LONG ride

Postby Manx Cat » 5 Mar 2012, 9:48pm

Many thanks again all.

Ayesha thankyou for the VO2 etc explanation.

Rode another 100km on Sunday. Dumped the bagels. Got the porridge on the stove (sorry homemade strawberry jam - just had to). 2 x eggs. Had this with the big intention of eating sandwiches in St Johns (sadly on Sunday the shop was shut ). So got away with it this time, and avoided any hint of a body let down, I felt a bit tired in Foxdale and ate 6 biccies (custard creams) but I had my saviour with me.

MRS R's recipe worked a bloomin treat with polenta instead of oats. (needed to try a gluten free version for daughter) Came out more cakie than chewy, but fabulous stuff. Not called rocket fuel for nothing. Def getting done again is this. Ill take some with me on my UK rides too. Came home from work today to treat myself to a slice and daughter No 2 and hubby had scoffed the lot! Thank your Mrs for me Reohn 2 :)

Getting the metabolism to fit in with food intake isnt easy is it? Its complicated further with Graves, as that swings about too, and I had a nasty flare up of this at Christmas. Plus I am terrified of weight gain. Which doesn't help matters. Its a case of eat or drop and Im going to have to make sure I eat (boy if you had told me of this a few years ago, I'd have laughed my socks off!)

Also roadvader, I found this:

http://www.nomeatathlete.com/vegetarian-diet-athletes/

I expect you know of this site already, it has some very interesting articles. Certainly thinking of a change, even if its not full time.

westofsouth
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Location: Bristol

Re: How much do you eat - on a LONG ride

Postby westofsouth » 6 Mar 2012, 3:44pm

As I know very little about nutrition, there's not much I can add to this... bananas - good, cake - good, bacon butty - good.

As we know, electrolyte balance is important (if you're the type that perspires that is). I find that a sachet of (Boots?) rehydration remedy added to my water at lunch time boosts sodium etc levels, and helps to avoid cramp in the the afternoon - particularly on 100k + rides.

Not strictly nutrition, but we should'nt forget that adequate blood oxygen level is important to maintain muscle performance. When you're tired, breathing tends to become shallower which hastens the onset of 'bonk'. I find that deliberate deep 'diaphragm' breathing can often get you up the hill you may have thought was beyond your capability.

snibgo
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Re: How much do you eat - on a LONG ride

Postby snibgo » 6 Mar 2012, 5:23pm

snibgo wrote:Hmm... I have an opened tin of condensed milk in the fridge and loads of muesli. I feel an experiment coming up.

I filled a shallow Pyrex bowl with muesli and a little condensed milk, and zapped it in the microwave until it was hot (about 3 mins on half power). I mixed it throroughly. After it had cooled for about an hour, I cut it into squares.

A day later, it was fairly well set but quite soft. Most enjoyable -- exceedingly good, we might say.

My muesli is home-made but doubtless it would work with shop-bought.

Gearoidmuar
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Location: Cork, Ireland. Corcaigh, Éire má tá Gaeilge agat.

Re: How much do you eat - on a LONG ride

Postby Gearoidmuar » 6 Mar 2012, 7:45pm

Ayesha wrote:
nez dans le guidon wrote:
Ayesha wrote:Remember,, Muscle, blood capillaries and lung alveoli can deteriorate at three times the rate you can build them.
:D


Hi Ayesha,
Do you have a source for this?


That is the general 'rule of thumb' rule that is mooted.

A more scientific version is "the half life of fitness" which says 12 - 14 days of inactivity will halve your fitness.
The problem with this is you don't know how fit you would be if you had never done ANY exercise. :)
After 12 days of sloth, fitness is halved. After another 12 days, that fitness is halved again.

Following this rule, after four weeks off with a damaged shoulder, I should have lost 3/4 of my fitness.
Using the 'old wives tale' 3x rule, it should have taken me three months to get back, which it did.

Some good reading on nutrition and activity is Kleiber's Law. That will explain all.


I absolutely do not believe that. Not only do I not believe it but I'll quote you just one case I know.
Larry Tomkins was a Cork Gaelic footballer who was a legend for fitness and incessant training.
He tweaked a knee ligament and was told that he might be able to play if he desisted totally from all training for 12 days. Which he did.
He passed a fitness test on the morning of the Munster FInal and gave the display of his life.

There is also the case of the Zatopek effect. Look that up

reohn2
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Joined: 26 Jun 2009, 8:21pm

Re: How much do you eat - on a LONG ride

Postby reohn2 » 6 Mar 2012, 9:35pm

Gearoidmuar wrote:
Ayesha wrote:
nez dans le guidon wrote:Hi Ayesha,
Do you have a source for this?


That is the general 'rule of thumb' rule that is mooted.

A more scientific version is "the half life of fitness" which says 12 - 14 days of inactivity will halve your fitness.
The problem with this is you don't know how fit you would be if you had never done ANY exercise. :)
After 12 days of sloth, fitness is halved. After another 12 days, that fitness is halved again.

Following this rule, after four weeks off with a damaged shoulder, I should have lost 3/4 of my fitness.
Using the 'old wives tale' 3x rule, it should have taken me three months to get back, which it did.

Some good reading on nutrition and activity is Kleiber's Law. That will explain all.


I absolutely do not believe that. Not only do I not believe it but I'll quote you just one case I know.
Larry Tomkins was a Cork Gaelic footballer who was a legend for fitness and incessant training.
He tweaked a knee ligament and was told that he might be able to play if he desisted totally from all training for 12 days. Which he did.
He passed a fitness test on the morning of the Munster FInal and gave the display of his life.

There is also the case of the Zatopek effect. Look that up


I have to agree,all this talk about halving your fitness with a two week rest up is bunkum IMO and IME,yes it may take the edge off but as Gearoidmuar says it can also give you a well needed rest.
Too much work/training/riding call it what you will,but it all boils down to work and if you do too much of it its counterproductive leaving you stale and lethargic.
The mind is a powerful thing and it can get fed of too much of anything.
Last edited by reohn2 on 6 Mar 2012, 9:44pm, edited 1 time in total.
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PW
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Re: How much do you eat - on a LONG ride

Postby PW » 6 Mar 2012, 9:38pm

Cabin Fever does more damage than good definitely!
If at first you don't succeed - cheat!!

reohn2
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Re: How much do you eat - on a LONG ride

Postby reohn2 » 6 Mar 2012, 9:48pm

PW wrote:Cabin Fever does more damage than good definitely!


Walking and or other pursuits, can give the body and mind a change and an appetite for riding.
Cabin fever is soul destroying though :|
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Audax67
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Re: How much do you eat - on a LONG ride

Postby Audax67 » 6 Mar 2012, 10:02pm

Pasta the night before, pasta & bacon for breakfast. Bananas in pocket, salami, crystallized ginger, marzipan bars & gingerbread in HB bag. Stop off at ~70 km for a sandwich (i.e. 1/2 baguette w. cured ham, cheese & salad), a couple of large coffees & a vanilla eclair. That or a pizza. Stop again at around 150 km for coffee & cake, ice-cream, etc. Toddle on home with most of stuff in HB bag still intact. Still, you never know. Depending on temperature, get through about 1 litre plain water and 1/2 litre sports drink per 100k. That can double if it's hot.
Have we got time for another cuppa?

ndmbike
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Re: How much do you eat - on a LONG ride

Postby ndmbike » 10 Mar 2012, 2:47pm

Lots of interesting reading here - thanks to all posters.
Here's my penn'orth - for what it's worth.

I've recently come into cycling due to knee injuries from running and skiing.
Used to do 2 day mountain marathons.
Normally after a couple of hrs running I'd start to bonk.
I've also had two really impressive bonks when ice climbing in Norway - V cold temps with strenuous climbing seemed to cause it.

What seems to work for me is keeping hydrated as well as topping up with small amounts of low GI nibbles.
I also read something about different uptake mechanisms for glucose and fructose - meaning it is possble to absorb more simple carbs if both are present in an isotonic drink.
So... on races I would make up three packets of homemade isotonic mix of 40g glucose, 20g fructose, one crushed pro plus tablet and 1/4 teaspoon of salt. Roughly every two hrs I'd fill a 1.5 ltr water bladder with water from a stream add the mix and sip it.
I suspect it is the water rather than the concoction that is working but it is a nice race ritual! Also being really well hydrated before the event seems to work well. I think I had started many races slightly dehydrated due to travelling the night before.
After the first 2 hrs I'd eat something like a mini mars bar, or a savoury oat cake every half hr just to keep things ticking over. A countdown timer on a watch it handy to remind me to eat something - whether hungry or not.

While running I couldn't each much in one go as I would get a stitch or vomit. It seems easier to get lots of food in while cycling. I like being able to stop at cafes and fast food vans! The longest I've gone on a bike is 45 miles so I haven't had a chance to try the 'running strategy' with cycling properly. Hopefully I'll get a chance to do it this spring/summer on an audax or longer club ride.