Mud flaps

General cycling advice ( NOT technical ! )
reohn2
Posts: 40711
Joined: 26 Jun 2009, 8:21pm

Re: Mud flaps

Postby reohn2 » 15 Nov 2012, 9:47am

niggle wrote:......For my winter project touring bike build I am considering SKS Longboards: http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Mode ... elID=68581

They have mudflaps front and rear and a much deeper front mudguard, possibly the rear is longer as well? Pic from Google Images:..........

The problem with the Longboards in the photo is that the m/flap is rigid and can break off the bottom of the m/guard at the bottom stay bracket,if the bike is rolled off a curb or the edge of a big pothole.
I much prefere a very flexible front flap made from DPC this flap is usually 60to70mm wide to catch overspill and comes to within 20mm of the road surface,it trails out almost horizontal at speed,less so below say 10mph,though still catches 90% of water/muck thrown up by the front tyre.
For a rear flap I use stiff plastic from an old builders bucket or a plastic A4 file bought cheaply in a stationery shop .
PS, SKS Bluemels are a lot cheaper than Longboads :)
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Russcoles
Posts: 342
Joined: 6 Nov 2010, 8:09pm
Location: Bristol, UK

Re: Mud flaps

Postby Russcoles » 15 Nov 2012, 11:39am

Ray wrote:
Russcoles wrote:I bought a piece of bookbinding leather off ebay. I cut 2 pieces to shape and glued them together. Nik Wax is then a good idea.


Blimey, designer mudflaps :D What will be Rapha's response to this attempt to make mudflaps chic?

Ray


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Well I couldn't find a mudflap to match my paintwork

niggle
Posts: 3424
Joined: 11 Mar 2009, 10:29pm
Location: Cornwall, near England

Re: Mud flaps

Postby niggle » 18 Nov 2012, 12:40am

reohn2 wrote:The problem with the Longboards in the photo is that the m/flap is rigid and can break off the bottom of the m/guard at the bottom stay bracket,if the bike is rolled off a curb or the edge of a big pothole.
I much prefere a very flexible front flap made from DPC this flap is usually 60to70mm wide to catch overspill and comes to within 20mm of the road surface,it trails out almost horizontal at speed,less so below say 10mph,though still catches 90% of water/muck thrown up by the front tyre.
For a rear flap I use stiff plastic from an old builders bucket or a plastic A4 file bought cheaply in a stationery shop .
PS, SKS Bluemels are a lot cheaper than Longboads :)

Are they rigid mudflaps? I think have seen more flexible rubber type flaps on the latest SKS guards. Also just fitted some Bontrager 'NCS' mudguards to my Genesis, which have fairly decent flexible mud flaps front and rear. They are slimmer than the ones pictured below and quite attractive in glossy black, apart from the rather odd No Cut Stays (would not have bought them for the marked £35 but got a cheap deal on some that had been returned to a bike shop). Very easy to put on and extremely rigid blades, much quieter than SKS Chromoplastic. Hope they last...

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The other option for the touring bike would be the full Gilles Berthould stainless jobs, to which I would obviously have to add the leather flaps, but that's a lot of money...

manonbike
Posts: 113
Joined: 13 Feb 2010, 8:52pm
Location: Sutton Coldfield

Re: Mud flaps

Postby manonbike » 19 Nov 2012, 1:57pm

Thanks for all the replies re my mudflap question.

mr riff raff
Posts: 388
Joined: 4 Aug 2007, 8:00pm

Re: Mud flaps

Postby mr riff raff » 20 Nov 2012, 7:18pm

niggle wrote:There are some very nice looking leather ones on SJS, both Brooks and Gilles Berthoud, which I would pay the extra £1 for as quality looks rather better (e.g. the stainless fasteners): http://www.sjscycles.co.uk/gilles-berth ... prod27781/ Should be durable and effective I think.

For my winter project touring bike build I am considering SKS Longboards: http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Mode ... elID=68581

They have mudflaps front and rear and a much deeper front mudguard, possibly the rear is longer as well? Pic from Google Images:

Image

I was toying with some of the longboards but having see that picture, I'm glad I haven't taken the plunge.
What happens when you get a flat and take the wheel out? I rest the bike on the drop outs when it happens and that's not going to possible with them.
I'll stick to standard SKS and make a flap out of something. Currently testing a piece of rubberised plastic used for lining gutters on industrial units. Not sure it's better than my long standing favourite which is a cut up plastic milk bottle. Shame milk doesn't come in black bottles.
Politicians are wonderful people as long as they stay away from things they don't understand, such as working for a living.

PJ520
Posts: 932
Joined: 23 Mar 2008, 3:49pm
Location: Seattle WA USA

Re: Mud flaps

Postby PJ520 » 21 Nov 2012, 4:01am

Here in Seattle a flap on the rear fender, err... mudguard, is known as a 'buddy flap' because the one who benefits from it is your buddy behind you. Frankly mr riff raff's rear flap seems a bit short, my experience is that they have to come quite close to the road, say within 3", to be of any use to your buddy.
You only live once, which is enough if you do it right. - Mae West

niggle
Posts: 3424
Joined: 11 Mar 2009, 10:29pm
Location: Cornwall, near England

Re: Mud flaps

Postby niggle » 21 Nov 2012, 11:34am

Pete Jack wrote:Here in Seattle a flap on the rear fender, err... mudguard, is known as a 'buddy flap' because the one who benefits from it is your buddy behind you. Frankly mr riff raff's rear flap seems a bit short, my experience is that they have to come quite close to the road, say within 3", to be of any use to your buddy.

Seattle seems to the home of 'fender' research: http://janheine.wordpress.com/2012/11/1 ... ny-longer/

In the UK we don't have 'buddies', so its not a problem :wink: Some of us do have mates, but we don't seem as bothered about them :D

The rear mudguard/fender has to be short enough to allow wheel removal, the Longboards are approaching the limit of that, so anything further towards the ground has to be flexible or running straight down to the ground.

mr riff raff
Posts: 388
Joined: 4 Aug 2007, 8:00pm

Re: Mud flaps

Postby mr riff raff » 21 Nov 2012, 3:49pm

Pete Jack wrote:Here in Seattle a flap on the rear fender, err... mudguard, is known as a 'buddy flap' because the one who benefits from it is your buddy behind you. Frankly mr riff raff's rear flap seems a bit short, my experience is that they have to come quite close to the road, say within 3", to be of any use to your buddy.

Hang on, that's not my bike! Saddle's too low. And the frame's not red enough.

But you're right on that "buddy flap" thing you're on about. Must admit I don't use one myself, I extend the front for personal benefit.
Politicians are wonderful people as long as they stay away from things they don't understand, such as working for a living.

PJ520
Posts: 932
Joined: 23 Mar 2008, 3:49pm
Location: Seattle WA USA

Re: Mud flaps

Postby PJ520 » 22 Nov 2012, 2:11am

I got religion about "buddy flaps" while touring. If you are behind someone brave enough to bash into the weather it's nice to be able to tuck in behind and get some benefit from their draught without getting soaked by the spray from their back wheel. The same goes for them when it's your turn to lead. I managed to nag my mate into getting a decent flap and it made a world of difference. Trouble was he had a tiny flap †hing that came with his Planet Bike mudguards and he wouldn't believe it was useless.
You only live once, which is enough if you do it right. - Mae West

vjosullivan
Posts: 417
Joined: 31 Oct 2010, 12:06am

Re: Mud flaps

Postby vjosullivan » 23 Nov 2012, 9:01pm

I passed a cyclist on the way into work today, wearing waterproofs but being absolutely drenched from all directions by the spray coming up from both of his wheels. With a decent set of mudguards and flaps he could would have been drier even without any waterproofs. I'm always surprised by how few bikes have mudguards, presumably because bike design is currently led by the Americans which isn't located at the plug-hole end of the Gulf Stream.
E25

DurableAce
Posts: 116
Joined: 8 Jun 2009, 8:12pm

Re: Mud flaps

Postby DurableAce » 23 Nov 2012, 9:53pm

SKS Longboards are great, but too wide for a conventional road bike's frame clearance at 45mm diameter. Shame, as I'd have them on my winter training bike as well as my commuting bike.

I have these attached to the end of my 35mm SKS chromoplastics on my winter training bike:
http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Models.aspx?ModelID=85730

nez
Posts: 1862
Joined: 19 Jun 2008, 12:11am

Re: Mud flaps

Postby nez » 26 Nov 2012, 10:39pm

maxwellhadley wrote:I used an offcut of the rubber sheet sold for lining garden ponds - it has just the right combination of stiffness and flexibility

Ditto. It's perfect. I have enough left over from pond fabrication to see me through several lifetimes.

bother21
Posts: 30
Joined: 19 Jan 2011, 9:26pm

Re: Mud flaps

Postby bother21 » 27 Nov 2012, 12:03pm

I had some leather mudflaps but they were just too heavy and rigid (can't remember which brand they were). Looked great but weighted the mudguard down too much and were inflexible when caught in anything.

I latterly made some from old car tyre inner tube - just went down to local tyre place and asked for old tube. About the right rigidity and just cut template. They were on some mudguards I have since taken off.

Reading here I think what I may do is source some old leather from a bag or even old doc martens and cut some more leather ones.

bother21
Posts: 30
Joined: 19 Jan 2011, 9:26pm

Re: Mud flaps

Postby bother21 » 27 Nov 2012, 12:05pm

Oh yes and totally agree that I too can't understand why cyclists don't use mudguards. People covered in rain and mud on their way to work in special clothes and mud encrusted reflective waterproofs. I simply don't have special cycling clothes, wear what I'm wearing all day, but I DO have mudguards. And they DO look good.

boris
Posts: 433
Joined: 5 Nov 2010, 1:58pm

Re: Mud flaps

Postby boris » 27 Nov 2012, 10:19pm

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I cannot understand why anyone would buy a mudflap. It's like paying to have your pencil sharpened.
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