Standover measurement

General cycling advice ( NOT technical ! )
Brucey
Posts: 42904
Joined: 4 Jan 2012, 6:25pm

Re: Standover measurement

Postby Brucey » 3 Apr 2013, 10:14am

re brake pads. R2 is right, AFAIK. The BB7s are normally supplied with sintered pads.

However occasionally OEM spec parts do differ from aftermarket parts; they shave the costs down, and the punter thinks they are getting the same thing as is supplied aftermarket.

MTB forks were/are a case in point. For example, Trek used to spec RockShox at one point, but if you pulled a fork off one of their bikes, the steerer was clearly marked 'OEM specification not for resale' and the fork -although badged up like an aftermarket fork- was in fact slightly different inside.

Re copper-ease; it isn't a bad idea to put a little on the pad backings, and it can alter (reduce) squeal. It helps stem corrosion, too. But bicycle pads are tiny; you need to be very careful not to put too much on, or wind up with it on the discs. It doesn't have to migrate far to end up in the wrong place. The squeal might well stop, but the bike mightn't. :shock:

cheers
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Ayesha
Posts: 4192
Joined: 30 Jan 2010, 9:54am

Re: Standover measurement

Postby Ayesha » 3 Apr 2013, 10:18am

Don't worry about disc brakes squealing in the wet.
It provides an audible warning system for inattentative pedestrians who don't look round when its raining.

reohn2
Posts: 40711
Joined: 26 Jun 2009, 8:21pm

Re: Standover measurement

Postby reohn2 » 3 Apr 2013, 10:47am

Ayesha wrote:OK, I submit. There will always be bike types where the rule does not apply.

It's not just bike types,it's people.All people are not created equal,even if they're the same height and as such don't require the same dimensions between contact points even if they require the same frame size.

In the meantime, could you write a few short paragraphs explaining the 'correct' method of determining the position of a bicycle's handlebars?

See above,the handlebars are best placed where the rider is comfortable and not to a preset.

And why the bike's reach is more important than the seat tube length.

Because if its crazily long a rider would need a stem facing rearward to get the reach correct for them.
If it were crazily short they'd need a crazily long stem and would have extreme toe overlap.

And how the only importance of 'standover height' is that it should not clash your knackers when you step off the front of the saddle.

Preserving the family jewels is desirable and it's one of the reasons I like compact frames as I do have spherics!.
However if the frame is too compact even though the toptube is the right length for the rider it results in a crazily long seatpost which could fold backwards under the rider's weight.I'm sure a seatpost can be made not to fold under such circumstances,but triangles,rear and main begin to have very acute angles(think BMX) which don't suit heavy riders and would become almost a stepthrough.

EDIT:- in red
Last edited by reohn2 on 3 Apr 2013, 11:34am, edited 2 times in total.
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Brucey
Posts: 42904
Joined: 4 Jan 2012, 6:25pm

Re: Standover measurement

Postby Brucey » 3 Apr 2013, 10:54am

Ayesha wrote: OK, I submit. There will always be bike types where the rule does not apply.

In the meantime, could you write a few short paragraphs explaining the 'correct' method of determining the position of a bicycle's handlebars?


I refer you to Hinault and Genzling's book. This is still (IMHO) correct for road racing, and nothing to do with where the front hub appears to be. For touring, anything shorter and higher that is comfy is more or less OK.

And why the bike's reach is more important than the seat tube length. And how the only importance of 'standover height' is that it should not clash your knackers when you step off the front of the saddle.


Frame sizes are to an extent subject to the vagaries of fashion, just like hem length on skirts etc. Hopping on and off the saddle is the biggest, er, knacker knackering risk, regardless.

My notion as to 'why large frames?' back in the 40s 50s etc is that if you want to build a medium-sized frame that rides well with skinny tyres, and you only have 0.8 or 1.0mm wall PG steel tube to work with, making it large is a pretty good idea. I normally ride about a 22" frame, but a 23" PG frame (although heavier, obviously), to me, rides quite a lot like a 21- 1/2" DB frame does.

cheers
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~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Brucey~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

ron2old
Posts: 176
Joined: 15 Feb 2013, 11:46am

Re: Standover measurement

Postby ron2old » 3 Apr 2013, 8:44pm

I will set up the brakes as per the video and thanks for that. It's not that I can't be bothered to do basic maintenance I'm quite happy to do so. I enjoy cleaning and doing things to my bike and learning. It's just that you don't know you immediately need to do these things to a new bike when your new to cycling least of all how to do them. I did watch a video on YouTube on how to adjust disc brakes and it said to never touch the inside adjuster so knowing which video to watch or not is also a part of it all. I took my bike back for its first service after 6 weeks. There was nothing wrong with the bike at the time everything running smooth (including the brakes). But I took it in anyway because the first service is free bar parts and I thought it was worth having the bike checked over by an expert. It took me a good 2 weeks after that service to get my gears working properly again! I did ask on previous threads if anyone knew of a good old fashioned bike shop or mechanic in the Woking/Surrey area but no answers. Although ideally it's best to learn to do things for yourself then you know it's done properly.

andrewjoseph
Posts: 1420
Joined: 17 Nov 2009, 10:48am
Location: near Afan

Re: Standover measurement

Postby andrewjoseph » 4 Apr 2013, 9:36am

shame about the service, i'd avoid that shop in futuee if possible.

i'm reminded of the adage, 'just because it's free, doesn't mean it's good value!'.
--
Burls Ti Tourer for tarmac
Saracen aluminium full suss for trails.

reohn2
Posts: 40711
Joined: 26 Jun 2009, 8:21pm

Re: Standover measurement

Postby reohn2 » 4 Apr 2013, 11:14am

ron2old wrote:........... There was nothing wrong with the bike at the time everything running smooth (including the brakes). But I took it in anyway because the first service is free bar parts and I thought it was worth having the bike checked over by an expert. It took me a good 2 weeks after that service to get my gears working properly again!............


Doesn't say much about that particular shop :?
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