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physio advice

Posted: 2 Nov 2013, 5:38pm
by jonbott
well I broke my foot :( to be specific I broke the navicular bone in my foot after a stupid minor accident on my motorbike
Now I don`t want to argue with the consultant as he earns more than me!
but he reckons
1)my days of motorcyling are over as this bone helps support my when foot is down and on a bike once its goin its gone!
2) my cyclingl days are over too due to the fact my ankle wont be able to bend up and down like it did :(
and my job could be in jeapordy as I am/was a nurse working on a ward and he says I could struggle doing the 7hour shifts on my feet!I pointed out they`re 12hours!
Anyone got experience of breaking this bone?
Oh its held together with4 screws which will be with me for the rest of my days :roll:

Re: physio advice

Posted: 2 Nov 2013, 5:53pm
by [XAP]Bob
Various adaptations possible for a rigid ankle, swing arm cranks etc.

No idea about the real damage done, but unless the physio arrived bike...

Re: physio advice

Posted: 2 Nov 2013, 5:56pm
by pete75
Just google Barry Sheene - see how many bones he broke and carried on riding.

Re: physio advice

Posted: 2 Nov 2013, 5:57pm
by meic
jonbott wrote:well I broke my foot :( to be specific I broke the navicular bone in my foot after a stupid minor accident on my motorbike
Now I don`t want to argue with the consultant as he earns more than me!
but he reckons
1)my days of motorcyling are over as this bone helps support my when foot is down and on a bike once its goin its gone!
2) my cyclingl days are over too due to the fact my ankle wont be able to bend up and down like it did :(
and my job could be in jeapordy as I am/was a nurse working on a ward and he says I could struggle doing the 7hour shifts on my feet!I pointed out they`re 12hours!
Anyone got experience of breaking this bone?
Oh its held together with4 screws which will be with me for the rest of my days :roll:


I am sorry to say this but you dont have to put your feet down if you have a motorbike and sidecar.
Horrible things but if it is that or nothing, I would consider them.

Re: physio advice

Posted: 2 Nov 2013, 6:02pm
by jonbott
meic wrote:
jonbott wrote:well I broke my foot :( to be specific I broke the navicular bone in my foot after a stupid minor accident on my motorbike
Now I don`t want to argue with the consultant as he earns more than me!
but he reckons
1)my days of motorcyling are over as this bone helps support my when foot is down and on a bike once its goin its gone!
2) my cyclingl days are over too due to the fact my ankle wont be able to bend up and down like it did :(
and my job could be in jeapordy as I am/was a nurse working on a ward and he says I could struggle doing the 7hour shifts on my feet!I pointed out they`re 12hours!
Anyone got experience of breaking this bone?
Oh its held together with4 screws which will be with me for the rest of my days :roll:


I am sorry to say this but you dont have to put your feet down if you have a motorbike and sidecar.
Horrible things but if it is that or nothing, I would consider them.


it was a bike n sidecar I did it on :( got in caught underneath the bar betwen the bike n car and bent it back hence the busted bone

Re: physio advice

Posted: 2 Nov 2013, 7:51pm
by 531colin
I'm afraid lots of medics take the point of view that if they don't want to do something themselves, then its wrong-headed of anybody else who does want to do it, and it must be in some way "bad for you" and all the rest of the baloney.
Rehabilitating an injury is the physiotherapists job, not the surgeon......you need to find a physio. who is active and passionate about some kind of sport, they will understand that sportspeople (including recreational cyclists) are far more committed and motivated for rehabilitation than the general inactive public.
You don't need a great deal of movement in your ankle to cycle, an old pal of mine had his ankle partially stiffened after too many football injuries meant he could hardly walk. (Before that, he was a holy terror on the roughstuff.....he would ride anything, just because walking was too painful "Coming through!".....and he did!)
I'm guessing as its a sidecar injury, its your left ankle....in my day that would have been the back brake, I would have given it a go.....with the Far Eastern bikes its the gears, so that might be a nuisance.....
On the work front, I believe the employer has a duty to make "reasonable adjustments" (or some such phrase) to your working conditions to enable you to work with a disability/injury. .....whether that takes the form of working five times seven hour shifts rather than three times twelve hours, or finding a job that involves some sitting, I don't know, but there must be something useful that a qualified nurse with personal experience of sports, injury, and rehabilitation can do....?
In short, I'm sorry you're injured, but the sooner you start rehabilitation, the sooner you will be back.....it will probably hurt, but not all the time.
Good luck, and keep us posted.

Re: physio advice

Posted: 2 Nov 2013, 8:00pm
by jonbott
I`m an agency/bank nurse the consultant suggested I transfer to office work,but they don`t use us in the office and now I don`t receive any sick pay
apparently I`ll be in a `boot` in a month then 6 weeks after that I get physio
its been such a huge disaster :( I usually cycle to work and walk the dogs at least 2 hours a day,today I hobbled across the beach took ages as its windy and I`m knackered :(
annoying thing is I lost my permanent a week before this accident,but thought I`d be ok cos Ive never had a day off in the last 24 years!aghhhhhhh

Re: physio advice

Posted: 2 Nov 2013, 9:09pm
by bikercolin
First thing with Orthopaedic injury-dont panic and make quick decisions. Your body will take its time to mend. Gentle stretch and exercise will not hurt in the long run, pluss sensible diet.
I smashed my Humerous a couple of years ago 12 month of rehab and it's nearly as good as new, however I did suffer 4 months of having my arm strapped to my chest.
Il get back to you with some rehab advice, but if you have one locally gently stretch and non wieght bearing in water (swimming pool) or A jacuzzi would be better (warmer).

Don't despair things will improve you will cycle I have no doubt

Re: physio advice

Posted: 2 Nov 2013, 10:24pm
by jonbott
bikercolin wrote:First thing with Orthopaedic injury-dont panic and make quick decisions. Your body will take its time to mend. Gentle stretch and exercise will not hurt in the long run, pluss sensible diet.
I smashed my Humerous a couple of years ago 12 month of rehab and it's nearly as good as new, however I did suffer 4 months of having my arm strapped to my chest.
Il get back to you with some rehab advice, but if you have one locally gently stretch and non wieght bearing in water (swimming pool) or A jacuzzi would be better (warmer).

Don't despair things will improve you will cycle I have no doubt

cheers!I live in hope of a return to `normal`if my life was ever normal! :lol:
my other issue is trying to eat less now,I normally have a healthy diet as I do walk a lot now I`m not and spend a lot time sat with my foot up

Re: physio advice

Posted: 2 Nov 2013, 10:35pm
by Mistik-ka
531colin wrote:Rehabilitating an injury is the physiotherapists job, not the surgeon......you need to find a physio. who is active and passionate about some kind of sport, they will understand that sportspeople (including recreational cyclists) are far more committed and motivated for rehabilitation than the general inactive public.

531colin got that just right. My days as a physio are just about over (two more weeks!), and I haven't worked in orthopaedics for about a million years, but I certainly agree there'll be physios out there who will guide you back to cycling. Phone around and ask for someone with experience in therapy for feet and cyclists. The month in a "boot" is about right, as is a bit of a wait before starting physio. The surgeon is the one to make the call on that. Once the prescribed wait is over, the sooner you start physiotherapy the better. Line up a physio while you're waiting; see them the day it is permitted. It won't surprise me if you end up with some supportive orthotic inserts in your floor and cycling shoes, and likely a solid boot when you're motorcycling, but wait and see how things go once you're in therapy. Then Do Your Exercises :wink: (cause it won't work if you don't).

And don't despair. :)

And if your surgeon wants to make a friendly wager on whether or not you will be back on your bike next summer, I'll back you for 50 quid. :mrgreen:

Re: physio advice

Posted: 3 Nov 2013, 6:52am
by Mick F
I'm no physio and no medic, but I agree with the others. Get out and try it asap.

You don't need to move an ankle on a bike, it's preferable if you do, but you don't have to. My right ankle isn't a flexible as my left and I know full well that it doesn't pedal properly, but it doesn't stop or hinder me in the slightest.

Children learn to pedal by putting their feet full square on the pedals rather than using the balls of their feet. Surely you can adapt your pedalling style so you ankle isn't stressed.

Good luck, and don't listen to anyone who says you can't do something.

Re: physio advice

Posted: 3 Nov 2013, 7:42am
by 531colin
jonbott wrote:I`m an agency/bank nurse ................ I don`t receive any sick pay...............
annoying thing is I lost my permanent a week before this accident,but thought I`d be ok cos Ive never had a day off in the last 24 years!aghhhhhhh


That is tough.
I reckon you have been paying National Insurance and Royal College of Nursing contributions for a quarter of a century.....what will they do for you?
Having been nearly broken by too many years in intensive care followed by a period with somebody who thought they knew how to run a private Rehabilitation unit, my daughter is now a Case Manager working from home. (In to-days compensation culture, with ambulance-chasing lawyers trying to bump up their fees, insurance companies doing everything they can not to pay out, and consultants who are far too superior to reply to a letter, there has to be somebody who is qualified, professional, and simply and straightforwardly on the side of the patient ......whether the patient wants them to be or not, but that's another story...... that's the case managers job.) There is a whole world outside the hospital ward, my other daughter works in a childrens hospice doing respite care........

Re: physio advice

Posted: 3 Nov 2013, 11:21am
by Si
Sympathies regarding the injury and work worries.
As for cycling again...well there are people out there who carry on cycling despite having lost a leg so I don't see why a weakened foot should stop you. If it is bad you may have to change your style of cycling or even your style of cycle, but as others have said....don't try to solve a problem until you are really sure that you have the problem....talk to the physio, try cycling...see if you can still do it.