Cyclocross bike for general use, purchasing advice.

General cycling advice ( NOT technical ! )
reohn2
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Re: Cyclocross bike for general use, purchasing advice.

Postby reohn2 » 28 Apr 2014, 10:33am

grani wrote:That's a good question. I think I had the idea of availability of lighter road wheel setups being available but with the disc brakes there really isn't much out there on terms of 130mm road disc hubs.


I initially gave it a bit of thought and was slightly apprehensive but in retrospect there was no need to worry. I haven't looked back.


Because I'm sad and had 10minutes to spare I've just weighed some hubs:-
Rears
Ultegra 6600=435g
LX M535=465g
XT M756 sixbolt large flange disc hub=500g
Fronts
Ultegra 6600=270g
LX M535=270g
XT M756 six bolt large flange disc hub=315g
Not a lot of difference and in the case of the two front non disc hubs non at all,but the MTB hubs are far better sealed from the weather than the road hub.
Last edited by reohn2 on 28 Apr 2014, 10:38am, edited 5 times in total.
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Redvee
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Re: Cyclocross bike for general use, purchasing advice.

Postby Redvee » 28 Apr 2014, 10:35am

lorryslorrys wrote:
Pinnacle Arkose Three :
http://road.cc/content/review/90686-pin ... kose-three
Seems like a versatile bike made for the commuter market. My favorite at the moment.


If silver colour scheme doesn't tickle you, it's also available in blue under the Pyrolite name. Slight spec changes but the same basic bike

http://www.evanscycles.com/products/pin ... e-ec055211

pioneer
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Re: Cyclocross bike for general use, purchasing advice.

Postby pioneer » 29 Apr 2014, 8:21am

If it's any use, I'd plump for the Genesis CDF. Or the lower specced model which is basically a Day one with gears if you can find one. But in reality, I think you'd struggle to keep up with roadies on decent road bikes on a club ride, even with a change of wheels, that's not what any of these bikes are about or even intended for. Some compromises just don't work out.
I got a Day one disc last year for a bit of everything, including doing and leading club rides (but these are touring rides, not fast road work) and I am very impressed with it. It now gets used more than anything else in the shed.

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BSRU
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Re: Cyclocross bike for general use, purchasing advice.

Postby BSRU » 29 Apr 2014, 9:05am

I've managed to burn off a couple of roadies when on my Croix de Fer, even with full panniers.
Changing the wheels makes a big difference, I bought some Hope Hoops, over 600g lighter and much stiffer than the ones it comes with.
It can't half shift(depending on the state of the engine).
I imagine I might struggle against serious roadies/club riders who are race fit.
Bear in mind a CX bike is basically a road bike but with more clearance for bigger tyres.

pliptrot
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Re: Cyclocross bike for general use, purchasing advice.

Postby pliptrot » 29 Apr 2014, 12:10pm

Brucey wrote:and I don't think there ever will be... even non-disc road bikes are gradually drifting away from 130mm spacing now.
Whoa! Are road bikes moving to 135mm spacing? Really? I'm surprised (and perhaps I shouldn't be).

Brucey
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Re: Cyclocross bike for general use, purchasing advice.

Postby Brucey » 29 Apr 2014, 12:41pm

I think some versions of the current 11s hubs are ~132mm now; but you'll have to check this, I've not had a measure up myself.

If so, such a wheel will usually slip into a 130mm frame with no issues. I anticipate gradual migration to wider rear hubs as time goes on, e.g. you'll get more road bikes designed to accept 132 or 135mm hubs rather than 130 per se....

My own road bike has run a ~132.5mm rear wheel for about 12 years now, and because I've respaced the hub on the right side as well, the net dish is about the same as a standard 135mm wheel; much better.

cheers
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~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Brucey~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Psamathe
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Re: Cyclocross bike for general use, purchasing advice.

Postby Psamathe » 29 Apr 2014, 1:41pm

BSRU wrote:I've managed to burn off a couple of roadies when on my Croix de Fer, even with full panniers.
Changing the wheels makes a big difference, I bought some Hope Hoops, over 600g lighter and much stiffer than the ones it comes with.
It can't half shift(depending on the state of the engine).

(I don't mean to hijack this thread but) when you talk about "It can't half shift", what sort of speeds are you talking about (ballpark'ish). I recognise I can't spin (i.e. I'm slow cadence - something about me I guess). But max I've managed on my Croix de Fer is low 20's mph (maybe 23-24 that I've seen) and I sort of run out of gears at that point. And it's always surprised me when people on this forum talk about keeping up with traffic at 30+ mph (in terms making it sound "with ease") and I've wondered why I can't (not that I need to or anything).

Ian

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BSRU
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Re: Cyclocross bike for general use, purchasing advice.

Postby BSRU » 29 Apr 2014, 2:59pm

Psamathe wrote:(I don't mean to hijack this thread but) when you talk about "It can't half shift", what sort of speeds are you talking about (ballpark'ish). I recognise I can't spin (i.e. I'm slow cadence - something about me I guess). But max I've managed on my Croix de Fer is low 20's mph (maybe 23-24 that I've seen) and I sort of run out of gears at that point. And it's always surprised me when people on this forum talk about keeping up with traffic at 30+ mph (in terms making it sound "with ease") and I've wondered why I can't (not that I need to or anything).

Ian


I'm a spinner, I hardly ever use the smallest rear couple of cogs with the big front ring(except if I'm going down a safe hill).
I can quite easily keep up with traffic but it is rarely travelling near 30mph, more like 25mph(remember many car speedometers are probably 10% over stating the speed of the vehicle, at least). I can get the Croix de Fer to go 30mph on a flat road with no headwind but not for too long, the engine starts to overheat :wink: .

Psamathe
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Re: Cyclocross bike for general use, purchasing advice.

Postby Psamathe » 29 Apr 2014, 4:21pm

BSRU wrote:... remember many car speedometers are probably 10% over stating the speed of the vehicle, at least

I have a cycle computer and I set it up carefully and it reads slightly above my GPS on distance (given my GPS is not "tied to roads" so "cuts corners"). And I have noticed that the bike travels a shorter distance for a given trip than the car records (enough to notice though I've not recorded or measured it).

Thanks
Ian

Brucey
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Re: Cyclocross bike for general use, purchasing advice.

Postby Brucey » 29 Apr 2014, 4:30pm

if you check the calibration of car odometers (eg by driving round a time-trial course) they usually exaggerate the distance travelled by 2-5%. If you check a car speedometer (e.g. against a GPS), they are usually overstating the speed by 5-10%. I think they have to do this to be sure that they don't ever under-read (e.g. with very worn tyres). The extent to which the overread occurs varies with the car maker; '70mph' in a Ford is nowhere near the same speed as '70mph' in a Honda.

cheers
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niggle
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Re: Cyclocross bike for general use, purchasing advice.

Postby niggle » 29 Apr 2014, 4:49pm

Brucey wrote:If you check a car speedometer (e.g. against a GPS), they are usually overstating the speed by 5-10%. I think they have to do this to be sure that they don't ever under-read (e.g. with very worn tyres). The extent to which the overread occurs varies with the car maker; '70mph' in a Ford is nowhere near the same speed as '70mph' in a Honda.

cheers

This is nearly always true, the Fiesta at work reads about 4mph over at 70mph and modern BMW 'Minis' read about 7mph over, but the speedo of my current car, a lowly 2005 Kia Rio, reads spot on as compared to a GPS. Fortunately I am very literal about speed limits as well.

Most Japanese and BMW motorcycle speedos read way over, but that does not seem to have much effect on the riders' behaviour :roll:

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BSRU
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Re: Cyclocross bike for general use, purchasing advice.

Postby BSRU » 1 May 2014, 9:18am

Psamathe wrote:
BSRU wrote:I've managed to burn off a couple of roadies when on my Croix de Fer, even with full panniers.
Changing the wheels makes a big difference, I bought some Hope Hoops, over 600g lighter and much stiffer than the ones it comes with.
It can't half shift(depending on the state of the engine).

(I don't mean to hijack this thread but) when you talk about "It can't half shift", what sort of speeds are you talking about (ballpark'ish). I recognise I can't spin (i.e. I'm slow cadence - something about me I guess). But max I've managed on my Croix de Fer is low 20's mph (maybe 23-24 that I've seen) and I sort of run out of gears at that point. And it's always surprised me when people on this forum talk about keeping up with traffic at 30+ mph (in terms making it sound "with ease") and I've wondered why I can't (not that I need to or anything).

Ian

After more thought I realised the Croix de Fer has a road bike groupset, compact chainset 50/34 and 12-28 rear cassette, the same as most compact groupset road bikes. I wouldn't be using 50/12 unless I was in excess of 35mph going down a hill with a tailwind.

Wesh-Laurence
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Re: Cyclocross bike for general use, purchasing advice.

Postby Wesh-Laurence » 1 May 2014, 10:28am

Three years ago there were very few bikes meeting my and your requirements. I built my own bike up from components using a Kinesis Decade Tripster frameset. It's a lightweight aluminium frame with carbon fork and has drop handlebars, Disc brakes, 700c wheels, bosses for fitting rear pannier rack and full mudguards.

Now there are numerous off the shelf options. The one I would go for now would be one of the Whyte Bikes:-

http://whyte.bike/2014/section.php?xSec ... 8e9295ea31

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foxyrider
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Re: Cyclocross bike for general use, purchasing advice.

Postby foxyrider » 1 May 2014, 2:22pm

Rose do a very nice CX machine and it'd be an excuse for a trip to Germany to be sized up! :D

http://www.rosebikes.co.uk/products/bik ... ross-bike/

You might need to change the seat clamp to fit a rear rack without 'bodging' with P clips.
Convention? what's that then?
Airnimal Chameleon touring, Orbit Pro hack, Orbit Photon audax, Focus Mares AX tour, Peugeot Carbon sportive, Owen Blower vintage race - all running Tulio's finest!