What year Currys stopped selling bicycles?

General cycling advice ( NOT technical ! )
bagpussctc
Posts: 149
Joined: 27 Oct 2009, 6:45pm

Re: What year Currys stopped selling bicycles?

Postby bagpussctc » 11 Aug 2019, 3:03pm

Interesting . Goes to show you learn something new everyday . I based my Raleigh assumption on the two Currys head badges, I have in my collection of Raleigh and associated brands, that came from their factory in Nottingham.

Mike Sales
Posts: 3345
Joined: 7 Mar 2009, 3:31pm

Re: What year Currys stopped selling bicycles?

Postby Mike Sales » 11 Aug 2019, 3:07pm

When I was at school Curry's sold calcium carbide, I suppose for acetylene bike lights. Early sixties.
We had other uses for it.

Grandad
Posts: 1042
Joined: 22 Nov 2007, 12:22am
Location: Kent

Re: What year Currys stopped selling bicycles?

Postby Grandad » 11 Aug 2019, 8:58pm

When I was at school Curry's sold calcium carbide, I suppose for acetylene bike lights. Early sixties


Whilst doing my National Service in the mid 1950s I won first handicap in a 100 mile time trial. In those days the prize had to be either a medal or money to buy something that could be suitably engraved - for which a receipt had to be submitted - or something for the bike. (Cue LBS giving receipts for historical purchases)

My LBS had some brand new reproduction acetylene lamps, price £3, just the value of my prize. Stationed 35 miles from home, working a 3 day watch system and courting my future wife I wore a groove in the roads between camp and home, with many late night rides eating the Never Ready light batteries. A tin of carbide, price one shilling and 3 pence, lasted the remaining 6 months before demob.

Having heard from older riders how good these lights were I was very disappointed, but I suppose they came to them from the feeble oil lamps.

Later I had it re-chromed and displayed it as an unengraved trophy.

Mike Sales
Posts: 3345
Joined: 7 Mar 2009, 3:31pm

Re: What year Currys stopped selling bicycles?

Postby Mike Sales » 11 Aug 2019, 9:04pm

Grandad wrote:Whilst doing my National Service in the mid 1950s I won first handicap in a 100 mile time trial. In those days the prize had to be either a medal or money to buy something that could be suitably engraved - for which a receipt had to be submitted - or something for the bike. (Cue LBS giving receipts for historical purchases)

My LBS had some brand new reproduction acetylene lamps, price £3, just the value of my prize. Stationed 35 miles from home, working a 3 day watch system and courting my future wife I wore a groove in the roads between camp and home, with many late night rides eating the Never Ready light batteries. A tin of carbide, price one shilling and 3 pence, lasted the remaining 6 months before demob.

Having heard from older riders how good these lights were I was very disappointed, but I suppose they came to them from the feeble oil lamps.

Later I had it re-chromed and displayed it as an unengraved trophy.


If acetylene lamps were unimpressive alongside the battery lamps of the day they must indeed have been poor.
I had imagined them as bright. I gather that they needed skilled adjustment?
We used to make explosions, or drop a piece of carbide into an inkwell.

pete75
Posts: 11719
Joined: 24 Jul 2007, 2:37pm

Re: What year Currys stopped selling bicycles?

Postby pete75 » 11 Aug 2019, 9:10pm

Mike Sales wrote:
Grandad wrote:Whilst doing my National Service in the mid 1950s I won first handicap in a 100 mile time trial. In those days the prize had to be either a medal or money to buy something that could be suitably engraved - for which a receipt had to be submitted - or something for the bike. (Cue LBS giving receipts for historical purchases)

My LBS had some brand new reproduction acetylene lamps, price £3, just the value of my prize. Stationed 35 miles from home, working a 3 day watch system and courting my future wife I wore a groove in the roads between camp and home, with many late night rides eating the Never Ready light batteries. A tin of carbide, price one shilling and 3 pence, lasted the remaining 6 months before demob.

Having heard from older riders how good these lights were I was very disappointed, but I suppose they came to them from the feeble oil lamps.

Later I had it re-chromed and displayed it as an unengraved trophy.


If acetylene lamps were unimpressive alongside the battery lamps of the day they must indeed have been poor.
I had imagined them as bright. I gather that they needed skilled adjustment?
We used to make explosions, or drop a piece of carbide into an inkwell.


We used it for fishing. Curry's in Bourne sold bikes until the mid sixties at least. I got a Philips bike from there with four speed Benelux gears.