signalling a stop in Scotland vs. elsewhere in the UK

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pjclinch
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signalling a stop in Scotland vs. elsewhere in the UK

Postby pjclinch » 1 Jul 2011, 12:28pm

Bikeability Scotland is not quite the same thing as Bikeability, though the 3 levels cover pretty much the same bases. I'm based in Dundee so if I'll be teaching at my local primary school (I hope to next year after helping out at a few sessions this year) it'll be the Scottish scheme.

One of the differences is in the approach to a planned/routine stop. In Scotland the "wave" slowing down/stopping signal is the "official" way, as can be seen at http://cyclingscotland.msol.org.uk/Uploads/1301298017_Cycle_Guide.pdf (page 14) and http://cyclingscotland.msol.org.uk/Uploads/1301298068_Trainer_Guide.pdf (page 9). As far as I can gather from online materials and some online discussion that's not what's taught in the rest of the UK.

I don't think the Scottish teaching is good, and I'd be interested to hear comments and opinions on it from other people in cycle training across the UK. I think that Cyclecraft's take is right, saying that the "wave" is unusual but can be used to advantage where you have to slow in an unpredictable place in a traffic stream, and I don't think that squares with what is shown or described in the Bikeability Scotland leaflets. If you’re pulling in to the kerb as the diagram provided shows, if you need to signal at all I think a left ("I am pulling in to the left") would be more relevant and, frankly, more likely to be understood by any road user following (I've never seen the "wave" done "in anger", only in demonstrations). I think teaching something that is widely not recognised on the roads (that is should be is less important to me than that it is!) as the thing to do for a routine stop seems to be a training own-goal to me. I see the "wave" as a limited, more specialised signal that shouldn't be encouraged for routine stops.

I've queried CyclingScotland on the matter but they seem adamant the "wave" is the thing to teach. As yet I've found nobody else who thinks that so I'd like a bigger sample base before either conceding they're right or taking it back to them with some more ammunition.

Pete.
Often seen riding a bike around Dundee...

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Re: signalling a stop in Scotland vs. elsewhere in the UK

Postby Vorpal » 1 Jul 2011, 10:34pm

A stopping signal is not taught in England. In fact, (strictly read) even turn signals are considered optional.

http://www.dft.gov.uk/bikeability/wp-co ... Manual.pdf
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pjclinch
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Re: signalling a stop in Scotland vs. elsewhere in the UK

Postby pjclinch » 22 Jul 2011, 12:47pm

Following up, I got some useful feedback from John Franklin and CTC's chief training officer and Cycling Scotland have agreed it needs review and revision. So result! :-)

Pete.
Often seen riding a bike around Dundee...